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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm struggling a little to decide whether to try to fix my front brakes myself or hand them in to a garage to get them fixed. The front brake calipers does not slide as they should, with the effect that there is alwas a certain remaining brake after I have used it for braking. In fact, when putting the bike on the center stand and lifting the front wheel up, I CAN move it, but just, it does not spin, instead it stops directly. And I can see that the pads are not evenly weared down, on one side of the disc, they are thinner. So it has to be fixed before I can take my DL 650 for a ride again.

I have also just this morning ordered some EBC HH brake pads. When I talked to the stupid Suzuki garage here in France, they said they would only fit their standard ones, but after reading some of the discussions, I realised I should not let that stop me. So, how difficult is this?

Thanks for any advice
Johan
 

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It's not hard to do. I take mine apart periodically and clean the pins. Mine have some slight corrosion and pitting also.
 

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New pads will not fix this problem. The problem is the caliper. The strom uses brake calipers that slide on metal pins - it's cheap old-tech brake design, they were old when my 84 Kaw was new.... These pins eventually get worn, and as they do, they tend to get hung up on the wear areas - not retracting fully and dragging is a common problem when the caliper pins get worn or pitted - just like your bike. It's very gradual, but it seems like you've hit the wall on this one.

Inspect your calipers and assess how much the sliding surfaces on the pins have worn. Might only need a bit of cleaning off, a bit of emery cloth/sandpaper polishing, to work well again.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
New pads will not fix this problem.
...
Inspect your calipers and assess how much the sliding surfaces on the pins have worn. Might only need a bit of cleaning off, a bit of emery cloth/sandpaper polishing, to work well again.
Well, I got that the pads has nothing to do with this. I just bought them because I wanted to change them while doing the work on the calipers.
So if I interpret you right, the design is made to wear the pins instead of the calipers.
So if the pins are bad, and I don't get it to work again, I can replace the pins and will avoid having new calipers ? (which I assume would be quite expensive)

Johan
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Besides being clean, the pins should be lightly greased with hi-temp silicone brake grease.
 

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Besides being clean, the pins should be lightly greased with hi-temp silicone brake grease.
Listen to this man. The stuff is available at any auto parts store. Don't use any other kind of grease, don't ask how I know.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Bleeding problem

Ok, Now I've done it and managed to get everything apart (with the help from a garage to actually drill the caliper and then hammer out the bolts that keep the brake pads in place, they were in fact so stuck that we both questioned if we were doing the right thing...)

And I also managed to get everything cleaned and put in place again, with some proper grease and new oil and everything. So far so well. Only the bleeding to do.

And I did really try, but I did not in the end manage to get all the air out. Have now searched but could not find a good "how to". A few questions arise:

1. When I bleed the front brakes, should I have the lid of the brake fluid container on or off? I have read people writing about seeing bubbles coming up through the container...
2. I have not hose to connect to the bleeding valve, but when I pump up a pressure and the losen the valve, the fluid comes directly, no single indication of air or anything. It should not be a problem. But, is there any specific order for doing this? Right or left first? Both at the same time?
3. I read about the master cylinder. Is there another bleeding valve for that one, in addition to the ones on the calipers?
4. Have I missed something?

I really appreciate help on this.

Johan

...who has managed to shift piston on his sons motocross, but hits the ground hard when trying to bleed the brakes of the v-strom... :confused:
 

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1. When I bleed the front brakes, should I have the lid of the brake fluid container on or off? I have read people writing about seeing bubbles coming up through the container...
Yes - you need to add fluid as it depletes. Bubbles good. You want them out.
2. I have not hose to connect to the bleeding valve, but when I pump up a pressure and the losen the valve, the fluid comes directly, no single indication of air or anything. It should not be a problem. But, is there any specific order for doing this? Right or left first? Both at the same time?
Right/left first does not matter. Squeeze the lever, break open the bleeder. Close bleeder, release lever. Repeat until there are no signs of air. Tapping the calipers, hose, master cylinder with a wrench or the like can help the air move out.
3. I read about the master cylinder. Is there another bleeding valve for that one, in addition to the ones on the calipers?
No. But some air will rise through the master cylinder as you bleed the system.
4. Have I missed something?
Nope.

I really appreciate help on this.

Johan

...who has managed to shift piston on his sons motocross, but hits the ground hard when trying to bleed the brakes of the v-strom... :confused:
 

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Ok, Now I've done it and managed to get everything apart (with the help from a garage to actually drill the caliper and then hammer out the bolts that keep the brake pads in place, they were in fact so stuck that we both questioned if we were doing the right thing...)

And I also managed to get everything cleaned and put in place again, with some proper grease and new oil and everything. So far so well. Only the bleeding to do.

And I did really try, but I did not in the end manage to get all the air out. Have now searched but could not find a good "how to". A few questions arise:

1. When I bleed the front brakes, should I have the lid of the brake fluid container on or off? I have read people writing about seeing bubbles coming up through the container...
2. I have not hose to connect to the bleeding valve, but when I pump up a pressure and the losen the valve, the fluid comes directly, no single indication of air or anything. It should not be a problem. But, is there any specific order for doing this? Right or left first? Both at the same time?
3. I read about the master cylinder. Is there another bleeding valve for that one, in addition to the ones on the calipers?
4. Have I missed something?

I really appreciate help on this.

Johan

...who has managed to shift piston on his sons motocross, but hits the ground hard when trying to bleed the brakes of the v-strom... :confused:
Don't know what bolts you were drilling and hammering, but on the front calipers all that you need to do is remove the the clip from the pin, slide it out and remove the pads.
 

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Don't know what bolts you were drilling and hammering, but on the front calipers all that you need to do is remove the the clip from the pin, slide it out and remove the pads.
They can get pretty corroded and stuck in a wet climate, especially if the pads have been installed a long time.

I hope he realized there were clips to remove! :yikes:
 

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Discussion Starter #12
They can get pretty corroded and stuck in a wet climate, especially if the pads have been installed a long time.

I hope he realized there were clips to remove! :yikes:
Yep, they were corroded and impossible to remove in any simple way. It was definitely not a case of "remove the clip and slide it out".

We had to turn the caliper on the side and
1. drill a hole in the caliper, from the opposite side of where you slide in the pin 2. stick a metal stick into the hole til it got in contact with the pin
3. hammer with full force on the stick to "hammer out" the pin.

It was a two man job, holding the caliper and hammering. So yes, it was kind of corroded...

BLEEDING THE BRAKES
Back to the bleeding, I did almost succed. But not fully. Did not get a firm response, so I was not very happy yesterday eve. Dont know what to do really. There were no bubbles coming up through the container. I tapped on the calipers and the hoses and tried my best but it did not work.
Guess I will have to take it to the garage to get some help with this. But it is still annoying. It is one of those things that should not be too complicated...
 

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Discussion Starter #13
New brake pads

Installed new EBC HH brake pads in the evening and also added some more grease to the pins to make the caliper slide better and voila! Suddenly I had a much better situation:

Before: Lifting the front and making the wheel turn, it was only spinning one time, one lap so to say. The brakes made so much friction it stopped.

After: The wheel does not stop spinning !!! :thumbup:

And the brakes got firmer and I now feel somewhat happier. I will though take the bike to the garage to get them to try to air the system, because I think the brakes could be even firmer.
 
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