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Honestly the tire tools are less than 1/2 the equation. Technique is the lions share of getting tars installed
Agreed. It's a skill you have to build. You absolutely should NOT be damaging yourself, your tires, your tools, or your wheels. STOP and THINK if you're getting frustrated or starting to apply too much force.

I carry three lightweight 8 inch tar arns in my tool kit and can break the beads on tubed and tubeless tires and do a complete tire change with them. (Seriously, some of the deadly stupid crap you see around breaking beads is mind-boggling.)

I use squares from beverage bottles as rim protectors, and have never gouged a wheel or damaged a tire. At home I use one longer Motion Pro tire iron to speed things up, but it's not necessary.

There are skrillions of good (and lots of dangerously awful) Youtube videos out there, but tire changing is one area where I think in-person coaching might be a really good idea if you're not grokking things right off the bat. I've shown several riders how to change tires using the simplest of tools. I've used a No-Mar, and considered buying one, but it takes up a lot of space and there's little advantage in speed if you know what you're doing with simple tools.

There's still a fairly steep learning curve, and you have to build some experience... most people I've coached decide they could probably handle it in a pinch, but will continue to pay me or someone else to mount their new tires.

Before getting all mixed up with motorbikes, I was a fairly avid bicyclist. I think perhaps that experience with smaller tires and tubes really helped. Motorcycles are the exact same thing, just scaled up immensely. I've never pinched a motorcycle tube, probably because I got all my tube-pinching out of the way on bicycles at $4 a tube instead of $20. You have to learn the angles you can't exceed, and develop a sensitivity to trapped rubber.
 
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Zip ties! Haven’t used them to demount a tire yet, but they work great for mounting one. The last 705 I put on my Strom damn near fell on the rim! Do a search on YouTube. I thought it was a bunch of hooey when I heard about it, but trying it made me a believer.


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RuGlide is a spray bottle is even better. A light must of RuGlide in the right areas is all you need. I bet I use a teaspoon or less per tar.

after my NoMar tire lube got knocked I’ve and spilled on the floor I bought a gallon of RuGlide. A couple hundred tar later and I still have better than a 1/2 gallon.
 

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My typical tire lube is just dawn dish soap.
Dawn is a powerful detergent, not a soap, and detergents are extraordinarily corrosive to aluminum. I've dealt with the aftermath of misused dish detergent on vintage aluminum and steel motorcycle wheels many times.

On most modern motorcycles like V-Stroms, the alloy wheels are powder coated which is a pretty good barrier to corrosion from dish detergent. However, if there's a nick in the coating, the detergent can still get to the aluminum and create problems.

RuGlyde and other dedicated tire mounting lubricants are mild soaps with anti-corrosion additives that are safe on your wheels and on your tires, and they work a lot better than dish detergent solutions anyway. I'd encourage everyone mounting their own tires to invest the lousy $16 or $17 in what will likely be a lifetime supply of the correct lubricant.

You wouldn't just dump any old liquid into your engine or brakes, but for some reason harmful substitutes like detergents, WD-40, silicone spray, Pam, grease, Windex, furniture polish, shampoo, etc. are in common use when it comes to motorcycle tires.

If you just have to raid your kitchen cabinets for a substitute, a weak solution of Murphy's oil soap is probably the closest thing you might find at Walmart. Murphy's does make a version of their soap with the proper anti-corrosion additives specifically for tire mounting.
 

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9" lever/spoon are all you need to mount/dismount motorcycle tires and most passenger vehicle tires. Again it not the tool its technique. A longer lever increases the risk of damage from improper technique. If you are forcing a bead on/off a tire you are doing it wrong.

Heating tires, gobs of lube and gigantic tire irons are no match for proper technique.
Never underestimate the value of an extra-long tire iron, as more leverage in the tire-iron throwing contest !
 

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I use the No-Mar lube. Take some and thin it out in a pan on the stove with some water and then put it in a spray bottle.

A small paint brush to hit the drop centers, and a bit of spray on the rubber.
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Dawn is a powerful detergent, not a soap, and detergents are extraordinarily corrosive to aluminum. I've dealt with the aftermath of misused dish detergent on vintage aluminum and steel motorcycle wheels many times.

On most modern motorcycles like V-Stroms, the alloy wheels are powder coated which is a pretty good barrier to corrosion from dish detergent. However, if there's a nick in the coating, the detergent can still get to the aluminum and create problems.

