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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I am a prospective V-strom buyer and I have a question. It might
be a oddball question, but I will ask it anyway. Is there a conversion to
change the bike from chain drive to belt drive?
If so, has anyone done it and how are the results.
Thanks for not laughing.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Drive belt modification

Thank you for the reply. Very interesting. Shame about the price though.
Too bad someone in this country can't come up with this belt mod.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
I will sve others the time ....... it's $1,400 from Germany, NOT INSTALLED. I think that with the instant popularity of this bike there will be cheaper mods in the near future soon so don't let a little chain oil on the rear wheel stop you from a purchase of a suberb bike! :D
 
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Discussion Starter #5
I don't do dirt and gravel. I use my DL1000 on pavement 98 percent of the time. I don't like chains or chain maintenance. Been happily riding shafties for the last 20 years.

But, I didn't let that stop me from buying the DL1000. I don't get too carried away with chain maintenance either. I lube it once in awhile. I cleaned it once. I adjusted it once (a very small amount). I have 7500 miles on it now. If my chain wears out a couple of thousand miles earlier than it would if I took better care of it - so be it. I bought the bike to ride - not as a chain maintenance exercise.

I don't think I'd spend the money on the belt drive conversion though. There are better ways to spend money on this bike. Luggage, centerstand, aftermarket seat, nicer mirrors, better windscreen, case guards, suspension upgrades, better tires, etc. would all fall higher on my wish list than a belt drive conversion. It's not that the bike needs all of that right away, but each thing you do over time makes it a nicer ride.
 

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I was considering a BMW GS because of the shaft drive. A friend of mine was quick to point out that IF the shaft drive fails, it's going to be expensive and probably not able to be repaired on the side of the road. A chain is relatively inexpensive and you can carry a spare and tools to change it on the side of the road if it fails. As it turns out, the new GS appears to be suffering from some final drive issues and my friend is a genius.
 

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sterfry said:
I was considering a BMW GS because of the shaft drive. A friend of mine was quick to point out that IF the shaft drive fails, it's going to be expensive and probably not able to be repaired on the side of the road. A chain is relatively inexpensive and you can carry a spare and tools to change it on the side of the road if it fails. As it turns out, the new GS appears to be suffering from some final drive issues and my friend is a genius.
I have a 12 year old VS1400 with beaucoup miles on it and the shaft drive, other than normal annual lubrication checks and changes, is the only part that has never been serviced. In fact I can't recall a single failure on any shaft drive I have ever owned. On the other hand, I can't even tell you how many belts, chains, sprockets, tensioners, etc etc I have had to replace over the last 40 years of riding, but I'll bet if you melted them all down you could build a fullsize pickup truck from the metal and rubber.
The Vicar
 
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Discussion Starter #9
I have had five Japanese motorcycles with shaft drive. No reliability issues. BMW pursues different shaft drive technology and design in an effort to minimise the shaft drive's effect on ride and handling. These designs have sometimes been prone to failure. I had a friend who ate a $2000 repair bill on his BMW K75 when the splines wore out. Those splines had to be lubricated at least annually too, so there was maintenance involved. On the Japanese bikes you pretty much forget the shaft drive is there. You don't think about it any more than you do the driveshaft on your car.

You can never forget about a chain. It requires lubing, occassional cleaning and adjustment, and it will require replacement periodically along with the sprockets. If you keep a chain drive bike and rack up a lot of miles on it, there is certainly an expense associated with the chain drive.
For that you get lighter weight, and slightly better handling characteristics.

Overall, I prefer shaft drive. But you have to consider the whole motorcycle. The V-Strom offered other things I wanted at a price that seemed reasonable. So I put up with the chain drive. I will most likely go back to a shaft drive sport touring bike the next time around, but that won't be in the near future.
 

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HMM

hey to each his own, I was/am a DIRT rider first. I like chains, they are simple, cheap, and easy to fix. maint is pretty low, just clean/oil and adjust the tension. Yeah I can see shaft drive as being ok for street use, but it makes counter shaft sprocket changes a PITA. as for belt drive, I have to ask why? to me it has no advanatage over a chain except you dont oil it. they are useally only found on LOW HP cruser bikes, not high perf machines. but hey if thats what you like...
 

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Scottoiler

I just purchased a Scottoiler setup. Hasn't arrived yet. Anybody else using one of these for chain lube? I understand that they pretty much solve chain lube problems. They use a light oil that doesn't draw dirt the way most do, and the touring kit only needs to be refilled every 3-5000 miles. I know they multiply chain life dramatically.

web page is www.actionstation.com
 
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Re: Scottoiler

hyperlite said:
I just purchased a Scottoiler setup. Hasn't arrived yet. Anybody else using one of these for chain lube? I understand that they pretty much solve chain lube problems. They use a light oil that doesn't draw dirt the way most do, and the touring kit only needs to be refilled every 3-5000 miles. I know they multiply chain life dramatically.

web page is www.actionstation.com
I have a ScottOiler in my Wee-Strom and just love it (well... a bit of exaggeration... I love my wife but I like ScottOiler - better? :wink: )! Easy to install and almost fool-proof. V-Strom has even required vacuum nipple ready in engine where to connect the vacuum tube of SO unit (I used the rupper-capped nipple near the intake port of front cylinder). Once the adjustment has been done, the chain keeps slightly oiled 100% of the time. Been riding 10.000km, adjusted chains once so far (more normal mechanical paranoia than real need for adjustment, though...).


I also purchased LubeTube container to give even longer period between re-fills; summer tours can now be carried out w/o carrying oil bottles. The reservoir unit sits nicely behind left passenger peg support and LubeTube is located under the seat in "storage compartment".

There are also more sophisticated electronic chain oilers, but I can't really see any benefit with their speed sencors etc.; simple solutions for simple man!

http://www.scottoiler.com
 
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Discussion Starter #14
I'm just curious , Has anyone compared the LS650 Savage belt drive pullys to the Strom sprockets ?
 

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I sold my 99 BMW 1100GS because of a leaking transmission seal (hours to take apart to replace a $7 seal, did it myself due to huge cost of lagor) and then the final drive failed and left me stranded 700 miles from home.

Big bucks to replace the final drive - I was lucky and found a low mileage (4K miles) one and replaced it myself. Then I sold it and about 8K miles later it left the next owner stuck in Ohio about 900 miles from home.

I'm liking this chain thing.....
 

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A problem with drive belts not found on a chain is that the suspension travel needs to be very limited because a belt cannot run too loose or it will skip teeth, too tight and you will break something like a counter shaft seal to begin with.

A tensioner or idler pully would be required for a bike with the amount of suspension travel available on the V-strom to allow the swingarm move throughout it's complete arc or range of movement. And this isn't something to just cobble together, the movement and stress' involved are not that simple to just slap something together.

The LS 650 had suspension travel of half the stroms and easily 1/3rd the hp of the 1000 and 1/2th of the 650, a mildly tuned single is not in the same class as these bikes nor was the bikes driveline components designed for the suspension travel or the hp levels the stroms would put on it.

There are now belts available that can easily handle the hp from the 1000 but it comes down the ability to keep the proper tension and I don't think this possible without doing a similar idler as Buell uses on their bikes.
 
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