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I bought a 2004 V-Strom a couple weeks ago, put on new tires, changed oil etc. I'm not sure if this is normal or if I did something wrong, but when I'm riding, and I shake the back wheel at like, 30mph, it feels almost like the back tire is sliding around a little bit. Also it does it on the highway when I ride over a long groove in the road. I'm not sure if this is normal and I'm just over thinking it, or something else is wrong. I think my back breaks are slightly rubbing aswell. Another situation that happened was I was riding and slammed on my breaks, and it almost felt like the back wheel was sliding around a bit. At first I thought I locked up the breaks, but I don't think I did. Any ideas?
 

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Some things to check:
- Tire pressure
- Rear wheel alignment
- All wheel spacers accounted for and in the correct positions
- Wheel and sprocket carrier bearings in good condition
- Chain tensioned properly
- Axle nut torque - should be 55-60 ft-lb with anti-seize
- Brake disk and pads in good condition
- Caliper cleaned and wear areas greased (with actual brake grease)
 

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I bought a 2004 V-Strom a couple weeks ago, put on new tires, changed oil etc. I'm not sure if this is normal or if I did something wrong, but when I'm riding, and I shake the back wheel at like, 30mph, it feels almost like the back tire is sliding around a little bit. Also it does it on the highway when I ride over a long groove in the road. I'm not sure if this is normal and I'm just over thinking it, or something else is wrong. I think my back breaks are slightly rubbing aswell. Another situation that happened was I was riding and slammed on my breaks, and it almost felt like the back wheel was sliding around a bit. At first I thought I locked up the breaks, but I don't think I did. Any ideas?
It wouldn't hurt if you just go ahead and remove and reinstall the rear wheel. If this is new to you, maybe find a steady hand for on scene advice. Also you can find parts diagrams online, like at bikebandit.com, to help verify that all the spacers are in the right place or even there at all. Even if you are an old hand, it happens (so I'm told:wink2:)

Like I said, it never hurts to trust your instincts. But it can if you don't.
 

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be careful, new tires are slippery!!
Interesting? Tire manufacturers have not used "release agent" on tire molds in decades. Wonder what makes them "slippery" now?

Tuesday I mounted up a new Anakee 3 on the rear of my R1200GS at 16,789 miles. I went to the store yesterday and by the time I got home I had put 11 miles on the new tire and there was only about 1/8" of chicken strip left on both side of the thread and I'm still around to tell the story:surprise:
 

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Kneel beside the rear wheel, grab the top of the tire with one hand, and using the other hand to steady the bike shake the wheel/tyre back and forth to see if there is any movement. Then check the line on the tire (both sides) to ensure that the tire is correctly mounted on the rim. Check the air (38psi cold is a good starting point). Reassure yourself that you reassembled the wheel correctly.
Brakes do touch slightly most of the time. If you believe that yours might be binding grab the brake disc after a ride. If it is burning hot it is binding.
 

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I have also heard that it is possible to reinstall one of the wheel spacers (#8 ??) the wrong way.
Also, if the Rear Sprocket Drum falls out of the rear wheel of its own accord the Rear Hub rubber buffers (#6 x5) should be replaced. An often used budget fix is to cut rubber bands from an old tube to make those buffers a tight fit in the hub.
 

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Interesting? Tire manufacturers have not used "release agent" on tire molds in decades. Wonder what makes them "slippery" now?

Tuesday I mounted up a new Anakee 3 on the rear of my R1200GS at 16,789 miles. I went to the store yesterday and by the time I got home I had put 11 miles on the new tire and there was only about 1/8" of chicken strip left on both side of the thread and I'm still around to tell the story:surprise:
I worked at a Michelin/BFG truck tire plant. The molds are most definitely sprayed with a release agent. Maybe they stopped the practice for cycle tires? But I'm doubting it, and spreading misinformation could easily get someone hurt/killed.

EDIT:
From tire home sites:

metzler: For optimum performance, new tires should be ridden on cautiously for the first 60-120 miles. During this run-in period sudden acceleration, heavy braking, and hard cornering must be avoided.

shinko: Shinko recommends a run-in distance of approximately 100 miles. Before then, maximum power or hard cornering should not be applied to the tires. Proper run-in allows you to familiarize yourself with the feel of the new tires or tire combination, as well as allowing the tire mold release agent applied during the manufacturing process to be worn off.

