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I flushed my front brakes and then did the back brakes 7 days later. I used the same bottle of brake fluid for both ends. My neighbor said that I'd be fine using the fluid that had already been opened since it had only been 7 days, Do you guys agree? I should I flush that and put brand new stuff in?

Dom
 

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my rule of thumb for brake fluid is 8 weeks...if it's been open longer than that, then it's no good and i toss it...otherwise it's good to go...

i would leave it alone....7 days is less than 8 weeks in my book
 

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Unless you left the lid off the bottle for those 7 days, and you live in the sunny northwest, no need to worry at all.
 

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Well, perhaps if you left your newly opened brake fluid container with the cap off in your bathroom, and you took long hot showers twice a day, you might need to think about it. But c'mon, 7 days? How often do you change out your fluid in you bike? Twice a month or more? As long as you re-capped your BF container after you used it, I see no reason to worry about the unused fluid in the bottle for a year or more.

I T-R-Y to change my brake fluids every couple of years or so, but sometimes I may go 3 or 4 years, as long as the stuff isn't dark. The main problem with old fluid is that it picks up moisture which, when heated under severe braking conditions, can vaporize and create air voids in the caliper and cause spongy lever feel/reduce stopping effectiveness. But unless you're running your Strom on the track or REALLY hooning the back road twisties :yikes: you're not likely to boil your brake fluid in normal street riding.

Relax, you're doing a better job of maintenance than most of us... :thumbup:
 

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A long steep downhill can be enough to overheat the brakes. Two 4-wheel examples...(1) a friend was towing his horse trailer down Mt. Adams when his brake pedal suddenly went to the floor. He managed to stop using his parking brake and downshifting. He did some deep breathing, changed his shorts, and looked over his truck finding nothing wrong except hot brakes. After a short time he started driving again and his brakes worked OK. His mechanic told him that old, moisture laden brake fluid had vaporized from the heat of his hard braking. (2) In nearby Deception Pass state park a minivan ran away downhill despite the driver's hard braking. It hit and killed a child. The state patrol report stated that the brake fluid had overheated and vaporized due to the hard braking. Two lessons here--keep good brake fluid in the system and downshift on severe downhills.

Does Ohio have long steep downhills?
 

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A long steep downhill can be enough to overheat the brakes. Two 4-wheel examples...(1) a friend was towing his horse trailer down Mt. Adams when his brake pedal suddenly went to the floor. He managed to stop using his parking brake and downshifting. He did some deep breathing, changed his shorts, and looked over his truck finding nothing wrong except hot brakes. After a short time he started driving again and his brakes worked OK. His mechanic told him that old, moisture laden brake fluid had vaporized from the heat of his hard braking. (2) In nearby Deception Pass state park a minivan ran away downhill despite the driver's hard braking. It hit and killed a child. The state patrol report stated that the brake fluid had overheated and vaporized due to the hard braking. Two lessons here--keep good brake fluid in the system and downshift on severe downhills.

Does Ohio have long steep downhills?
Two words: Engine braking. Not after you realize the brakes are gone, but to maintain speed on the downhill to begin with.
Even with brand new, bone dry brake fluid.
 

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A long steep downhill can be enough to overheat the brakes. Two 4-wheel examples...a friend was towing his horse trailer down Mt. Adams when his brake pedal suddenly went to the floor.
Next time I pull a horse trailer with my Wee, I'll be sure to change my brake fluid... :confused:

Does Ohio have long steep downhills?
A few hills in OH are 400 vertical ft at the largest. But they can be steep coming in and out of the river valleys.

I wasn't suggesting that the OP should never maintain his brake system, merely that most people I know are still driving around in cars--and on some old bikes--with brake fluid that came from the factory 10-15 year ago. Not saying it's right...
 
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