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Have you ever fell/gotten into an accident with your bike?

  • yes, however im a daredevil

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Discussion Starter #1
Lets be honest...i'm looking towards a bike, just for weekend cruising, mainly mostly towards times with the least amount of traffic on the road, however living in a city this makes me wonder if I really should.

How many of you guys have ever had an experience where due to another car or animal or pedestrian whatever you have fallen off your bike? And for those of you who had, please be honest, how often do you ride? And where do you live, city or somewhere more isolated?

And also, are you people daredevils of any sort? (riding to impress others, riding in between cars, riding during traffic hours to save time, etc)

I really really really want to ride, however lately all i'm reading about is people falling and bikes getting totaled. I know that driving has gotten really bad lately, however, has it come to this?
 

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Regardless of your riding style, there is always a risk on getting into an accident. As a first-time rider, I'm cautious but the confidence grows to being more bold every ride (am now playing around with lifting the front wheel and tighter, slow speed turns).

Arm yourself as much as possible (take the course), wear protective gear, and be alert and this will help minimize the risk.

For me, if I don't feel 100% (too tired, ailment, mood) or bad weather is nigh or on the way, I take the car.
 
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lajaro said:
Regardless of your riding style, there is always a risk on getting into an accident. As a first-time rider, I'm cautious but the confidence grows to being more bold every ride (am now playing around with lifting the front wheel and tighter, slow speed turns).

Arm yourself as much as possible (take the course), wear protective gear, and be alert and this will help minimize the risk.

For me, if I don't feel 100% (too tired, ailment, mood) or bad weather is nigh or on the way, I take the car.
I'm pretty much at the same level of mentality that you're at, i've taken the course, however planning to take it again, and i'm going to invest in a good amount of protective gear. I'm just trying to get some statistics as to how people are doing with bikes. Honestly, I wish that there were certain days and certain times where no cars could be allowed on the road (not saying that other motorists arent dangerous, but lets compare apples to apples, right?)
 

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In answer to your question a resounding Yes! I was taken down by a Racoon in '83. not the most pleasant feeling , was slowpoking on a back road in Vt, and it came streaking out of nowhere ( actually it was a cornfield) :oops:
I never had a chance to swerve or brake.I went down and tore up my gloves,jacket, pants & helmet. But I got up and after assesing that my front forks were folded back I decided towalk the rest of the 4 miles home. Due to pressure from the new Wife I had the bike fixed & sold it . I returned to motorcycling in 2000. I have logged over 40,000 miles since 2000 and I currently have 5700 miles on my '05 1k . I RIDE EVERYDAY & I RIDE SAFE,
It's currently in a Tropical Heat wave here in the North East. 97 degrees this afternoon :shock: , I donned the J.R Meteor jacket & My overpants today as I do everyday ATGATT:!: This is a rule I live By. :D
 

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I've gone down 3 times on the street and twice on the track. First time on the track was my fault (pushing waaaay too hard on cooked tires). Second time on the track was not, a guy had target fixation and went right into me.
My first accident on the street, a woman ran a stop sign and i was nailed (luckily in front of a motor cop!) and I was banged up but not too bad. Second time on the street i was filling my bike up at the pumps and a genius on his cellphone dropped his large SUV into reverse instead of drive and pinned my hand between his tail light and the brake lever so i was stuck, plus broke the fairings on my bike, which was then totalled. Third time i was making a right and the stereotypical geriatric driver with coke bottle glasses rear ended me because they couldn't see me.
I've been blessed, i've been ATGATT since day one and continue to do so. I wear an Olympia AST jacket in slime-lime hi viz yellow along with modulating lights and tons of reflective tape. I know I take my chances but at the end of the day, the freedom and neurosynaptic pleasure of riding are worth the inherent risk. Ride. Just Ride.
 

