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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, all.

I am 250 lbs right now, but am hoping to slim down in the next few months (obviously I will still be quite heavy!). I am not an aggressive rider, and won't be doing any hard off road (just non-technical trails and gravel roads). There is already a fork brace installed.

Would a spring upgrade be worth it for me? If I were to do the rear suspension, it would just be a new spring as compared to a full shock replacement. I am not interested in adding cartridges or anything like that to the front at this time. The sag has not been set yet, but I am pretty sure I won't be able to set it correctly at my weight with the stock suspension.

Thanks for your opinion. I am new to this suspension stuff! :confused:
 

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I installed Sonic .95 fork springs and 15 weight oil (I think that was Sonic recommendation). I had no problem setting the sag, but wanted less brake dive and something a little more sporty for the twisties. I was very happy with that, but if I had to do it over I would try a 10 wt. oil to make it a little more "plush" riding. I was happy with the stock rear after adjusting. I'm right around 200 lbs with gear, and was 100% street.
 

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Like Gdub said, front springs and oil will help. If you truly are not an aggressive rider you may not even notice much difference. But for your weight, both front and rear should be re-sprung to make the bike handle properly.

I'm 230-ish & I would say "properly aggressive" lol, so I had a complete suspension makeover for about $650. The handling of the bike is night an day from stock
 

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I am 230ish also. At the moment heading lower, but until I hit 199 again that is all conjecture.....

Springs will help. You will also need to experiment with fork oil. Because you don't want to go the route of adding cartridge emulators, you will probably want a thinner than stock oil to try first. Otherwise I think you will find the front harsh on smaller bumps. But the springs will make a very positive difference. I have springs and cartridge emulators in the front, but have done nothing to the rear. While I don't doubt the rear would benefit, I don't ride two up much and the preload seems to take care of sag pretty well.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
That all makes sense.

Maybe if I had a properly sprung bike I could become more aggressive! I will try to set the sag first to see where I am at. I don't think the previous owner changed out any springs, but best to make sure.

Thanks for the opinions. It looks like I will go ahead and play a bit with some upgrades.
 

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I changed to .90 Sonic springs just because of braking nose dive and it helped a lot.
 

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If you want to ride 2-Up or haul a bunch of gear, you'll probably want a stronger rear spring. I am in a similar weight situation (except my bike is the '14 DL1000). Everything runs pretty good when I'm alone with my 250lbs. I can get the front sag set correctly, but the rear sag, even with the preload maxed out, was riding too low. But it only seemed to bother that engineering part of me that knew it should optimally be riding a little higher.

Where it really made a difference was with my wife on the back. Then it seemed that we had almost no rear travel at all before bottoming out and rebounding hard.

There are a couple of shops around the USA that can supply you with a swap out spring for the rear shock for around $125 USD or so. It is very easy to change on the '14 DL1000 (if you have spring compressors).

If I recall correctly, the stock rear spring (at least on the DL1000) is about 600lb/in (10.7kg/mm). and I swapped it out for an 800 lb/in (14.3kg/mm). But don't quote me on that...

Much improved all around and I get the correct solo ride height (sag) with the pre-load at nearly zero, which gives me all of the adjustment in the upwards direction where I need it. When I carry a passenger or gear, I just crank up the pre-load all the way and bottoming out is MUCH reduced.
 

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'06 Vee. I went with Sonic Springs and fresh oil. It helps quite a bit. Last spring I had Sasquatch Suspension in Idaho rebuild my shock and I put on a new spring. This made an even bigger difference. I have ridden the bike off road and it did great (gravel and dirt roads, some less than wonderful, but no single track or real sketchy two track). On road it's terrific. I'm 250+.
I've never regretted money spent on suspension. In fact, the more I spend, the better I feel about it. A well set up bike is so nice.
If you can hit your sag numbers then you might not need anything but if you can't, start with front springs and oil. And maybe valve if they are in the budget. Try Cogent Dynamics if you don't want to drill your damper rods as per Gold Valves from Race Tech. Gold Valves are more tunable but you have to be dedicated.
 

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I am in the same weight range and my DL has HT pannier racks and Pelican 1550 cases to add an additional 40+lbs unloaded. I have the stock springs with a fork brace and ATF as for fluid. I have no issues with the stock springs. I ride lots of twisties in WV and can drag the pegs with confidence. I would like to add a set of Ricor's to help with fork dive.

Unless you are bottoming out all the time or hauling a pillion I wouldn't worry with new springs.
 

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I had a complete suspension makeover for about $650. The handling of the bike is night an day from stock
Not to get into a lot of detail, what vendor did you use and what spring ratings are you using now? It would be fine if you can link me to a previous post of yours rather than rewrite. THX
 
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