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Looking to pickup a 650 this weekend and transport in truck bed. Visually it looks like the lower triple tree tie down points will not work due to potential contact with the body pieces. Can anyone confirm this? If so, are the side black frame/engine a good tie down point or too far back? Or would up on the bars be best to avoid issues. There are no crash bars on the bike.
 

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I have trailered hundreds of bikes and to me there is 2 very important things,

1; the front wheel can't be allowed to turn side to side or slip to the side, if either of these things happen the straps can come loose.

2; the hooks on the straps should be secured in some way so that even if they become slack they will stay in place, a loose strap is better than no strap.

I have cut the seatbelts out of many old cars, you can melt holes in them for hooks to go into and make loops, this works with rule 2, the hooks will never fall out of a seatbelt strap.

The trailer has as much to do with the strap positions as the bike does, the ideal place to secure to the trailer may not suit the bike or the other way around.

Always strap down the rear too, it stops the bike bouncing around and coming through the rear of the tow vehicle should you run up the back of the car in front on the way home.

EDIT. on my trailers I have drilled holes to put my hooks in, the hooks will not fall out of my holes, if I was to use the trailers rail or loops the hook could easily come out or off and that would break rule 2.
 
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I don't put my bikes into a trailer very often, but I have done it several times.

The closed-loop straps that cinch around the the lower triple clamp have always worked well for me. No interference with any body panels and very secure.

As far as fork seals go, I don't get the fear of blowing them. If you cinch the forks down about a third of their travel you are only putting the springs under tension, there is no build up of pressure behind the seals. And a third of the way compressed is about the same amount of compression you put on them when you sit down on your bike to ride, no? I just can't see the problem.

Seems if you end up with a leaking seal after trailering, you had already incurred your seal damage before.

...............shu
 

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In the photo above I would use a D shackle or even some tape on the hook's opening so if the strap came loose the hook could not fall out of the loop.

Better a loose strap than no strap for me.
 
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In the photo above I would use a D shackle or even some tape on the hook's opening so if the strap came loose the hook could not fall out of the loop.

Better a loose strap than no strap for me.
It can't come loose when hooked up like that.
 

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It's the same situation on the rear and I know that can come loose if the lock on the tiedown gives any.
 

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It's the same situation on the rear and I know that can come loose if the lock on the tiedown gives any.
You guys are probably correct, I should get some D-rings. I will say the tie-down kit is what came with the trailer, so the vendor must believe it to be ok. But better safe than sorry for the sake of $10 bucks.
 

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FYI, those of you considering a more permanent (and regular) way to transport bikes, I'd recommend the Pitbull Trailer Restraint System:
Automotive tire Wood Bicycle tire Gas Road surface


Roll the bike in, lock it down, you're good to go. I've put a couple thousand down with this setup.
It's a bit more permanent than what's being discussed here, but options are never a bad thing
Hope this helps someone
 

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You guys are probably correct, I should get some D-rings. I will say the tie-down kit is what came with the trailer, so the vendor must believe it to be ok. But better safe than sorry for the sake of $10 bucks.
Or just a few minutes with a roll of tape, put some around the hooks opening.

Tape is a lot cheaper than a bike falling over would be.

Most tiedowns now come with closing hooks or two hooks back to back to prevent them coming unhooked.

It looks like the rear strap is hooked to the panier frame, I would not recommend that, the rear of the bike can get a real bounce up on rough surfaces and that could be enough the bend a panier frame, get to the bikes frame or rear wheel.
 
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