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Discussion Starter #1
Hi I've got a 2015 vstrom earlier this year i had issues with the battery going flat. It was charging ok so i put it down to the battery. I've got oxford heated grips which at the time were wired directly to the battery. I bought a new lithium battery and all was good until one morning totally dead battery nothing at all in no dash lights at all. I put it down to leaving the grips on and the auto shut off not working. So i bought the wiring kit to wire the grios so they go off with the ignition. Come to it today and its totally dead again. I have no other accessories on the bike. Any ideas guys. I put my trickle charger on it and it won't charge comes up with battery faulty warning. I'm going to jump it in the morning and make sure it's charging my bike still needs the stator recall doing could that be a cause of this issue. Seems it's happened every couple months for last 4 months.
 

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When turning off the bike, could you have accidentally put the key to the parking light position and the lights drained the battery? Happened to me before..
 

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If you totally drain a Lithium battery they are done! Systems designed for them have voltage sensors that cut off current to prevent that. Sounds like that is what happened to yours?

When you say "charging ok", what voltage was it showing. I assume you have a meter on it, there is no other way to know if it is charging ok or not.....

I suspect you are going to find a faulty stator.
 

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I've had two stators go bad. One failure, the first, was of an intermittent nature ..... till it wasn't. So yes, it could very well be the stator.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yes i had a meter on it to check it was charging ok too. I had been thinking i might have put the parking lights on as i put the steering lock on in the garage. Going to jump start it in the morning and see if its charging and if it is go and get the battery tested..
 

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What were the voltages on the meter?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The volt meter was reading 13.4 from memory. I'll check it once i get hime and jump start it. It was a couple of months ago when i last had the meter on it.
 

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A dead battery will NOT get fully charged by a trickle charger, and might not even charge at all!
A trickle charger, battery maintainer, is just that. To keep a battery at the fully charged state.
It doesn't have enough charging power to revive a dead battery.

Also the charging system on the bike doesn't like to have to charge up a fully dead battery.
Its hard on the components. That's why a new battery always states to charge the battery before installing it.

Please only jump your bike with a bike battery. Not a car battery.
OR just push start it !
 

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Discussion Starter #10
The tricle charger i have is a battery charger and a tricle charger so u can use it for either. But it wont charge the battery is comes up with a warning saying battery failure.
 

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Jump starting on a fully dead battery is risky.

I had a LI battery die in my MT09 and the bike could not be ridden, relays were slamming in & out the risk of a spike to the computer was far to high.

Your battery is like a sponge and can absorb power spikes, if the battery is stuffed it can not absorb any spikes.

If I was in your position I would pull the LI battery from the bike because charging them can be dangerous I would then use jumper leads to a good battery and put the good battery and the LI battery on charge at the same time, by having both batteries inline your charger should see no fault and start to charge.

Charging a LI battery from dead flat is a risky thing to do so have them in a safe place and do not turn your back on it
 

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Do these Li bike batteries, which I assume must be at least 3S (3 packs in series, don't know about parallel), have balancing circuitry built in?

I know that hobbyist Li-ion packs for RC planes and such have connectors with taps for the packs inside, and use chargers which balance the individual packs.

I've always been a bit dubious about using these in a bike, as the bikes' charging systems weren't meant for Li batteries
 

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I would pull the Lithium battery and charge the old battery if you still have it as it seems that the battery was not the issue at all.
Suzuki provides a plug specifically for heated grips. It is at top of the radiator/beneath the airbox. I recommend that you remove your accessory wiring kit and plug the grips into the OEM designed source.

I would be looking for any other possible drain for your power loss before accepting that it must be the stator. Do you have any other accessories besides the grips?
I'm assuming that on each occasion the battery is drained, it is drained overnight and not when you have just stopped for an hour or two. Fitting a volt meter would be a good idea.
 

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I'm not 100% sure with a LI battery I have never tested the voltage on a stuffed LI battery.

Normally a drain is the only way to get a battery to zero, even a stuffed battery will hold charge, usually around 10.8v.


If it were your stator the bike would have stopped running long before zero so I would suspect a drain on your battery when the motor is not running.
 

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If the charger is saying a faulty battery, there is a very high chance it is bad. They can detect a shorted or open cell.
 

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I've got a couple DC power supplies that I've used to overcome the internal resistance of a battery when it's gone flat.
Some batteries can come back to life, some can't.
It's good to have a 0-120 volt 50 amp power supply laying around. Those are self regulating too so when the voltage goes up the amps go down.
Bleeb me, I've left enough aux lights or heated grips to cause a battery grief.
One thing that's nice to have around is one of those mini battery jumper devices. But if your battery has gone flat, they won't work well.
You can disconnect the battery and use the jumper pack to start the bike to insure it's a bad battery that you are t shooting. Don't rely on the jumper pack to keep a bike running. They don't like that and can fail.
 

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The simple fact is that when a battery fails, it may not accept a charge, hold a charge, or provide enough current to operate the load in question. Many times Ive had people tell me.."The battery should be good, I charged it all night."
It doesnt quite work that way.
Also, attempting to shove more current through a defective battery via a higher capacity charger is an invitation to disaster. I've witnessed a 70A Associated battery charger hooked up to a Honda CB1000 Custom our used car department took in on trade. I ran over to the bike, the scene looked like Hiroshima what with the smoke--acid running down the side of the bike, swing arm, exhaust, etc.
And the line in one of the posts..hooking up motorcycle batteries in series makes no sense to me whatsoever.
The not-so-hidden gem here is in Notacop's posts above: "You can disconnect the battery and use the jumper pack to start the bike to insure it's a bad battery that you arent shooting." Very true! Many dont disconnect the bike's battery when jumping only to have the charging or jumping current circle back because the battery being charged or jumped is internally shorted.
It all starts--literally!-- with the battery. If it's bad, as in shorted, dead cell, sulfated, no charger on the planet is going to make it right.
But there are a couple of simple tests with common inexpensive equipment to help you determine the state of the battery: a 2A/6A charger, and a voltmeter.
Normally you would charge a battery at 1/10 the amp-hour rating of the battery for 10 hours, as in using a Battery Tender. No heat build-up to worry about.
Example, a 10 A-hr battery safely charges at 1A. Doubling the charging rate to 2A cuts the charging time to 5 hours, but you have to periodically feel the battery for overheating. Near the end of charging, apply voltmeter clips to the charging cable still attached to the battery--if your reading is 15.5 or higher, the battery is defective. 13.5-14.5 is the recommended charging rate of your bike's charging system. If the reading is below 13.5, the battery wont build up the charge while the vehicle is in operation, and with injection and lighting loads, could run out on a ride. Might be OK until you shut it off. Then slow or no crank.
Another test is to charge the battery as you normally would. Then, disable the injection(pull a fuse or relay) and monitor cranking voltage. If you show 10VDC or less, then the battery has poor capacity. 9.6VDC or less for a carbureted engine.
With a simple 12V test lamp, socket and cheap 194 bulb(car side marker, etc) you can judge dark current draw and battery drain.
With your voltmeter you can test stator windings, R/R operation, and voltage drops in both power and ground circuits.

Not hard to do, not time-consuming.
 
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