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Riding a moorcycle is always going to be a little risky. However, I think most experienced riders would agree that most accidents (probably >95 %) could have been avoided. This doesn't mean they were the rider's fault, but they could have been avoided had the rider been more aware of their surroundings. I live in a city and commute daily to work. I have been riding street bikes for 14 years and have never crashed, tipped over, or otherwise hurt myself or the bike. (I learned to ride on dirtbikes, so the newbie mistakes had been made off the road.) There have certainly been some close calls, but no actual accidents. I attribute this streak of good fortune to experience and following a few simple rules:

1. Never take your bike somewhere in traffic that a car couldn't go. CA riders will disagree, but if a cager doesn't expect a vehicle (car) to be somewhere, they definitely won't be looking for a motorcycle.

2. Always leave plenty of room in front of you to allow the car behind you to get stopped safely. Increased following distances are to keep you from getting rear ended, not just to save you from rear ending the car in front of you.

3. Never assume that a driver sees you, or acknowleges your right of way. Bottom line...bigger vehicle has the right of way. Until you see a car stop, or acknowledge you in some definitive way, don't pull in front of them.

4. Constantly evaluate your surroundings. Make sure you know where all the cars are around you, and even who is driving them. A lot of times you can look and see by the person's demeanor if they are likely to try some aggressive maneuver in front of you.

Other than that. Just have fun and enjoy the fresh air. Motorcycling is worth the risks associated with it!
 

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I reckon I fell off about 15 times between 71-73....on one occasion I fell off at the same roundabout twice in 30 seconds! On the way in, got back on, and then fell off again on the way out. :lol:
Another one was going headfirst through the window of an Indian restaurant and ending up spreadeagled across a dining table covered in curry! :lol:
On all those occasions it was my fault for being stupid, but on each occasion I got up and walked away with a few scratches.
So I wised up a lot.....the wake up call was when a very good friend got beheaded riding in front of me. That stays with you forever.

The next dismount was Feb 1978 when I had a tank slapper at 110 on a GT750 Suzuki. No warning, it just happened.....but there was a degree of cuplability on me because I knew it was a bit unstable, yet I still pushed it.
I got up and walked away with just scratches....and realised how lucky I'd been over the years.
My eldest son was only 6 weeks old at the time, and his life would have been very different if I hadn't been there for him.
So I really wised up and fully matured then.

Since Feb 1978.....nothing! Except offroad....but that doesn't count cos it's compulsory.

So yes, I have fallen off....a lot! But in a different time when I was a different person.
 

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I hit a patch of black ice and laid it down doing ~20 mph. I consider myself a very safe rider, but stuff happens sometimes!
 

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I took the conservative approach when returning to riding after many years away:

-Read "Proficient Motorcycling" and other riding books
-Bought 'Ride Like a Pro" DVD's
-Took the MSF course
-Bought a 650 instead of the 1000 that a buddy suggested
-Kept the ATGATT policy. Full face helmet, jacket (bright yellow), pants, boots, gloves. EVERY ride
-Practiced in my neighborhood, then
-Practiced riding secondary roads to a parking lot, where I
-Practiced the MSF and RLAP maneuvers (frequently)
-Practiced emergency stops from higher speeds on deserted roads, before I
-Practiced short rides on the slab
-Rode conservatively.

After all that, I encountered a left-turning cage, in the rain. Went down, totaled bike, damaged me (hopefully nothing permanent). No matter how you play it, things can happen. Ya pays yer money and ya takes yer chances. You can tilt the odds in your favor by wearing a helmet and not drinking, as well as other stuff (see above). Ultimately, we each have to decide whether it is worth the risk not only to ourselves, but to those who care about us and/or depend on us.

Tim
 

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A black cat came out of cornfield and took me down at 55 mph in '85. I high-sided without a helmet on
(I was stupid back then). For some reason I kept my chin tucked into my chest
as the back of my shoulders hit the pavement. My head never touched the ground.
The rest of my body suffered road rash, but no broken bones.

The scariest part was that I had "hard" contacts in that day, and when
I hit the ground I must have squeezed my eyes shut incredibly tight, causing
the contacts to slice into my corneas. It wasn't until I had been home
from the hospital for several hours that I lost my site. Scariest damn thing.
All I could see was white. I spend a week with patches over both eyes. I was very relieved when
I took them off and I could see again.

