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Discussion Starter #1
So apologies if there is another thread like this, I searched for awhile but didn't see anything. Basically I'm trying to put a fresh 705 on the 2005 1k and I'm gouging the bejesus out of the rim with my harbor freight crap. Yes I know you get what you pay for. I tried the milk jug plastic over the bar end, it doesn't stay. Allz I have to do is threaten the wheel with a tool and the rim has a fresh gouge. Im in the northeast and my garage is like 55 right now,, so im going to have to work it a bit to get it on there. 20210219_211131.jpg 20210219_211144.jpg What is everyone using to change their tires? Is there a tip anyone has to use what I've got? Would an aluminum spoon work better, and where can I get one inexpensively? Just did a set of snow tires on steel rims last weekend and it went fine. The Strom rim is a little more delicate, it seems. Thanks in advance
 

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I just use Motion Pro tire irons. If you don't want to scratch your rims, use Motion Pro Rim Protectors, or else get the plastic tire irons from Stubby Tools. I've used them, and while they don't scratch the rims, I'm not overly fond of them. The rim protectors actually clip onto the rim so they don't move around while you're manipulating the tire; they work better than makeshift protectors like pieces of milk containers.

This video shows a tire change. If you skip ahead to 2:10 on the video, it'll show you the rim protectors.


The ones in the video are from Motion Pro; I use a different style (also available from Motion Pro) that look like this:
rim protectors.jpg


Other companies make similar rim protectors; I think I have them from both Motion Pro and Tusk.
 

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If the tire is warmed up, it goes on much easier. Simple way to warm it up (if the warm sun is not shining) is to put a hair dryer inside the tire and then cover the tire up. Getting the tire off the cold concrete helps as well. Leave it for about 20 minutes or so and you will find it goes on a lot easier.
Another vote here for the Motion Pro rim protectors.
 

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It looks like you are trying to get the old tire OFF, is that correct? It also looks like the bead has not been "broken" yet, is that true? (Maybe I'm just not seeing it well in the picture.) I have the same HF tire changer, and it has a bead-breaking attachment on the side that will press down on the inner area of the tire just at the edge of the wheel rim, to push the bead towards the center of the wheel, making it loose so you can then use the bar or spoons to lever the tire over the rim.

If you haven't done motorcycle tires before (maybe you have so I don't want to insult you, sorry) but the wheel "valley" where the opposing bead has to go to get room to angle the tire up over the top rim, is a lot narrower than on a steel-rimmed car tire.

Think "out of the box" for minute and here's a trick everybody laughs at but trust me it works slicker than deer guts:

Once you get the beads (top and bottom) broken loose from the rim, take a razor knife/box cutter/K-bar or what ever you have, put a little oil or Ru-Glyde on the blade, and cut the tire all the way around the center of the tread. That way you won't have to fight the opposing bead at all. You can pull the upper bead you are trying to get over the rim up and over really easy. I have been close a couple of times to being able to pull it off by hand, once I get it started, depending on the stiffness of your tire casing. Plenty of Ru-Glyde on the beads for both removal and install.

When putting the new tire on, make yourself some kind of little tent that you can out the tire in with a spcae heater if you have one and get it good and warm. Warm rubber stretches better than frozen rubber.

Hope that helps, and good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
It looks like you are trying to get the old tire OFF, is that correct? It also looks like the bead has not been "broken" yet, is that true? (Maybe I'm just not seeing it well in the picture.) I have the same HF tire changer, and it has a bead-breaking attachment on the side that will press down on the inner area of the tire just at the edge of the wheel rim, to push the bead towards the center of the wheel, making it loose so you can then use the bar or spoons to lever the tire over the rim.

If you haven't done motorcycle tires before (maybe you have so I don't want to insult you, sorry) but the wheel "valley" where the opposing bead has to go to get room to angle the tire up over the top rim, is a lot narrower than on a steel-rimmed car tire.

Think "out of the box" for minute and here's a trick everybody laughs at but trust me it works slicker than deer guts:

Once you get the beads (top and bottom) broken loose from the rim, take a razor knife/box cutter/K-bar or what ever you have, put a little oil or Ru-Glyde on the blade, and cut the tire all the way around the center of the tread. That way you won't have to fight the opposing bead at all. You can pull the upper bead you are trying to get over the rim up and over really easy. I have been close a couple of times to being able to pull it off by hand, once I get it started, depending on the stiffness of your tire casing. Plenty of Ru-Glyde on the beads for both removal and install.

When putting the new tire on, make yourself some kind of little tent that you can out the tire in with a spcae heater if you have one and get it good and warm. Warm rubber stretches better than frozen rubber.

