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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I've bought my first house, it was build in 1983, it's a california home and it the garage has an unfinished roof. Anyway I have been looking for a good way to suspend the front/rear end of my bike in the new garage. (my old garage was built by my dad out of pilfered oilfield steel) I am looking to use a rope hoist or a chain hoist, but I'm wondering if i'm going to damage my house by picking the house up by the beams. oh this is the hoist i'm leaning towards Chain Hoist - Low Sale Prices on this 1 Ton Chain Hoist
 

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Don't know the size or condition of the beams, but why would you want to lift a bike like that? It will be like a pendulum, swinging about when you try to work on it. If they're typical garage beams and only made from 2x4's, I'd say don't do it.
 

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If its just the motorcycle then an eye lag sideways (horizontal) into the beam about 2/3 of the way up.

If in the future your going to be pulling big blocks then I would get some iron across like 3 roof beams, or joists etc., Also with metal brackets so your into it sideways not just the threads.

I use universal swing arm lift and the ratchet straps to eyes worked fine
 

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unclear

elaboirate

do you mean rafters, tie-beams, strongbacks or what?

an annotated photo would be VERY helpful

my present garage has a huge beam - no worries for me

my old garage did not - it only had 2x6 ties - so I propped them to the floor slab, prop was located nearby to the bike with a 2x4 - that way most of the bike weight went almost directly down the new 2x4 (or use 2-2x4 if worried)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I will have to take a photo when I get home, I don't plan on lifting the entire bike just the front end for when I pull the forks, or the rear end when I change tires/shocks out.

The stuff seemed pretty structural, it definately wasn't comprised of 2X4's. as far as mounting to the beam I was just going to throw a length of chain around it and suspend the hoist from that.
 

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I've hung the entire bike from a pair of ceiling joists a couple of times. It's not a problem. Trusses rather than stick built overheads engineered to handle roofs outside of snow, earthquake or hurricane country may be significantly weaker but I don't think any such place exists.:mrgreen:

I used four ratchet type tie downs over the tops of the joists.
 

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In my basement, I've suspended 550 lbs (Kawi ZRX1100) by 4 eyebolts screwed into the bottom of 2"x8" (or 2"x10"??) wooden floorbeams above........the two front eyebolts are approximately 32" -40" apart on the same beam, same for rear. Never a problem. Using (4) tie-downs instead of a chain-fall or come-along......rachet tie-downs sound like the best to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I used to use the ratched tie downs to perform this feat, but I really would love the ability to completely suspend the bike a foot or so in the air for changing the front and rear tires simultaneously... of course it will require a guide line to keep it from spinning around since it's suspended from a single point.
 

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I have a chain hoist to use for that very need should it arise. I used a nylon rope hoist to hold the roof of my CJ-6 jeep out of the way. It was hooked to the top cross piece of the roof. I've also used a tie down strap wrapped around a rafter to lift a bike.
Almost anything works for those in need!
 

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Just had my Wee suspended from 4 ratcheting tie downs this weekend. Two attached to the crash guards and two to the rear factory rack. Comes out to what, 110 lbs each? Attached to the 2x4 garage rafter/joists by just looping tem over. No problem.

IANAL,YMMV,Don't do this at home kids, etc.
 

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Heh

I borrowed a friends garage and chain hoist to lube the swingarm and rear suspension bearings on my DL 650.

Worked well until it came time to lower it. I was holding the DL to stabilize it - it swivelled around the front wheel, cut my legs out from under me, threw me over the top of the bike and then jumped up and down on me.

Beautifully executed throw and pin ;)

Pete
 

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So, I'm going to rant a little bit about misconceptions around roof framing. If you have a modern, recently built garage, chances are the roof is framed with pre-fabricated trusses. If you look up into the framing and it looks like a series of triangles put together with metal plates, then each of those triangles is a truss. If this is the case, then the horizontal member running wall-to-wall is not a "joist" and certainly not a "beam". It is the bottom "chord" of an engineered device whose primary function is to act in tension to keep the ends from spreading apart under the load of the roof, which is applied to the sloping members of the truss. A free-body-diagram of the calculations will reveal that this chord is not designed to carry any vertical load. O.K., but it still does, right? That's just because it's there, and has some strength in that vector whether it's designed for it or not. How much strength is your crap-shoot. Sure, people put sheets of plywood on these boards, thinking it's some kind of attic for "light storage". But pretty soon they've got cases of oil and old Volkswagen motors up there. Realistically, a relatively short bottom chord will probably support a motorcycle, but don't depend on it. When this member fails, your bike will fall and only the presence of the neighbor trusses will prevent the roof from collapsing and the garage walls from falling outward. Rant over, good luck.
 