I was told that the damn cat eventually stood up and walked away.
 

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I've been down once. No other vehciles involved. I developed a slow leak in my rear tire from a 1/4 inch lag screw that hitched a ride without my knowledge. 15PSI won't hold in a tight turn. :cry:

I straightened the handle bar, zip-tied the brake lever back on and rode home. I've ridden every day since.

Your own fear is more likely to get you killed than somebody else. It leads to a lack of confidence in yourself and your abilities and will cause you to ride in a timid manner.
 

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Well, thats embarasing. Only one vote for "yes but I am a Dare Devil"...

Well atleast I dont act the fool any more. Went down once in Lafayette La that was not my fault, an F-350 was not paying attention and almost rearended me while I was waiting on a left turn, noticed them at the last moment , dumped the clutch and managed not to get hit turninginto the gas station but clipped the curb next to the driveway and layed it down on my leg (had been riding 3-4 weeks at this time).

2nd time was riding through a slow curve and an over filled grain truck had spilt some rice in the curve, hit that and my rear slid out from under me.

#3Was riding my GL1200 after a rain, had just left my works parkinglot and had forgotten to pick up my side stand.(safety switch had shorted out and had bypassed it). was following a festiva in the left lane of traffic, they slammed on their brakes, I swerved right but because of the side stand could not lean back hard enough and went off in the grass. I dont know how I kept it up but I figure I went through about 200' of wet grass and passed over 2 concreete driveways before coming to a stop. Any one who is familliar with Abbeville La, it was the post office lawn.

#4 was acting the fool in a parking lot on my RF900R, spun the rear tire trying to show off and enede up dropping it right there.

Well, that is the limit of my times being down/almost down. I would like to think I am pretty reformed of my hooligan ways now though.
 

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Never had an actual crash on the street yet. Lots of offs in the dirt years ago. Dropped the Wee twice so far in parking lots at zero speed, gotta stop doin that. I do wear all the gear and try to ride safe but I will be checking out a riders training course very shortly. I know I need some training and lots of practice to ride better, especially at lower speeds.
 

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October 2001 cut off by a cage and slid my azz down the pavement :evil: A week later I was clipped while making a left turn by the rider following me :roll: (he wasn't paying attention) May 28th 2002 nailed by a drunk driver as I stopped for a red light :evil: June 30th 2003 nailed a deer at 60mph and managed to keep it on two wheels. Last October I highsided my strom on a gravel covered corner on my way to run the Dragon.

Buy the gear & wear it :shock: If you haven't yet take an MSF course and if this is going to be your first bike, buy a 500gs or a 500 Ninja and learn to ride before moving to a Strom. I teach people how to ride and even the dept heads at my school will say the DL650 is NOT a starter bike :roll:
 

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In 36 years of motorcycling I have had 7 crashes on the road, and I couldn't hope to remember how many times I crashed while racing.

But to put things into perspective, when I was racing motocross 30 odd years ago, I would chose a corner and just ride it faster and faster each lap during practice until I crashed. That way I lnew my limit on that particular corner. If I went an entire race meeting without at least one crash in the heats or support eaces then I wasn't riding fast enough. I tried not to crash in championship races.

Of the seven crashes I had on the road, 3 were due to mechanical failure: One was a tye blew out at high speed, one was a rear hub split in half while I was riding at only moderate speed, and one was a sidestand spring failed and the side stand came down just as I was entering a left hand turn. Three of the other four crashes would have been preventable had I been more experienced at the time.

My last crash was in 1986, and my second to last crash was 1976.

Will I have any more? Probably, but not if I can help it. :oops:
 

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I'm a returning rider. I rode bikes many years ago and then quit as I grew up and discovered girls and cars. To answer your question, yes I went down a lot when I was young and I have the scars to prove it. I've slid bikes across gravel, pavement, dirt, you name it. In virtually every instance the fault was mine and mine alone. Most of them could have been prevented but I was young and immortal.

