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The Brits have an expression for the most common form of multi-vehicle accident: "Sorry Mate, I didn't See You" or SMIDSY.

The Hurt Report detailed how left-turning cars that did not see an approaching motorcyclist account for more than half of multi-vehicle crashes involving motorcycles when other factors (alcohol, etc) are removed.

If you are impatient but want a technique to help reduce the likelihood of this happening to you, go to the 5:00 mark of the video.

I've been doing the same thing since 1985, when I lived in a small town with a lot of side streets. Tried everything: different colored helmets and jackets, waving, flashing headlights - without much effect. Tried the weave, it worked, and been doing it since. The video explains why: it minimizes the physiological effect of "Looming."



 

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I've been doing that for almost the full 40 years I've been riding [an old rider taught it to me].

I also use a range of other tactics that keep me in the visible points of car drivers.

I move around behind the car from one external mirror to the other, never directly behind the car.

Moving around when there is oncoming traffic also makes a bike more visible to cars that may be about to overtake the one you can see coming towards you.

We are entitled to use the lane we are travelling in and I use ALL of it to keep myself as safe as possible.
 

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Wasn't able to view the video, but have a theory about cager turn-ins. I owned a Honda Element years ago and found myself pulling out in front of cars I never saw. It was a left turn onto a road. The Element had a huge windshield post. I finally realized that cars were hidden behind that wide post and I had to make a point of moving my head to see around it. I think it happens to a lesser extent on other cars especially with a thinner MC. If the video is about making S turns as you approach an intersection, I could see how that might help. No chance of changing driver habits about looking carefully.
 

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Another advantage of the weave is that motorists put extra distance between themselves and that motorcycle rider who might be drunk or something else evidently wrong with them.........:yesnod:
 

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"Element had a huge windshield post."

I noticed that on a Jeep I drove. Really poor engineering on the makers part.
But little brains are responsible for the preponderance of the crashes. Lack of income...they couldn't afford to pay attention.
 

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Another advantage of the weave is that motorists put extra distance between themselves and that motorcycle rider who might be drunk or something else evidently wrong with them.........:yesnod:
I've been doing the weave the last couple of years. I agree, not only do the cars (usually) notice you, they fear for their own safety with this weaving lunatic ready to head right for them.

I think it works. It's fun. It's cheap insurance. I also think that because you are in a dynamic mode already, actively handling your bike rather than in some sublime resting-on-your-haunches state, you're in a better position to quickly make any avoidance moves.

Marc
 

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Wow, I've been riding for 15 years and have never heard if this. I'll start doing it immediately. It will be nice to be able to do something about that anticipation period when I see a teenager on his or her cellphone about to turn in front of me. Thanks!

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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I was taught that also by a very old rider he weaved all the time I think most of the time it was because he was drunk. I weave at all intersections that I come across except I do not drink and I believe it helps alot.:thumbup:

Respectfully. Doug
 

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I've been doing this for a while now as well with good results (apparently) but oddly enough in one incident I seem to have angered a motorist by doing it, for reasons I have not been able to figure out.

Traveling through a town with a typical 5-lane main street - two in each direction and one center turn lane - I was in the leftmost lane approaching someone coming the other way, sitting in the center turn lane waiting to turn left across my path. Typical anti-SMIDSY-weave scenario. So I did the weave as I approached, and as I went by she was yelling something out the window at me. In the split-second I passed right by her and had close eye contact she was clearly quite torqued. I was going the speed limit, not holding her up or anything, so it was either she thought I was drunk or was pissed about my riding, I don't know. Don't care much either, other than it stands out as a curiousity to me.
 

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The video might be spot on for British drivers, but it is far too generous for US drivers, who do so many things wrong you can hardly list them all. I treat every vehicle entering my path as threat.
 

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While I suppose it's ok to weave at every intersection don't loose sight of what he said "if the background is not moving behind the suspect car it's not moving behind you" That's when the weave is called for. If it is moving behind the suspect car it's not really needed.
ps It's kind of fun to look for background movement as a drill.
 