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I've hung the entire bike from a pair of ceiling joists a couple of times. It's not a problem. Trusses rather than stick built overheads engineered to handle roofs outside of snow, earthquake or hurricane country may be significantly weaker but I don't think any such place exists.:mrgreen:

I used four ratchet type tie downs over the tops of the joists.
+1
........Mike
 

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My garage roof joists are 2X6 and certainly strong enough individually, but just to be extra cautious I suspend the chain hoist from a 4X4 post which is laid lengthwise across several joists to distribute the load.

A more important point is where you attach the lifting straps to the bike -- NOT the handlebars, I hope.
 

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So, I'm going to rant a little bit about misconceptions around roof framing. If you have a modern, recently built garage, chances are the roof is framed with pre-fabricated trusses. If you look up into the framing and it looks like a series of triangles put together with metal plates, then each of those triangles is a truss. If this is the case, then the horizontal member running wall-to-wall is not a "joist" and certainly not a "beam". It is the bottom "chord" of an engineered device whose primary function is to act in tension to keep the ends from spreading apart under the load of the roof, which is applied to the sloping members of the truss. A free-body-diagram of the calculations will reveal that this chord is not designed to carry any vertical load. O.K., but it still does, right? That's just because it's there, and has some strength in that vector whether it's designed for it or not. How much strength is your crap-shoot. Sure, people put sheets of plywood on these boards, thinking it's some kind of attic for "light storage". But pretty soon they've got cases of oil and old Volkswagen motors up there. Realistically, a relatively short bottom chord will probably support a motorcycle, but don't depend on it. When this member fails, your bike will fall and only the presence of the neighbor trusses will prevent the roof from collapsing and the garage walls from falling outward. Rant over, good luck.
Exactly. I'm currently making plans to finish the interior of my garage. For the reason NewSuz mentioned, rather than hanging my bikes or anything else from the truss system, my plans include a properly sized beam to run the width of the garage which will be supported at each end by posts in the walls. The beam will be located up inside the attic space and will not be visible after the ceiling is dry walled. I will have several attachment rings protruding from the ceiling that I can hook on to when needed. There will be no additional stress added to the truss system when I hang heavy loads from the beam.

My favorite feature however will be the infrared heating system. :yesnod:
 

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So, I'm going to rant a little bit about misconceptions around roof framing. If you have a modern, recently built garage, chances are the roof is framed with pre-fabricated trusses. If you look up into the framing and it looks like a series of triangles put together with metal plates, then each of those triangles is a truss. If this is the case, then the horizontal member running wall-to-wall is not a "joist" and certainly not a "beam". It is the bottom "chord" of an engineered device whose primary function is to act in tension to keep the ends from spreading apart under the load of the roof, which is applied to the sloping members of the truss. A free-body-diagram of the calculations will reveal that this chord is not designed to carry any vertical load. O.K., but it still does, right? That's just because it's there, and has some strength in that vector whether it's designed for it or not. How much strength is your crap-shoot. Sure, people put sheets of plywood on these boards, thinking it's some kind of attic for "light storage". But pretty soon they've got cases of oil and old Volkswagen motors up there. Realistically, a relatively short bottom chord will probably support a motorcycle, but don't depend on it. When this member fails, your bike will fall and only the presence of the neighbor trusses will prevent the roof from collapsing and the garage walls from falling outward. Rant over, good luck.
You gave me a big old stiffy reading that. Just use the 4x4 trick across two chords if your house is built with wimpy trusses, avoiding any dove tail joint areas. Preferrably with the 4x4 snuggled close to a diagonal in the truss where it is strongest.

If you have 2x6s, like I do, just move over toward 1 wall or the other (or near a column) where the rafter is strongest. The wee/VEE doesn't weigh that much. If your house collapses keep in mind I am only licensed to engineer in IN and KY, so please do not sue me.....
 

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I wanted to do the same thing and just put two 2x4s across the expanse of my garage (12'). They sit on end, side by side and easily hold up one end of the bike using non-ratcheting tie downs. The tie downs are hooked into loops of 1" tubular webbing, which are looped around the 2x4s permanently. I use these for 620 lb. PC800 also. Both have centerstands to pivot on.
 

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Trusses rather than stick built overheads engineered to handle roofs outside of snow, earthquake or hurricane country may be significantly weaker but I don't think any such place exists.
Then you've not been down in the Dixie south very much. As a guy who spent most of his life in Michigan, I can tell you that I was almost shocked at the difference in home construction techniques between the snowbelt north and the Dixie south. Many structures down here would never pass inspection up north.

The only good garages down here are ones built by Yankees. :)
 
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