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Click on the below link for this very well done and complete procedure, pay close attention to EVERYTHING the author states. Good luck, and as always......proceed at your own risk!!!!!


Suzuki V-Strom DL650 Valve Check and Adjustment
 

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Really good write-up, thanks Big B..:thumbup:
 

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That "feel" thing takes a lot of practice to get consistent. It's good to use the go-no go of the next smaller and larger gauges too. Then you can be a bit more sure of your accuracy.
The quality and shape of your gauges can make a difference too.
 

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Nice, finally I get some ideas how this is done, I guess with some noted concerns since I never done a bike valve adjustment I'm wondering how that rear tensioner bolt & spring get put back up in such a precarious position. Don't think your fat fingers are gonna make that trip...:>) This is a keeper for sure.

Thank you Big B

EJ
 

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Quote:

To make access much easier I also remove the entire front end 'cockpit' in one lump (not necessary on the earlier Generation 1 models). Once you've got the tank and side panels off there are only two bolts and three electrical connectors securing the cockpit so better to spend another ten minutes removing the whole thing as it really makes the job much easier.

On my k9 650, what is the cockpit?

In that pic, the whole front end seems to be one piece, like an old fairing?
So, on my k9 650, the guages, headlights etc all have to come off?
 

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As a side note I have been thought the "feel" on a feeler gauge should feel like you are peeling a piece of scotch tape off a pane of glass.
I'm into this project now (might wrap it up tomorrow), and a video I saw, or I read something somewhere, that said the "feel" of a feeler gage should be like that of pulling a sheet of paper from between two glossy magazines. I guess that's similar to pulling tape off glass. Either way, it's not much force.

And that's the key. On my bike, especially on the exhaust valves, I could get a (relatively) wide range of feeler gage blades into the gaps. I don't know if it's possible I was slightly compressing the valve springs with some of the thicker blades that I could push in - or not.

Decided that I'd probably, initially, used too-thick blades, which would go in the gap, but were very, or rather, hard to push in and pull out. Had to re-do the rear cylinder, installing even thinner shims.

Would love to hear more comments about what the right "feel" of the gages is.
 

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I pretty much wrapped this valve-adjustment job up today.

Rode the bike home shortly after lunch. The valves, exhausts, especially, should be much "looser" now. I moved them roughly 0.010 inches. A bunch. Don't have my records in front of me, but I ended up moving the exhausts a lot.

Bike started instantly and idles and pulls well. I might now be hearing a gentle tic-tic-tic at idle (an indication of exhaust valves on the loose side of nominal?), but it doesn't sound bad, maybe just a tiny bit different.

Rode the bike across a steep mountain road to home. Opened it up on a long, steep upgrade. She pulled hard and felt fine.

Maybe change oil this PM, then lube the chain, gas up and ride a week or two, then maybe bleed the brakes. That should do it for awhile.
 

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@HokiesRWee

I did an adjustment on my 2014 Wee back in December. The bike only had about 7K miles (bought it with 3K) and the exhausts were at the limit (0.20mm) so I opened them up to the wide limit (0.30mm). The intakes were in the middle of the spec so I left them alone. After the adjustment I could hear the tic-tic-tic at idle and it also seemed to start easier and idle better, not that these were a problem before the adjustment. Seems to pull harder but that could just be my imagination.
 

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Glad this has become a good resource for folks, although I'm still having a local very well respected/trusted mechanic do mine. :)
 

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I just finished doing the valves on my 2004 Wee, using this very article as a resource......good photos, very helpful. All eight shims had to be replaced to one a bit thinner. Luckily, my local bike shop was very kind enough to loan me their shim selection for a few days......they are mainly into sleds these days, so no hardship on their part. But still, support your local shops, it will pay dividends down the road.


Naturally, replaced the spark plugs, antifreeze, & oil and filter while the body parts had been excavated.
 

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I just read through this linked article and it is a really good guide for anyone who is gearing up to do a valve check/adjustment. My only comment on the procedure is that I would not use so much gasket sealant on the half-moons. It is not necessary and once dried it is difficult to clean on the next service and you risk tearing or marring the gasket which is reusable if handled with care. Also, the next time you pull the cover a small chunk could break off and get into the motor. This actually happened when I did my recent valve adjust since the previous mechanic gooped up the half-moons with sealant. I had to spend some time carefully cleaning the gasket and fishing chunks of sealant that fell into the crevices of the cylinder head. If you don't catch these they could circulate with the oil and possibly plug an oil passage or oil jet or could wedge the cam chain tensioner mechanism. When I button up the valve covers I just use a tiny bit of sealant at the corner of the half-moons (circled in red in the second picture) which is where they are prone to leak so that is all you need seal. I usually apply it with a toothpick or an opened paper clip and I put a small stripe of sealant right in the corner, no need to slather it on as shown in this picture.
 

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" I was wondering what Scotch had to do with valve adjustments and why you would need to peel it."

Scotch is what I have while a very capable mechanic friend does the check and adjustment of my valves. He does this stuff for a living and i don't have to second guess myself.>:)
 

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Couple of questions about having the dealer do a valve check on my 2013 Wee Adventure...never had it done. I'm a decent wrench but after looking through the tutorial, this is something I'll pay to have done...

I've seen quotes of slightly north of $600 to have it done. I'm assuming the majority of that is labor getting all the tupperware removed and the tank removed...shims, if it needs some, shouldn't be uber-expensive, right?

Is it worth it (at least for labor costs) for me to do all the panel removal and tank removal at home and just trailer the bike down to the dealer? I'm assuming they'll want to run the bike after they're done, especially if they have to add or subtract any shims...so I'd have to take all the panels and tank with me so THEY could reassemble, correct?

Finally, do they have to crack open the cooling system (to move the radiator, etc.) to do the valve check? Good idea to do valves and cooling system flush/recharge at the same time?

Thanks, mateys! :ROFLMAO:
 

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Look over the referenced tutorial. It states that the cooler needs to come off. Yes it needs to come off to have proper access to the front Cylinder.
I never removed the whole cockpit for the valve job, but that may be preference of the writer of the tutorial and he may do other maintenance at the same time.




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Regarding removing bodywork prior to delivering the bike to a repair shop, I'd say ask them first. In so far as the rest of the maintenance tasks go, if you do the whole thing yourself, you will know what got replaced/cleaned/adjusted during the process.
For those of us who own bikes for the pleasure of working on them, and occasionally riding them, valves are the type of job that you may only do once while you own that bike, and therefore, may be the only time that spark plugs, antifreeze, broken fasteners, and general cleanup gets taken care of.
Winters are for jobs of this type......immerse yourself in the task for a few days, do a bit at a time, think about the next step while sitting staring at the bike (clutching a cup of coffee or scotch, your preference).
 
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