Dunlop: When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been achieved.

Avon: When new motorcycle tyres are fitted for the road, they should not be subjected to maximum power until a reasonable ‘running in’ distance has been covered. 100 dry miles (160km) is the recommended minimum (discount any wet miles covered).
 

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I worked at a Michelin/BFG truck tire plant. The molds are most definitely sprayed with a release agent. Maybe they stopped the practice for cycle tires? But I'm doubting it, and spreading misinformation could easily get someone hurt/killed.

EDIT:
From tire home sites:

metzler: For optimum performance, new tires should be ridden on cautiously for the first 60-120 miles. During this run-in period sudden acceleration, heavy braking, and hard cornering must be avoided.

shinko: Shinko recommends a run-in distance of approximately 100 miles. Before then, maximum power or hard cornering should not be applied to the tires. Proper run-in allows you to familiarize yourself with the feel of the new tires or tire combination, as well as allowing the tire mold release agent applied during the manufacturing process to be worn off.

Dunlop: When new tires are fitted, they should not be subjected to maximum power or hard cornering until a reasonable run-in distance of approximately 100 miles has been achieved.

Avon: When new motorcycle tyres are fitted for the road, they should not be subjected to maximum power until a reasonable ‘running in’ distance has been covered. 100 dry miles (160km) is the recommended minimum (discount any wet miles covered).

How is it I took brand-new tires and was above to lean them over almost the entries way without incident. The "run in" period talk is lawyer driven. If they posted it was okay to hit the track from mile one the first person who low sided would be suing.

I personally believe the "run in " verbiage is there 1st to protect the manufacturer and second to allow the rider to get used to the new tires and their profile. Going from old worn out flat spotted tires to new fresh and rounded tires the steer in is a lot more pronounced and this gives people a period of time to get used to the new "feel".


Also the comment about the tire should not see full power until broken in. What if you take 2 bikes with the same size wheels. One produces 120 HP the other 60HP. At 1/2 power on the 120 HP bike I am at full power of the 60HP bike. How does the tire know the difference?
 

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How is it I took brand-new tires and was above to lean them over almost the entries way without incident. The "run in" period talk is lawyer driven. If they posted it was okay to hit the track from mile one the first person who low sided would be suing.

I personally believe the "run in " verbiage is there 1st to protect the manufacturer and second to allow the rider to get used to the new tires and their profile. Going from old worn out flat spotted tires to new fresh and rounded tires the steer in is a lot more pronounced and this gives people a period of time to get used to the new "feel".
Recently there was a tire expert on Adventure Rider Radio. He stated that release agents are no longer used & the "different" feel of new tires is due to just whet you stated. Being used to old, flat centered, worn old tires now suddenly you have proper shaped tires & things feel weird.
 

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How is it I took brand-new tires and was above to lean them over almost the entries way without incident.
1/8" chicken strips, after 11 miles? Was that after you walked on water and parted the Red Sea? :grin2: You can believe as you wish, but don't endanger others with your BS bravado.
 

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I'll defer to @DonOhio45813, but I believe that new "sticker" tires will continue vulcanize or cure once installed. This process hardens the tire over the first miles. It's even more noticeable on new semi tires, where the tread starts out at an inch or more depth and multiple plies in many cases means there is a lot of curing going on in the tread, sidewall and between the plies. The handling can be pretty exciting barreling into a cloverleaf, arguing with a loaded trailer that wants us to go straight, not around the turn.
Maybe it is or is not release agent, but there is something on the surface that is shiny and rubs off on your hands, and it ain't tire dressing.
 

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Maybe it is or is not release agent, but there is something on the surface that is shiny and rubs off on your hands, and it ain't tire dressing.
I'll take a guess that it is a preservative for shelf appeal and shelf life.
That aside, I hope we hear from the thread starter if and when there is conclusion.
 

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1/8" chicken strips, after 11 miles? Was that after you walked on water and parted the Red Sea? :grin2: You can believe as you wish, but don't endanger others with your BS bravado.
I rode the motorcycle like I typically ride it or any other and made turns as I always do. I'm not endangering or threatening anyone's wellbeing by doing so or by what I am typing.

You are implying that to get the tire to within a 1/8th inch of the edge of the thread I must have been riding recklessly, dragging a knee and pushing the bike to the extreme limits of what a tire can handle. The reality is or anyone with proper technique can use the entire thread pattern of a tire in a parking lot at speeds of just a few MPH.
 