RuGlyde and other dedicated tire mounting lubricants are mild soaps with anti-corrosion additives that are safe on your wheels and on your tires, and they work a lot better than dish detergent solutions anyway. I'd encourage everyone mounting their own tires to invest the lousy $16 or $17 in what will likely be a lifetime supply of the correct lubricant.

You wouldn't just dump any old liquid into your engine or brakes, but for some reason harmful substitutes like detergents, WD-40, silicone spray, Pam, grease, Windex, furniture polish, shampoo, etc. are in common use when it comes to motorcycle tires.

If you just have to raid your kitchen cabinets for a substitute, a weak solution of Murphy's oil soap is probably the closest thing you might find at Walmart. Murphy's does make a version of their soap with the proper anti-corrosion additives specifically for tire mounting.
Heck they don't even have to invest in a gallon jug. Just find someone local to them that bought a gallon and ask for a cup or two aka a lifetime supply if only changing tires for you and a couple buddies :). I know I'd surely spare some if someone is local.
 

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Sounds super scary. Been using dish soap on cars, trucks, trailers and bikes for years. But now you have me concerned that it is going to eat my aluminum pans . :p
 

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I only changed one tire myself and that's because it was still good when I gave up riding. I would have continued doing it and I'm
certain it would have gotten easier with practice.

All I used were the plastic Stubbies tire "irons." I was taking off a Shinko 705 and installing a Pilot Road 4 Trail.

It was a little work, but for one time only, I think I did alright. My reason for going with the Stubbies was to avoid scratching due to my inexperience. I didn't want to try tire changing and having the awful result of destroying the rim while learning. There are better tools for sure, but at a price.
 

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Search Mojo tire blocks and No Mar
+1

They about double the cost of the HF changer, well worth it though.

If you have irons cut up some milk type jugs use them for rim protectors.
Be sure the tire bead is broken all the way around on both sides.

I've reverted to irons on my HF changer a couple of times in frustration. Got the mojo blocks and lever no more red paint on the rims!
 

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Discussion Starter #34
It looks like you are trying to get the old tire OFF, is that correct? It also looks like the bead has not been "broken" yet, is that true? (Maybe I'm just not seeing it well in the picture.) I have the same HF tire changer, and it has a bead-breaking attachment on the side that will press down on the inner area of the tire just at the edge of the wheel rim, to push the bead towards the center of the wheel, making it loose so you can then use the bar or spoons to lever the tire over the rim.

If you haven't done motorcycle tires before (maybe you have so I don't want to insult you, sorry) but the wheel "valley" where the opposing bead has to go to get room to angle the tire up over the top rim, is a lot narrower than on a steel-rimmed car tire.

Think "out of the box" for minute and here's a trick everybody laughs at but trust me it works slicker than deer guts:

Once you get the beads (top and bottom) broken loose from the rim, take a razor knife/box cutter/K-bar or what ever you have, put a little oil or Ru-Glyde on the blade, and cut the tire all the way around the center of the tread. That way you won't have to fight the opposing bead at all. You can pull the upper bead you are trying to get over the rim up and over really easy. I have been close a couple of times to being able to pull it off by hand, once I get it started, depending on the stiffness of your tire casing. Plenty of Ru-Glyde on the beads for both removal and install.

When putting the new tire on, make yourself some kind of little tent that you can out the tire in with a spcae heater if you have one and get it good and warm. Warm rubber stretches better than frozen rubber.

Hope that helps, and good luck.
Well I like the idea of cutting. I put a few types of hard tubing around the rim and raised it enough to grind off the metal bands of the bead wall. Heh heh. Ill bet some guys are shaking their heads right now. This tire is going on and my rims not getting scratched by Jesus. I have spent just about enough money on shit this last year, every time I turn around its something another tool or something around the house broken. Im tired of the solution being buy more crap. Everyones suggestions are correct, the motion pro rim protector, the MOJO lever and MOJO blocks would be the ticket but I dont currently have them so... Its going on dammit
 

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And now you have a decorative tree ring!!!
 
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I just use hand tools, motion pro aluminum bead breakers and a pair of motion pro 11“ steel irons. Watched this video a half dozen times, it’s all right there (except I don’t do the kickstand trick):
The first time I tried to use homemade milk jug protectors. Waste of time, I’ll accept a few tiny scratches.
 
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