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One guy (Versys rider) rode away in an ambulance but he was not badly hurt. His knee got busted up a little and he had some minor road rash, but overall he wasn't bad. The other guy was saved by his gear, basically not a scratch on him, but one of his hands felt sore after the accident. Back roads, a few curves, one guy hit one corner a little faster than he was comfortable with, locked up his rear brake and lost it on his black Yamaha. R6 or FZ6...something like that. The other guy was behind him on a Versys that I'm pretty sure had less than 1000 miles on it. He lost control while trying to avoid running into the first guy who lost control. Both bikes totaled. Total of 5 bikes on the group ride, some guys I work with. We had a discussion before we began riding about not riding too fast and how everyone would wait at each stop sign or traffic signal in case the group didn't stay close together. We were in a 55 mph zone and the guys who crashed were probably doing around 60 mph when it happened. Not crazy speeds that I'm talking about here. This was a good reminder to me of why I hardly ever do group rides. The Yamaha had about 4,500 miles on it and was a 2011 and the Versys was new with (I'm pretty sure) less than 1,000 miles on it. Could have been worse. Nobody seriously hurt. Pic of some of the carnage: (the flat-bed truck driver just used his winch to drag both bikes onto the truck laying down on their "bad side" because they were so badly damaged we couldn't roll them). :thumbdown:
 

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Geez, what a mess! Reminder it can happen at any time. Glad nobody was seriously hurt.
 

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It takes a lot of experience to use that rear brake properly, it can get you hurt quick. I saw a squid on a R6 at the gap a couple of years ago freak out in a curve and lock the rear up smacking the side of a guys truck. Then the hammerhead on the R6 had the nerve to fight the claim. He locked his rear brake up and crossed the yellow line. 3 of us saw it. Sad thing is all he had to do was let off the throttle and lean.
 

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A stark reminder for all of us to slow down around curves, leave plenty of space between riders and A.T.G.A.T.T.:yesnod:
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Failure to practice braking and countersteering procedures until they become reflex actions are the two biggest reasons bikes get dropped in solo crashes. Locking up a rear brake and going wide in curves are the usual results. The latter is often accompanied by looking where the rider is afraid he/she is going to go instead of the desired line.

Learn from the mistakes of others. It hurts less. Practice, practice, practice. Group rides all too often lead to such results too. If this was a typical case, there was probably plenty of room to slow down and plenty of lean angle remaining but the riders were unable to make the proper corrections.

Thankfully, there were no serious injuries. Such inability to negotiate a curve often includes an oncoming vehicle in the mess.
 

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That is a shame to see new bikes totaled like that. Such a waste. Hopefully their insurance covers it.
 

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Godspeed, brothers. Although the details are different, been there, done that. Heal, and get back on that horse.


Escape the cage!
 

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My riding buddy got taken out by a boulder on Mother's day. Broken hand bones and ruined his riding suit and killed his 675 Triumph.
Yah, just never know when!
At least these fellers were minimally damaged but it all hurts!
 

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Failure to practice braking and countersteering procedures until they become reflex actions are the two biggest reasons bikes get dropped in solo crashes. Locking up a rear brake and going wide in curves are the usual results. The latter is often accompanied by looking where the rider is afraid he/she is going to go instead of the desired line.

Learn from the mistakes of others. It hurts less. Practice, practice, practice. Group rides all too often lead to such results too. If this was a typical case, there was probably plenty of room to slow down and plenty of lean angle remaining but the riders were unable to make the proper corrections.

Thankfully, there were no serious injuries. Such inability to negotiate a curve often includes an oncoming vehicle in the mess.
Right. In my experience it is much easier to go down because of too much lean than to completely blow the curve.
 

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Chopping the throttle in a curve makes the bike drop into the curve so it'll turn sharper, but also puts the hard parts closer to the pavement with more chance of scraping, and takes weight off the rear wheel with more chance of a rear wheel skid if too much rear brake is used. Smoothly adding a bit of gas stabilizes the bike on its suspension, makes both ends rise, and straightens the line. The feeling of excessive speed will be easier to handle with the more stable bike. The panic of the feeling of excessive speed is more difficult to handle.

When entering a curve faster than one would have liked takes discipline to ride it out. Keep looking through the curve to the exit. If it's not too late, enter wide toward the outside of the curve--toward the left of the lane for a right curve, etc. Lean into the curve, lean toward the pavement, more than ever. Don't, do not, never ever stomp on the brake pedal. Smooth braking, more front than rear always, as needed. Countersteer, and countersteer harder to tighten the turn. Keep looking through the curve to the exit. If a boot or peg scrapes, do not panic. Do not do anything abruptly. A bit of throttle here will help the bike stand up, or maybe smoothly lean the shoulders more toward the pavement (but should have been leaning there at the start) while keeping the eyes level. After the tightest point of the curve, smoothly roll on some throttle to stabilize the bike and help it straighten and start standing up, and lightly pull back on the bars with the inside hand to straighten. I'm not a big believer in the concept of target fixation as the cause of many wrecks. I think that more often the rider just doesn't know how to corner, blows the corner, then is looking at what he's going to hit. Turning the head, while keeping the eyes level, to look through the curve to the exit is a big, big part of properly turning. A rider that doesn't look through the turn probably doesn't know any of the other essentials of proper turning, though--enter wide, body weight to the inside, brake smoothly, countersteer, pick the best exit line, roll on some throttle when exiting, set up for the next turn.