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I rode the motorcycle like I typically ride it or any other and made turns as I always do. I'm not endangering or threatening anyone's wellbeing by doing so or by what I am typing.

You are implying that to get the tire to within a 1/8th inch of the edge of the thread I must have been riding recklessly, dragging a knee and pushing the bike to the extreme limits of what a tire can handle. The reality is or anyone with proper technique can use the entire thread pattern of a tire in a parking lot at speeds of just a few MPH.
I'm not concerned with how you ride. But on a forum that often has a few new'ish riders, implying that new tires are NOT slippery, and manufacturer disclaimers can be ignored, is totally irresponsible and dangerous, for other riders. I was not implying YOUR riding was dangerous to others....it's your life, do as you please. You brought up the mold release agent, I simply refuted it from personal experience in a Michelin facility, and manufacturer disclaimers. I personally believe new tires need scuffed in, for whatever reason.
 

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You were the one who stated new tires are slippery. I stated "release agents" have not been used in decades and then asked that since they (release agents) were no longer commonplace what would be causing modern motorcycle tires to be slippery now?

I understand you worked for Michelin making truck tires but I am not certain how that refutes anything as it applies to the manufacturer of motorcycle tires.
 

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We've hijacked the OP's thread long enough. I stand by the disclaimer currently on a tire manufacturers website: "Proper run-in allows you to familiarize yourself with the feel of the new tires or tire combination, as well as allowing the tire mold release agent applied during the manufacturing process to be worn off."
 

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Ahem,

To the OP: Is the tire mounted the right way around?

A tire rotating in the wrong direction could result in what you are describing. Make sure the arrow is pointing the right way.

My father-in-law once had the local Yamaha shop install new tires on his Yamaha only to discover after a few kilometers of unsettled riding that the front tire was installed backwards.

Back to the shop, remount the tire, all felt fine.

Other than that, a flat rear is the only other reason I can think of for a squirrely feeling unless something is installed incorrectly.
 

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I bought a 2004 V-Strom a couple weeks ago, put on new tires, changed oil etc. I'm not sure if this is normal or if I did something wrong, but when I'm riding, and I shake the back wheel at like, 30mph, it feels almost like the back tire is sliding around a little bit. Also it does it on the highway when I ride over a long groove in the road. I'm not sure if this is normal and I'm just over thinking it, or something else is wrong. I think my back breaks are slightly rubbing aswell. Another situation that happened was I was riding and slammed on my breaks, and it almost felt like the back wheel was sliding around a bit. At first I thought I locked up the breaks, but I don't think I did. Any ideas?
My ride is the Vee2, so any or all of this may be completely irrelevant for you...

When I mounted up my first new set of tires, I was very disappointed at how much they tramlined. Maybe not to the extend of what you experienced, but it was enough to cause me to re-inspect the installation of both tires and wheels several times on multiple occasions. I was going from the stock Battlewings to the Continental TKC70's. Quite literally it felt to me like the Battlewings were more stable in 40mph crosswinds than the TKC70's were with no wind.

The only thing that improved the feel of the new tires was a careful re-alignment of the rear tire (previously aligned by the dealership). That cut down the tramlining quite a bit (maybe about half) but did not bring them even close to being as good as the Battlewings. Swapping out the front tire after the Conti was worn out (6,0000 miles) for a Shinko 705 helped quite a bit more. In the end I believe that the rear tire misalignment and the actual tread pattern differences between the two tires were both partially responsible for the squirrelly feel.

However, I would not blow off the chance of an installation problem without thoroughly inspecting and perhaps re-installing. I recall some discussion about a spacer issue with the rear wheel on the first gen's (not sure if 650 or 1000 or both), but don't have the details off the top of my head. Try searching the forum, or check out AdventureTech.biz since he offers a complete solution for the spacer issue.
 

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i watched a guy roll out of a BMW dealer and at the stop sign used too much throttle with his brand new tires and have the bike go right out from under him.
I'm usually more cautious. If I don't wash the tires after mounting them back on the bike i take it easy scrubbing them in going up the mountain and home again.
Although...I was impressed with the 805 Shinko's handling on the initial ride up the mountain. The big cogs really felt good laid over in the corners right off.
Rather than comment on another's perception of how tires work I'd suggest ride your own ride. Be happy, don't judge.
 
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