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Discussion Starter #1
I got my we to explore the back roads of Oregon, boy was I in for a suprise. The roads in Oregon are made with crushed rocks, about 2" deep. A stock bike is not rideable on this type of surface. Any suggestions out there? Otherwise I might have a perfect 09 for sale. Help.
 

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Loaded question. Tell us more or else you're going to get a wild variety of answers.

How experienced are you on this type of road with other motorcycles?
What makes the stock bike unrideable in your opinion?
If you have an 09, why are you posting in the 2012+ section?

Help us help you ;)
 

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According to many who ride offroad (I never have, but I read and search like wild when I buy a new bike), off-roading you should lower your air pressure in your tires. I've seen 20 front and 25 rear recommended by a few. Have you tried that? I used to mountain bike and the low air pressure does help a WHOLE lot with any loose surfaces.

Alexi
 

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The wee is a perfectly capable bike for all but the nastiest roads or deep ruts. Real deep gravel or loose rock is sometimes a struggle, I have not found those types of roads very frequently. What part of Oregon were you riding? I have done a lot back/off road riding in Eastern Oregon, and I think the wee handles is great.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I tried to ride the roads around the Ice Cave to China Hat then tried to get over to Hwy 31. Everything is fine untill the serface gets a little soft, then oh crap! It's not like I don't know how to ride in the dirt, I used to be a pretty good MX racer. Yea, like TwoShots said the KTM would have been nice, but they are a little more than the seven grand I paid for the We.
 

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If I may cut to the chase-

-Lose the Suzuki.
-Get on a KTM 690 Enduro R.
-Enjoy.
:thumbdown:

Yeah, and if you're going to ride the twisties, lose the strom & get an r1.
and
If your going you're ride the super slab, lose the Strom & get a gold wing.
and
If your going you're ride on urban commutes, lose the Strom & get a SM.
and
If your going you're ride [insert terrain type here], lose the Strom.

I find this to be this is a kind of a silly answer. People buy stroms not because they are the best at one thing, but because you can get them to handle a lot of different things.


I got my we to explore the back roads of Oregon, boy was I in for a suprise. The roads in Oregon are made with crushed rocks, about 2" deep. A stock bike is not rideable on this type of surface. Any suggestions out there? Otherwise I might have a perfect 09 for sale. Help.
Deep gravel on a heavy bike can (as can any bike) be very disconcerting. Keep your weight back, speed down, stay loose on the bars and let the front just swim in the general direction that you want to go. Obviously, if you can find harder ground in the channels between the deepest gravel ride there.

The strom can handle deep gravel OKish, it won't be like a KTM 450 exc, but it can be made to do OK. More aggressive tire will help a fair bit, as will a fork brace and a steering stabilizer. If you only want to do deep gravel consider a DR 650 a dr-z 400 (or many other true enduros), both are cheaper than your strom.

If you want a decent paved road carver, that is decently comfortable for super slab, that is a good commuter, that is good on gravel roads, that can handle deep gravel & the occasion 4wd road, stick with the strom.
 

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Deep gravel on a heavy bike can (as can any bike) be very disconcerting.
Thanks, Dr. Phil. I'm pretty sure the OP discovered that. Or more to point: He discovered 2 inches of crushed rock.

The strom can handle deep gravel OKish, it won't be like a KTM 450 exc, but it can be made to do OK.
Thanks again. I'm guessing the OP knows that given his MX experience.
A strom can be OKish for regular rides through 2" of crushed rock?

Now that is silly.
 

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Thanks, Dr. Phil. I'm pretty sure the OP discovered that. Or more to point: He discovered 2 inches of crushed rock.



Thanks again. I'm guessing the OP knows that given his MX experience.
A strom can be OKish for regular rides through 2" of crushed rock?

Now that is silly.
There are some unsealed roads around here that get heavy truck traffic, maintenance is dumping 4-6" of coarse sand on top, levelling it, and packing it down. Works for cars and trucks, but a DL's tyres cut right through it - so, soft surface with ruts you can't see under it.

A forkbrace and steering damper works wonders on that surface, I can only guess, but it'll probably make a big difference on the crushed rock as well.

Pete
 

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:thumbdown:

Yeah, and if you're going to ride the twisties, lose the strom & get an r1.
and
If your going you're ride the super slab, lose the Strom & get a gold wing.
and
If your going you're ride on urban commutes, lose the Strom & get a SM.
and
If your going you're ride [insert terrain type here], lose the Strom.