The second bike rider was just dumb for following that close. The first rider was simply incompetent. There are good training courses, good books, good videos on how to ride competently and safely. OJT (On the Job Training--make that OBT) is a poor way to learn.
 

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Chopping the throttle has the same effect of braking when traveling above 6-10 mph: it will stand the bike up and widen the turn.

Too much throttle will lean the bike more into the turn; the opposite (i.e., stand the bike) occurs at speeds below 10 mph, which is why gassing it allows one to drive out of a slow-speed fall/turn.

When the feelers scrape, one should condition one’s self to do the opposite of what may be instinctive. Instead of leaning one’s body away from the ground, which actually increases the lean of the bike further, one should shift the body weight toward the turn which will cause the bike to lift off away from the ground. This is why sport riders hang off of the bike as it allows them to take a turn at a higher rate of speed because the bike is more upright and has more traction to handle the high-speed turn/curve.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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I'd bet the Versys pilot got a bit o' 'target fixation' when the yammie went down.....I've seen it happen in racing situations where the first guy who falls causes the gawker behind him to fall down for no apparent reason, where if under different circumstances were in play, the follower would have made the corner if riding solo. It's a weird phenomenon.

It's so easy to get sucked into that speed-rachet that occurs when a bunch of guys ride together on bikes. Everyone says they'll take it easy, but the first guy into the first set of twisties always goes in a little hotter than normal......Echoes of why I really enjoy solo adventures best of all.
 

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This was a good reminder to me of why I hardly ever do group rides.
Will "hardly ever" become "don't"?

I'm almost there myself.

Glad your buddies weren't any worse off than they are.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Will "hardly ever" become "don't"?

I'm almost there myself.

Glad your buddies weren't any worse off than they are.
Thanks. I'm close to it. I have a friend I ride with pretty regularly. We ride on about the same level and know each other's riding styles well enough to do ok. Like Ponch and John from CHiPS back in the day. :biggrinjester: But being serious... The guy who lost it first said he put about 4,500 miles on his bike in 2.5 years before he totalled it Sunday. He just doesn't ride much. He screwed up and he knows it and has already said it, etc. There was a second guy behind him (riding a Ducati Multistrada) who was able to dodge him after he wrecked. The guy on the Versys was behind that second guy and HE (the third/Versys guy) was the one who decided it was better to go really wide (ride off the outside of the turn onto the grass and dump his bike) than to try to ride around the guy who wrecked. I don't know the Versys rider guy well but he mentioned he's been riding 20 years and never had anything like that happen to him before. Just repeating what he said. I have no idea if he has ridden 100 miles each year the last 20 years or 20K miles a year for the last 20 years. I mention some of this partially because someone commented that the Versys rider was likely following too closely. Maybe he was, I'm not sure because I didn't witness it happen. But there was another rider between him and the guy who wrecked initially who was able to get out without a scratch so... draw your own conclusions. Again, the fact that they both walked away with just bumps and scrapes makes it all so much easier to talk about and is what's really important. Live to ride another day. Or... maybe get a different hobby. :fineprint:
 

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I did my second and last group ride last weekend, it was to raise money for a charity, so I decided to go. I dropped out 1/3 of the way through the ride. New rode, unfamiliar riders, and too much speed,at least for my taste. I'm not a B-17 pilot and have no desire for formation riding.
 

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Sorry to hear this. Glad no serious injury.

The bikes were low mileage. How about the riders? Experienced or no?
 

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This was a good reminder to me of why I hardly ever do group rides.
Quite so. There are enough objective dangers on the road without adding the antics or inexperience of another rider or riders in front/beside/behind you.
 

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I mention some of this partially because someone commented that the Versys rider was likely following too closely. Maybe he was, I'm not sure because I didn't witness it happen.
The outcome demonstrates clearly that he was following too closely, right? Glad nobody was seriously injured.

As GW points out, this is an opportunity to learn from someone else's mistake. Following distance should be such that if the vehicle in front of you does a hard stop (or goes down), you can readily stop before catching up with him as he brakes, slides or tumbles ahead of you. You need enough gap to react and stop or avoid him, assuming you can brake as quickly as the guy in front. This is true whatever you're driving or riding and whether you're following a car, truck, bike or whatever. Hopefully the vehicle behind you does the same.

Formation riding is dangerous. If you do it, you'd better be willing to trust the guys around of you with your life because that's the decision you're making. Personally I don't care for the risk/benefit ratio.
 
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