Hope that helps, and good luck.
Yes, bead is broken. I can get the tire off if I wanted, I just don't want to destroy the rim. I've done tires on my klr which was miserable, my gsxr which wasn't awful, but the metal on the vstrom rim just seems to melt off in contact with a steel spoon. Yes, tires go on alot easier warm. I appreciate everyone's input
 

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I have not done my tires yet but plan on doing so in the near future. One tip I am considering is to take some paracord, large zip ties or something and use them to squeeze the sides/beads of the tire together. That should/could make it easier to keep the bead in the center of the wheel while getting the opposite end over the rim. Anybody experience with this?

Motion Pro bead breaker tire irons and the rim protectors are on my shopping list.
 

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I have not done my tires yet but plan on doing so in the near future. One tip I am considering is to take some paracord, large zip ties or something and use them to squeeze the sides/beads of the tire together. That should/could make it easier to keep the bead in the center of the wheel while getting the opposite end over the rim. Anybody experience with this?

Motion Pro bead breaker tire irons and the rim protectors are on my shopping list.
I've tried stuff like the zip tie method, and found it to be way more trouble than it's worth. It"s a lot less effort to just kneel on the tire to push the sidewall into the center channel while you work that side of the tire onto the rim. It's always easier to mount a tire when it's warm, but I've mounted tires in the winter when they were just warmed up by letting them sit in the house for a couple hours.

That video I posted earlier in this thread is what got me started changing my own tires; those techniques are really effective if you do them correctly. They work even on stiff sidewalls like the bias ply E07's.

l
 

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1st thing, get the rim protectors. There are the Motion Pro variety. I seem to have the best luck with these.

282755



Then make a cardboard tire oven. Set tire on little wooden blocks and put cardboard box over the top. Cut a hole in the top of the cardboard and insert the WalMart $9.99 hair dryer. Ignition.

Bake at 130 degrees for half an hour. Some of those bias ply tires are TOUGH !

282754



Of course (in the summer), you can simply lay the tire in the sun to warm it up. An asphalt driveway is the snizzle for that.

A good tire lube is also very handy - and some little wooden blocks cut from 1x2's to put opposite the tire tool, in order to keep the tire down in the drop center.
 

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So apologies if there is another thread like this, I searched for awhile but didn't see anything. Basically I'm trying to put a fresh 705 on the 2005 1k and I'm gouging the bejesus out of the rim with my harbor freight crap. Yes I know you get what you pay for. I tried the milk jug plastic over the bar end, it doesn't stay. Allz I have to do is threaten the wheel with a tool and the rim has a fresh gouge. Im in the northeast and my garage is like 55 right now,, so im going to have to work it a bit to get it on there. View attachment 282749 View attachment 282750 What is everyone using to change their tires? Is there a tip anyone has to use what I've got? Would an aluminum spoon work better, and where can I get one inexpensively? Just did a set of snow tires on steel rims last weekend and it went fine. The Strom rim is a little more delicate, it seems. Thanks in advance
It's not the HF stuff usually, it's your technique. I used HF for many years changing tires on 3 bikes + some friends bikes with not marring. There are many videos on-line to review. It takes patience but you quickly gain the skill to zip right thru it. I did by a MOJO lever eventually. Hang in there, you'll get it. Some here will rip HF stuff I know.
 

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I just use Motion Pro tire irons. If you don't want to scratch your rims, use Motion Pro Rim Protectors, or else get the plastic tire irons from Stubby Tools. I've used them, and while they don't scratch the rims, I'm not overly fond of them. The rim protectors actually clip onto the rim so they don't move around while you're manipulating the tire; they work better than makeshift protectors like pieces of milk containers.

Other companies make similar rim protectors; I think I have them from both Motion Pro and Tusk.
RCinNC, I am curious about the highly acclaimed Mo Pro bead breaker spoons. Do they live up to the hype that says they make breaking the bead a walk-in-the-park. Truth? I'm looking for another set of spoons and want to know if they are worth the money. Thoughts?
 

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Are they aluminum spoons, or steel? I have some 2 foot steel spoons, and they have a SLIGHT contour or raised ridge and they are taking a nice bite out of the rim.
Steel. Consider that you may be working against the tire too much. If the opposite side of tire is not in drop them you are trying to stretch the bead.
 

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RCinNC, I am curious about the highly acclaimed Mo Pro bead breaker spoons. Do they live up to the hype that says they make breaking the bead a walk-in-the-park. Truth? I'm looking for another set of spoons and want to know if they are worth the money. Thoughts?
I've never used them, Yarz;. I just have their regular motorcycle tire irons in a couple different lengths. I use their Bead Popper to break the bead. It's just a wedge you hammer into the spot where the tire meets the rim. I don't think they make it any more.
 

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9" lever/spoon are all you need to mount/dismount motorcycle tires and most passenger vehicle tires. Again it not the tool its technique. A longer lever increases the risk of damage from improper technique. If you are forcing a bead on/off a tire you are doing it wrong.

Heating tires, gobs of lube and gigantic tire irons are no match for proper technique.
 
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