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Hey yall,

Its almost frustrating, but I cant quite figure out why my FWD LH caliper doesn't pull the brake pads back all the way. The pads drag on the rotor. THe right side make no noise, nor does the rear. I bleed the brakes two weeks ago and am puzzled. I ran the rotors on the truing stand and both the front are 4 thousandths and 5 thousandths of an inch of of true. The tollerance is 12 thousandths. Any input would be great!
 

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What do you mean by flushed with fluid? I did the brake bleed. And I haven't greased up the slides. Honestly I haven't ever done much with calipers before. The bike is a 04 with 10k on it. I have only had one riding season given I bought it a year ago. I believe it was originally sold and bought here in Anchorage, AK.
 

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Bleed the brakes until you feel that you have shot all the old fluid out and are now wasting new juice. Remove the calipers and you will find pins that require lubrication to allow the caliper to float, this should fix everything. Make sure also that there is no rust on the pads or pad pins, if there is, lightly sand and put a thin layer of grease on them as well. :fineprint: A service manual may help.


Common Sense disclaimer:
(Keep your hands clean when handling the pads and don't get grease on them or the discs)
 

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The caliper does not pull the pads away from the rotor when you release the brakes. The runout of the disc pushes them away, and there might be some tension in the seal around the piston that helps pull it back. You might have a slightly sticky piston and/or sticky slides. You can check the piston by removing the caliper, removing the pad, and pulling a piston out or blowing it out with air pressure. Clean it with clean brake fluid and push it back into place. If this doesn't work and everything else seems OK, maybe new piston seals are due.
 

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It's an '04. I'd say it's time for new piston seals, even though the mileage is low.
 

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There can also be dried dirt everywhere and us used seals are probably stiffer than ones that are used.

Additionally if wheel is installed incorrectly it may be out of alignment with a caliper/fork etc
 

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+1 on greasing up the pins. My old Kawi had the same calipers as stock on the Vee and I used to grease it up 3 times a year. Use hi temp grease, and use lots ... it makes a big difference. While the calipers are off, clean the brake pistons with some brake cleaner and an old toothbrush. Make sure all the exposed piston is clean and shiney.
 

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It's an '04. I'd say it's time for new piston seals, even though the mileage is low.
need new seals on my 09 any suggestions on sourcing for someone on the left coast of Canada??
 

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need new seals on my 09 any suggestions on sourcing for someone on the left coast of Canada??
I bought mine through Holeshot. The parts guys there are decent and they treat me well. I replaced the pistons at the same time because they were corroded from many many miles of salty riding.

Any Suzuki dealer can get them for you. They're only a few bucks.
 

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Brake Grease

The feedback you've received so far is all good. Just be aware that the "grease" that a few have referred to is special silicone grease specifically formulated for brake systems. It is important that you don't use any old grease.
 

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The caliper does not pull the pads away from the rotor when you release the brakes. The runout of the disc pushes them away, and there might be some tension in the seal around the piston that helps pull it back. You might have a slightly sticky piston and/or sticky slides. You can check the piston by removing the caliper, removing the pad, and pulling a piston out or blowing it out with air pressure. Clean it with clean brake fluid and push it back into place. If this doesn't work and everything else seems OK, maybe new piston seals are due.
This is complete and utter bollocks, nonsense. Who told you this? Go slap them.

The system is a pump, you pump fluid down with the brake lever, it pushes fluid down into the calipers and pushes the pistons out. When you release the lever the fluid returns to the reservoir. Very simple.

N.
 

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The system is a pump, you pump fluid down with the brake lever, it pushes fluid down into the calipers and pushes the pistons out. When you release the lever the fluid returns to the reservoir. Very simple.
How do you think the fluid returns to the reservoir? It's exactly as PTRider has outlined. The runout on the disc and elasticity of the seal pushes the pistons which push the fluid back into the reservoir. Drum brakes had to have return springs because the leading shoe was driven into the drum by its rotation. Disc pads are driven away from the disc by the rotation.
 

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Roger on that!

How do you think the fluid returns to the reservoir? It's exactly as PTRider has outlined. The runout on the disc and elasticity of the seal pushes the pistons which push the fluid back into the reservoir. Drum brakes had to have return springs because the leading shoe was driven into the drum by its rotation. Disc pads are driven away from the disc by the rotation.
You don't miss much, Greywolf.
 

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How do you think the fluid returns to the reservoir? It's exactly as PTRider has outlined. The runout on the disc and elasticity of the seal pushes the pistons which push the fluid back into the reservoir. Drum brakes had to have return springs because the leading shoe was driven into the drum by its rotation. Disc pads are driven away from the disc by the rotation.
Runout on the disk would certainly have the effect of pushing the piston back inwards but that's not by design - rotors are designed to be flat and true. Two things cause the pistons to retract when you release the brakes lever/pedal: The return of fluid to the master cylinder reservoir creating some amount of negative pressure which is aided by a spring within the MC, and some slight spring action caused by the square-section o-ring deforming when the brakes are used, wanting to return to their molded shape, and retracting the piston when they do.


N.
 

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The fact is no disc is perfectly true. Get a wheel in the air then apply and release the brakes on that wheel. Turn the wheel and you will hear and feel the pads rubbing. Do it on the rear wheel while on the center stand. Then run the engine in gear to spin the wheel at speed for a few seconds. Turn the engine off and turn the wheel by hand. It will be much freer.
 

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The fact is no disc is perfectly true. Get a wheel in the air then apply and release the brakes on that wheel. Turn the wheel and you will hear and feel the pads rubbing. Do it on the rear wheel while on the center stand. Then run the engine in gear to spin the wheel at speed for a few seconds. Turn the engine off and turn the wheel by hand. It will be much freer.
Well, in fact mine are actually flat and true, but I get your point. What I called BS on was the statement that disk runout was somehow the 'designed' mechanism for the return of the caliper pistons into the calipers.

N.
 

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a bit of thought first; please

Statements like this should be given more thought before posting. We're all guilty sometimes of being driven by our pet peeves to reply quickly, and sometimes sarcastically. Our words don't always come across to others as they were intended.

"This is complete and utter bollocks, nonsense. Who told you this? Go slap them."
 

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+1 on greasing up the pins. My old Kawi had the same calipers as stock on the Vee and I used to grease it up 3 times a year. Use hi temp grease, and use lots ... it makes a big difference.
It certainly does, feels like new brakes after each time.
I clean and polish mine with crocus cloth, then apply a thin oil and wipe dry - like brand new for ~1000 miles or so.
 
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