Early this year I decided I wanted another one, and I've loved every minute since. This time around I'm a good bit older, a good bit wiser, and a lot more cautious. This is what I've picked up on:

First adage: Nothing in life is risk free. Every time we get into (or onto) a motor vehicle of any sort we are taking a risk. It doesn't matter what kind of vehicle, and every day people pay the price for that risk. Pick up a newspaper in any city and there will be something about a wreck somewhere. People on motorcycles are more prone to injury because we don't have a steel cage around us. When someone hits us (or we hit someone) it hurts.

Second adage: There are two kinds of riders; those who have gone down and those who will. When riding a bike of any kind it is inevitable that sooner or later it is going to fall and you will be on it when that happens. Fact of life. This does not mean that a person is automatically going to get seriously hurt when that happens, many times the hurt is only to a person's pride. I've been bruised and scraped many times when was younger but so far this time around I've manage to keep all my skin in place.

Bottom line: There is risk in everything and if you ride a motorcycle the risk is a bit higher. You have to decide what the acceptable level of risk for you is. Nobody can decide that for you, only you can. It is a decision everyone of us makes, not only initially when we decide to get a motorcycle, but every time we get on it. For me the level of risk is tolerable.

You can choose to minimize the risk in several ways though. It's all been said in the posts above, but here it is again:

Take an approved motorcycle safety course. This cannot be over-emphasized. It is the single smartest thing you could possibly do before getting on a bike. I refused to get my bike out of the basement until I had been through one.

Wear the gear. Helmets may be required but in most places that is all. Get some protective gear, and wear it every time. Jacket, pants, boots. It does no good hanging in your closet, only if it's wrapped around you. I know it's hot there, it's hot here to. I still won't get my bike out of the basement without a lot of padding. If you choose to wear shorts and a t-shirt, that's a conscious choice on your part but I won't ride that way.

Don't ride if you don't feel like it. In most cases there is nobody forcing you to get on a bike. If you don't feel good, if you aren't alert, if you have a lot on your mind, then leave it parked. You need to be alert when riding and able to focus on what is going on.

Pick when and where you ride. Avoid traffic for the first few days. When you first get a bike you need to learn how to ride it before you get out in traffic. Don't just jump out in the middle of the freeway, learn to control the bike first. Large parking lots are great places to practice the basics so make use of them.

Keep your eyes moving and your head in gear. Know what is going on around you, watch intersections and driveways. Anticipate what is going on and leave plenty of reaction room between you and the vehicle ahead. As long as at least one of you sees the other in time most accidents can be avoided. I nearly had an accident a couple of weeks ago because I forgot this rule.

Know your limitations. Just because your riding buddies can carve a curve at 75 mph doesn't mean you can. The single most common cause of single-motorcycle accidents is riders running out of room in a curve because they over cooked things going in. Take your time and learn as you go. If it takes years to become proficient then so be it, just enjoy the ride.

These may not keep you from getting hurt, but they will help to sway the odds in your favor.
 

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I've got to wonder how many miles those who report never having gone down are doing. Out of all the instructors at the MSF course facilities I have taught at, only one had never been down. His miles were a lot lower than the rest of us. There are just too many invisible diesel oil slicks on the roads to avoid when turning and braking for one thing.
 

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I don't know how many miles I've ridden in my life. I've been riding for 21 years. There was a 5 year stretch in there where I didn't even own a car. The last few years have been fewer miles, (maybe 6k a year) because I travel a lot on business.

Stay alert, don't start daydreaming or thinking about other things.
 

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We (MSF Intructors) don't talk about whether we've crashed or not, so I don't know how many have or haven't.

There is one of the other instructors that I work with at my "real" job too. He has been riding for almost 40 years and during the last 4 years that I've known him, he has been riding 20k miles a year.

Motorcycling is higher risk than some activities, but we don't believe that crashing is inevitable.
 
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