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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
15 model DL 1000
So I got some nice sintered pads, Galfer, for the front and back. Installed them today without drama. Nice and easy.
I bled the brake at all three stations and its good to ride. But, I'm just not happy with the way the lever feels. It's a little spongey .
I remember reading somewhere about air in the banjo fittings. Do you just loosen the banjo a little and bleed it too?




PS I took the pads out at 10k on the clock. They had a lot of pad left . I post just for comparison, your experience may vary.
 

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Assuming you got all the air out, most pads require some break in time, some may specify a procedure, some say to rub on an abrasive. Depends on MFG. I usually just give it a few days normal use and be aware of the capabilities and if the pedal/lever/feel changes.

Other good point is to make sure the rotor was clean and no oils or fluids on them.

Sent from my RS988 using Tapatalk
 

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Spongy feel is not the pads breaking in its air in the system. Reverse bleed the brakes and get the air out.

I have posted a step by step on here a while back and there are lots of videos on YouTube. Once you learn how easy and effective reverse bleeding the brakes is you'll not do it any other way.

FWIW it looks like the stock pads (left) are only about 20/25% worn. Lots of life left on them. When you can no longer see the groove in the pad then its time to change. Brake pads have the same material consistency through the entire pad. So new or old as long as there is sufficient material they will work the same.
 

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Give the new pads some time to set to the rotors. It will get better.

Did you open the brake lines or why you think you have air in the fitting?

Some say it helps to put the bike on the side stand, turn the handle to the left and zip-tie the brake lever to the handle bar overnight.
 

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Another trick to try for a firmer front brake lever.
- Tie the lever to the bar as if you're doing an emergency braking maneuver. Use a zip tie or cording sufficient to hold the lever compressed. Leave it overnight. Check the brake feel in the morning.
That has worked for me many times to remove the 'spongy' lever feel. :thumbup:
 
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Discussion Starter #6
I'm going riding tonight but will try the zip tie brake lever overnight. In the meantime I have ordered a large syringe from Amazon.
 

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I'm going riding tonight but will try the zip tie brake lever overnight. In the meantime I have ordered a large syringe from Amazon.
Farm and fleet stores like Tractor or Agri supply also have big syringes. Even Walmart does they are disguised in the kitchen or grilling section as turkey injectors.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Well I guess there is no problem. Just got home from a little ride and the brakes are just fine. Better than fine actually, they feel like power brakes now.
There is a lot less effort needed to stop so no spongey feeling at all.
 

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Good to hear. I have had to activate my ABS on some dirt to finish the process of a fluid change.
 

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If you did change the fluid go exercise the front and rear ABS multiple times and then change the front and rear brake fluids again. That way you have a better chance of flushing out old (and corrosive) brake fluid out of the ABS unit.
 

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Well I guess there is no problem. Just got home from a little ride and the brakes are just fine. Better than fine actually, they feel like power brakes now.
There is a lot less effort needed to stop so no spongey feeling at all.
So did they just fix themselves or did you do something with them?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
It was just a problem of perception. I didn't do anything further, just went for an hour ride or so and found that things were just fine.
 

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Well I guess there is no problem. Just got home from a little ride and the brakes are just fine. Better than fine actually, they feel like power brakes now.
There is a lot less effort needed to stop so no spongey feeling at all.
Sounds like any air that might have been in the system was vibrated upwards and into the reservoir during your ride. :thumbup:
 
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Discussion Starter #14
Did I mention how much I like these new sintered pads, they are great. I saw even more improvement tonight on the second outing.
Much more authority to be had for sure, an overused term I know but true .
 

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I did the same job today @30,000k's. Not much left of the old brake pads.

They'll suck for a 100k's or so, they just don't fit the disc properly so you have a fraction of the contact area until they bed in. Just distance will fix that spongy feeling, well generally and if it doesn't you usually need new rotors as well.
 

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In all the bike brake jobs I do, opening and closing the bleeder screws on the calipers is the 1st and last things I do. Bleed at the bleeder screws., then start at the master cylinder, slight lever or pedal pressure applied, and just crack loose the banjo bolts at the hose junction at the master cylinder and look for bubbles around the sealing washers. Tighten the banjo bolt and do the same procedure at the calipers, then finally at the bleeder screws. Check and refill the fluid reservoir and...DONE.

I have had some issues with low levers - one with a Triumph Speed Triple, another with a H-D V-Rod, and presently with a '16 GSX-S1000 that is caused by sticky caliper seals retracting the caliper pistons back in their bores after a brake application. These calipers do not use outer piston boots, but use square-cut sealing rings instead. New caliper seal kits is the repair, the Triumph and V-Rod had--and still have--full levers now, and I'm waiting for the Suzuki seal kits to arrive.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
In all the bike brake jobs I do, opening and closing the bleeder screws on the calipers is the 1st and last things I do. Bleed at the bleeder screws., then start at the master cylinder, slight lever or pedal pressure applied, and just crack loose the banjo bolts at the hose junction at the master cylinder and look for bubbles around the sealing washers. Tighten the banjo bolt and do the same procedure at the calipers, then finally at the bleeder screws. Check and refill the fluid reservoir and...DONE.

Yep , that's the part I was trying to remember..
 

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Just finished upgrading my 08 Wee with EBC double H's and a set of Galfer stainless lines. Wooo baby!!
 

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Hmmm, it's raining here today... So I'll have some downtime for the bike. Would it be stupid to replace my brake fluid with the humidity so high? Considering that moisture is the enemy of brake fluid?
 
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