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If I go with the Anakee 3's what type?? Biased or radial? Is the 110/90-19 a good choice for the front? I figured don't need a speed rating over 130. Thoughts opinions?
 

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Other than your lawn tractor... who would buy a bias ply (assuming you can actually buy them) for any road vehicle, period? :confused:
 

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Knobbies like the TKC80 are still bias ply.

The 110/80 R 19 M/C 59V F TL is a great choice for the front. The V speed rating is about more than just speed. The tire may be more stable at highway speed than the H rated tire, although either would be very good. For the extra $6, I'd get the V. The "R" in the listing indicates Radial.
110 mm carcass width
80% carcass width to height ratio
R radial
M/C motorcycle
59 Load Index
V speed rating
F front
TL tubeless
 

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Unquestionably, for cars a radial is a better choice than a cross-ply (bias-ply), except in rugged off road conditions.

But is this generally true for motorbikes?
Doubtless the wide-spread usage of the radial design for high-speed low-profile tyres comes from definite advantages there.

There are still plenty of bias ply (and bias belted) tyres available in higher profile / lower speed ratings.
Is it a matter of marginally cheaper manufacturing, or are there some real benefits to the older design? [Apart from perhaps a more damage resistant side-wall.]
Expert opinions welcome !

(I currently run Q-rated tyres, so the H versus V-speed-rated issue is well over my head.)
.
 

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Other than your lawn tractor... who would buy a bias ply (assuming you can actually buy them) for any road vehicle, period? :confused:
I guess that would be me.
I have a Heideneau K60 Scout on the rear of my 650 which is bias ply with 16,000 km on it and I wouldn't be suprised if I get another 4,000 before it is done.It is now my tire of choice for my bike.:yesnod:
 
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Unquestionably, for cars a radial is a better choice than a cross-ply (bias-ply), except in rugged off road conditions.

But is this generally true for motorbikes?
Doubtless the wide-spread usage of the radial design for high-speed low-profile tyres comes from definite advantages there.

There are still plenty of bias ply (and bias belted) tyres available in higher profile / lower speed ratings.
Is it a matter of marginally cheaper manufacturing, or are there some real benefits to the older design? [Apart from perhaps a more damage resistant side-wall.]
Expert opinions welcome !

(I currently run Q-rated tyres, so the H versus V-speed-rated issue is well over my head.)
.
back in the mid '80s, CRREL (Cold Regions Research & Engineering Lab) of the Army Corps of Engineers did a study on radial tires for the US military, their research caused the military to start using radial tires on all their rubber tire vehicles, even slow moving ones going on rough terrain

I only remember this cause I went on an educational field trip thru the facility, cool stuff they do there

http://www.crrel.usace.army.mil/crrel/CRREL_Retrospective_1986-1990.pdf



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pros of bias

the main reason that in my experience a person can benefit from a bias ply tire on a motorcycle is simple. feel. radial tires are better in that you can take the further in a turn before they will slide out on you. however they give you almost no warning of when you are at your limit of angle, but a bias ply tire has a more profound feeling at that point. so a beginner could benefit from understanding that feeling. most likely this is more important for someone in road racing, but knowing the limitations of your bike is never bad. Its like learning to race in a full on F1 car VS a 240z.
 

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the main reason that in my experience a person can benefit from a bias ply tire on a motorcycle is simple. feel. radial tires are better in that you can take the further in a turn before they will slide out on you. however they give you almost no warning of when you are at your limit of angle, but a bias ply tire has a more profound feeling at that point. so a beginner could benefit from understanding that feeling. most likely this is more important for someone in road racing, but knowing the limitations of your bike is never bad. Its like learning to race in a full on F1 car VS a 240z.
Is there documentation for that asertation about the superiority of bias ply tires under certain circumstances?
 

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Not dead yet!

If I read it correctly, the Heidenau K76 is a bias tire - and one that gets rave reviews at that.
 

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Superiority is not the point at all, all I was pointing out is the potential worth of them. The information was obtained from years of working in a motorcycle tire shop. From the opinions of a wide source of riders, semi pro, pro, and life long enthusiasts.
 

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I have had 2 Metzler 880 rear tires. I believe these are bias ply tires. I have used them with Pilot Road 3 trail and Anakee 2 which are radials. They have all performed well on pavement which I ride 99% of the time. My experience is that there is no difference for a motorcycle.
 

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I think I'll revive this thread.

When I got my first bike (1999 CB750 Nighthawk) It came with a set of Avon radials. The rear was almost new and the front had a few thousand on it so they ended up wearing out at the same time. After riding it for several months and getting a feel for the bike, I brought it in to a highly recommended motorcycle mechanic.

He told me that the NH suspension was intended to work with bias-ply tires and would handle better with them so he ordered a set of Bridgestone Battleaxe B45's and once I rode it, the difference was noticeable.

So I'm wondering if the same thing is true of the V-Strom. Is the suspension made to handle pavement best with radials?? If you do mostly dirt, do bias-ply tires work better??
 

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I think I'll revive this thread.

When I got my first bike (1999 CB750 Nighthawk) It came with a set of Avon radials. The rear was almost new and the front had a few thousand on it so they ended up wearing out at the same time. After riding it for several months and getting a feel for the bike, I brought it in to a highly recommended motorcycle mechanic.

He told me that the NH suspension was intended to work with bias-ply tires and would handle better with them so he ordered a set of Bridgestone Battleaxe B45's and once I rode it, the difference was noticeable.

So I'm wondering if the same thing is true of the V-Strom. Is the suspension made to handle pavement best with radials?? If you do mostly dirt, do bias-ply tires work better??
I'm not sure about that.
I'd be real surprised if the V-strom suspension was designed for one or the other. Having recently fitted a set of Anakee Wilds (which are a Nobby radial tyre), and prior to that running through a set of Anakee 3s (and before them the OEM Bridgestones) the bike seems fine. Although having said that the Wilds feel pretty ordinary on pavement compared to the 3s, but that's to be expected from any Nobby style tread, and they've not yet "bedded in" after only about 300kms so far so our pavement relationship is still "developing".
Off road however, they're great.



 

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I'm running a Mitas E-07 (radial) back and Shinko 804 (bias) up front. No issues that I can tell and many others are running this same combo.
 

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i once used a 90 profile front tire on my v-strom and didnt like it. threw the handling off a bit, and looked weird. too tall & skinny. i recommend stock size tire. 110/80/19.

The OEM 110/80 is an uncommon size. 110/90 is much more available problem is though that puts the tire right up into the fender.

100/90 is common but that is slightly narrower than the OEM and makes the bike turn in a bit quicker in my experience.

Bias vs. radial is more a speed rating I think. The radial will have stiffer sidewalls and maybe that accounts for the feel in the turns? Don't know. When I changed front tires I went with a 100/90 so the turn in changed enough from stock that I wouldn't have known the difference between radial or bias!
 

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Running Shinko 804 805's on the Strom right now and have nothing bad to say about them, Inexpensive and work great. They are Bias Ply tires.
 
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