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We've got a fleet of 12 Wees and had three go down last year and bent Givi crash bars (engine guards). The bars did their job. They are somewhat sacrificial and absorb much of the impact, sparing considerable damage, but bend pretty much flush with the tupperwear in the process.

Needless to say replacing the bars with new is an expensive proposition, and there isn't a ton of suggestions out there on how to unbend them easily. I've sought advice on this forum.

I brought my Dominican mechanic up yesterday to help do a bunch of pre-season maintenance and repairs. One of the tasks was to be unbending 4 bent Givi crash bars. The plan was to park the bike between two strong reinforced concrete poles, securing the frame with a strong nylon tow strap, attaching the bent bar with a strap to a "come-along" attached to another pole and then carefully winching the bar to the original position.

Dominican mechanics are not like American mechanics. They don't have a bunch of tool, they don't have workshops and they don't replace things, they repair things (I had a rear windshield wiper go bad on my Montero. In the US we'd replace the motor assembly for $125+. Not here. He took the armature out, rewound it and filed bushing from rawstock to replace the original...perfectly...for under $10.) I joke that a Dominican mechanic could build a Space Shuttle with a bag of concrete, a busted moto and odds and ends from the street.

He said my method would work well. He had a better idea. So we tried it.

It worked. We bent all four bars in under 40 minutes.

Here is the process. Excuse the pics, it's at night in a carport and the photographer didn't know I was going to write a step-by-step report. But you'll get the idea.

First of all, put the bike next to a strong pole, take a jack-stand (or something similar, maybe a piece of 4x4 or something), extend it between the pole and the lower bar, and strap it tightly to the bike with a towing strap:


Attach a strap with a come-along winch to the top bar close to the bent part, attach to another immovable point (we had another pole but anything could do), have someone hold the bike steady (our helper sat on the bike and push away from the pole), slowly winch the bent bar until in it's original position:


Worked perfectly. Quick. Easy. Effective.

The Dominican way.

4 bent bars. 40 minutes. Awesome.:thumbup::hurray:
 

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We've got a fleet of 12 Wees and had three go down last year and bent Givi crash bars (engine guards). The bars did their job. They are somewhat sacrificial and absorb much of the impact, sparing considerable damage, but bend pretty much flush with the tupperwear in the process.

Needless to say replacing the bars with new is an expensive proposition, and there isn't a ton of suggestions out there on how to unbend them easily. I've sought advice on this forum.

I brought my Dominican mechanic up yesterday to help do a bunch of pre-season maintenance and repairs. One of the tasks was to be unbending 4 bent Givi crash bars. The plan was to park the bike between two strong reinforced concrete poles, securing the frame with a strong nylon tow strap, attaching the bent bar with a strap to a "come-along" attached to another pole and then carefully winching the bar to the original position.

Dominican mechanics are not like American mechanics. They don't have a bunch of tool, they don't have workshops and they don't replace things, they repair things (I had a rear windshield wiper go bad on my Montero. In the US we'd replace the motor assembly for $125+. Not here. He took the armature out, rewound it and filed bushing from rawstock to replace the original...perfectly...for under $10.) I joke that a Dominican mechanic could build a Space Shuttle with a bag of concrete, a busted moto and odds and ends from the street.

He said my method would work well. He had a better idea. So we tried it.

It worked. We bent all four bars in under 40 minutes.

Here is the process. Excuse the pics, it's at night in a carport and the photographer didn't know I was going to write a step-by-step report. But you'll get the idea.

First of all, put the bike next to a strong pole, take a jack-stand (or something similar, maybe a piece of 4x4 or something), extend it between the pole and the lower bar, and strap it tightly to the bike with a towing strap:


Attach a strap with a come-along winch to the top bar close to the bent part, attach to another immovable point (we had another pole but anything could do), have someone hold the bike steady (our helper sat on the bike and push away from the pole), slowly winch the bent bar until in it's original position:


Worked perfectly. Quick. Easy. Effective.

The Dominican way.

4 bent bars. 40 minutes. Awesome.:thumbup::hurray:
I did that last year with the only difference being I used two trees. Givis also. Worked like a charm but you need two guys for sure. I pulled mine apart about an inch more that they were stock as I felt they were too close to the bike. They are just far enough apart to put my leg up on top for a little stretch on a long trip.
 