I find this to be this is a kind of a silly answer. People buy stroms not because they are the best at one thing, but because you can get them to handle a lot of different things.
I agree with this ^^

The guy at the dealer I bought my Glee from said the v-strom isn't great at anything, but it's good at everything. I also have a GSXR 600, and it's great on twisty roads, but that's where it ends. Getting to the roads, going to the store, long rides (even if all twisty roads) get very tiring. The vibrations are horrible. Needs gas every 100 miles, which I suppose is good because you get to rest. The most I've pushed it to as far as gas goes is 136ish miles, and I was sweating, out in the middle of Eastern Oregon. On the Glee, 136 miles and I pass the gas station up. I also find slow speed maneuvering to be much easier.

Most of us can't afford one bike of each flavor, so we settle for the package deal. If you're going to travel 50% off pavement, I'd look more into a KLR or something. They are cheap.
 

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bsbiker: My guess is that conditions of the roads you were riding on are not very common. I think you just found some crappy terrain. I bet that as you explore more unimproved roads with the wee, you will really learn to like it. I bought my wee expecting that gravel roads would be the extent of its abilities, but I have found that it can tackle a lot more than just gravel roads. I have my wee set up more for off-highway riding, and I think it's a pretty awesome bike. I have been pretty surprised at its abilities.
 

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Continental TKC-80s with 20psi front, 25 back. Brink a small air compressor that'll run off your bike battery to pump back up to spec when you're back on pavement.

Oh...and run the forks flush with the triple clamps when you're riding in loose stuff. Many of us have raised the forks to make the bike "turn-in better on pavement. On loose surfaces this makes the front end plow. For the rear, run with the least preload you can get away with, for the same reasons. This made a big difference on the Trans Labrador Highway, which is 600 miles of loose dirt, gravel and potholes.
 

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...The guy at the dealer I bought my Glee from said the v-strom isn't great at anything...
I really think this is a lame statement, which I totally disagree with, and one I see and hear all to often.

The Strom is perhaps the very greatest do it all, all things considered motorcycle ever produced, period. Although it's not going to beat out a sportbike in the twisties or on the track, it destroys it everywhere else! Although it's not going to out trail a dedicated trail bike on the trails, it will work there well enough, while destroying the trail bike everywhere else! While it may not beat a dedicated street tourer touring, it will do better than all others, and beat it everywhere else!

This is just a brief tip of the iceberg type statement, but now do you understand just how truly "great" this motorcycle is at actually being a a "motorcycle"? :mrgreen:
 

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This is just a brief tip of the iceberg type statement, but now do you understand just how truly "great" this motorcycle is at actually being a a "motorcycle"?
The greatest I've ever had, that's for sure!

It does just about everything very well, nothing spectacularly well, but the sum of the overall competency is truly awesome!

I'm loving it more every day!
 

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I got my we to explore the back roads of Oregon, boy was I in for a suprise. The roads in Oregon are made with crushed rocks, about 2" deep. A stock bike is not rideable on this type of surface. Any suggestions out there? Otherwise I might have a perfect 09 for sale. Help.
I live and ride in Central Oregon. If you're talking about the red cinder rock, it's horrible on any bike. I don't like it on my DR350. Deep gravel is also terrible to ride in, but I haven't found much around here, except on the very edges of the gravel roads or at intersections.

I agree with many of these other posts. Tire type, tire pressure and fork brace will make a big difference. I bought my Wee off a rider from Hood River who had ridden it all over Oregon, and lots offroad. He sold it to buy a KTM 990 for better offroad experience. I've only put 3000 miles on mine since February and have found it much better on the non-paved roads than I expected.

I just got rid of my Shinko 705 and put a Heidenau K60 scout on. I've only put 30 or so miles of dirt on it, but wow what a great tire.

Don't give up, you'll figure it out.
 

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I will say that on our journey on the Trans Labrador Highway we met up with a number of other riders and "locals," some of whom commute a hundred miles each way. Many of the "tourist" riders on the TLH were on Kawasaki KRL 650s, with a few BMW GS 1200 and a couple of GS 800s. Virtually all of the locals rode KLR 650s. I didn't see another 'Strom up there besides mine.
 

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Oregon Roads

I got my we to explore the back roads of Oregon, boy was I in for a suprise. The roads in Oregon are made with crushed rocks, about 2" deep. A stock bike is not rideable on this type of surface. Any suggestions out there? Otherwise I might have a perfect 09 for sale. Help.
HI there and welcome. I live in Oregon and define back roads, do you mean like fire trail roads? I ride those, albeit slowly to go to some lakes I fish at. I do slip and slide and do plan on some knobbys at some point, but it is doable if careful.
 
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