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Pretty darn slick way to do things. You can get away without the come along by using a good strap and just applying body weight to the center point between the ends. The longer the strap the easier it is.
 

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Thanks for the post!

My right side Givi is bent and I really had no idea how to go about straightening it.

:thumbup:
Bending back just one side is a little different. Mine were uneven by about an inch so what I did was place the nylon strap down low on the side that I didn't want to bend out and on the other side I placed the strap as high and out toward the front wheel as I could. It worked out fine that way.
 

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Yikes, I'm a little worried about this method, at least when the bars have been severely bent out of shape. If you have your mind made up to not replace the bars outright then its better than leaving them crumpled or simply removing, but think about it. What happens when you bend a paperclip back and forth? The area that bends gets hot, it becomes easier to bend, and eventually it breaks. Metal that's bent out of shape is much weaker than it originally was since the point at which it bends becomes subject to microscopic fissures and fractures, as well as increased stress in the bonded metals making it more brittle. It's a process that can only be fixed by proper re-heating, re-forging process (to re-bond the stressed/fractured areas), and tempering. The next time the bike goes down the bars aren't likely to protect the bike as well as the first time. If you know the alloy composition in the bars and the tempering process used by the factory, a competent and knowledgeable blacksmith or someone else specialized in metallurgy with the right equipment might be able to work them to be almost as good as new, but that's going out on a limb. If you can afford it, I urge you to replace the bars outright. If not, though, at least the re-bent bars will offer some additional protection.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
WT, I spoke with a Givi Tech Rep today about this. I'm told that Givi has no "single use" policy on their crash bars; in fact he seemed a little puzzled by the question. Seems folks rebend minor problems all the time, although there is no guarantee of the same exact strength. But I feel comfortable that the "fixed" bars are close to the original "give" based on the effort to bend them back 1-1.5." It's not like moving a paper clip back and forth 90 degrees over and over.

He did say he would recommend replacement if a 1) a crease on the tubes is visible, 2) if the powdercoating is flaked off or 3) if the brackets or bolts are damaged: those would indicate extreme force having been applied. Our case is simple drops on the side, not complex crashes. Makes sense to me.
 

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Ok, Scootertrash, I'll buy that. I'm used to thinking of much greater forces and upset, or more extreme drops. Small amounts of bend should only cause a small decrease in strength, which shouldn't affect the protection of the bars too much. Though if repeated several times, the bars are going to go soft, of course.
 

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after a crash last year my givi bars were bent right next to the plastic, but the bars saved the bodywork from any damage.

I brought the bike to a metal fab shop. The guy looked at it and first tried to bend it back using a piece of straight metal. But that did not work so he fabbed up a small addition to the bar- making s kind of hook in the end of the bar which allowed the leverage to bend the bars back in shape.

I wish I had taken pics. It was amazing watching him work- 20 minutes to fab a tool to do the job, 3 minutes to bend.

The bars seem as sturdy as new. Besides the vibration when I first installed them (fixed with bb's) I really like these bars.
 

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The bar was bent to formed the shape in the first place. I do agree the bars should be checked for signs of stress at the attachment lugs or welds, but I feel that this "cold forming" will give a usefull result.

Much like the motor bushing filed to shape, not perfect, but perfect costs more.
Good luck
 

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Yikes, I'm a little worried about this method, at least when the bars have been severely bent out of shape. If you have your mind made up to not replace the bars outright then its better than leaving them crumpled or simply removing, but think about it. What happens when you bend a paperclip back and forth? The area that bends gets hot, it becomes easier to bend, and eventually it breaks. Metal that's bent out of shape is much weaker than it originally was since the point at which it bends becomes subject to microscopic fissures and fractures, as well as increased stress in the bonded metals making it more brittle. It's a process that can only be fixed by proper re-heating, re-forging process (to re-bond the stressed/fractured areas), and tempering. The next time the bike goes down the bars aren't likely to protect the bike as well as the first time. If you know the alloy composition in the bars and the tempering process used by the factory, a competent and knowledgeable blacksmith or someone else specialized in metallurgy with the right equipment might be able to work them to be almost as good as new, but that's going out on a limb. If you can afford it, I urge you to replace the bars outright. If not, though, at least the re-bent bars will offer some additional protection.
I hope you are not serious. If you are--you should see a shrink (quickly).
 
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