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I've been doing the weave the last couple of years. I agree, not only do the cars (usually) notice you, they fear for their own safety with this weaving lunatic ready to head right for them.

I think it works. It's fun. It's cheap insurance. I also think that because you are in a dynamic mode already, actively handling your bike rather than in some sublime resting-on-your-haunches state, you're in a better position to quickly make any avoidance moves.

Marc
The video might be spot on for British drivers, but it is far too generous for US drivers, who do so many things wrong you can hardly list them all. I treat every vehicle entering my path as threat.


Marc, like you, I only started doing this when I got the strom two years ago, not sure why, but have noticed far fewer incursions into my bubble since I started. I also agree that it keeps you actively involved in your safety, unlike passsive measures like flashers and hig-viz stuff.

Ald, I still treat every vehicle as if they are going for my hide, but notice far fewer do come after me.
 

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Wasn't able to view the video, but have a theory about cager turn-ins. I owned a Honda Element years ago and found myself pulling out in front of cars I never saw. It was a left turn onto a road. The Element had a huge windshield post. I finally realized that cars were hidden behind that wide post and I had to make a point of moving my head to see around it. I think it happens to a lesser extent on other cars especially with a thinner MC. If the video is about making S turns as you approach an intersection, I could see how that might help. No chance of changing driver habits about looking carefully.
All modern cars seem to come with huge blind spots, now. In front you can probably thank rollover protection requirements, SRS side curtain airbags, and steeply raked windshield that put the A-pillar much closer to you. I've also noticed that the rear pillar (usually the C, sometimes B or D) on many cars these days is very large. On many new CUVs I've seen, what looks like a nice big expanse of glass at the rear turns out from the inside to be concealing very thick rear pillars and rear hatch frames. Partially a result of lazy engineering, I think, and putting styling before practicality. My Volvo 245 (wagon), Nissan Multi (Stanza Wagon in the US) and Nissan Micra, all wagons/hatchbacks, did not have this problem, in fact they had nice large rear windows and reasonably slender pillars and surrounds that allowed a decent rearward view. Well, I guess now rear view cameras are getting to be almost standard - in fact, I seem to recall hearing that the US gov't (NHTSA or some such?) was talking about making them mandatory (maybe only for SUVs?).


Anyway, good to keep bringing up the SMIDSY factory, and the psychology behind it. Once you're really aware of it, it becomes almost automatic to look for places where it might be happening, and take action (lateral movement) to reduce the risk.
 

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The video might be spot on for British drivers, but it is far too generous for US drivers, who do so many things wrong you can hardly list them all. I treat every vehicle entering my path as threat.
I have an instinct for bad drivers. I can usually spot the ones that are going to do something squirrely because they're usually already doing something that makes them stand out. You know what I mean, without being able to put your finger on it exactly, or explain it in words, you just know that car is going to make an unsignalled lang change right in front of you. I listen to my instincts.
 

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A big THANKS for that video. I've been riding for ~40+ yrs. Always thought the worst was the car turning left in front of you accross your path. That where most of my friends bought it. I have always looked for good ways to be seen. Looks like I need to include this in my arsenal.
 

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i like this idea and can agree with the results and reasoning... have any of you talked with any law enforcement about this type of maneuver?? i dont remember this being taught in the motorcycle safety class i took about a year ago. wonder if law enforcement might think we r being a hooligan... i'll have to ask a few clients of mine who are local LEO's and see what their thoughts are....
 

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..wonder if law enforcement might think we r being a hooligan... i'll have to ask a few clients of mine who are local LEO's and see what their thoughts are....
I really couldn't care what the LEOs think, we're talking survival here...

Motorcyclist dies after crash north of Gracefield, Que.

Sûreté de Québec Sgt. Gregory Gomez del Prado said a woman in her 60s was driving a vehicle north and was turning left into a restaurant parking lot at 197 Route 105, but she did not see the motorcyclist heading south toward her.

The two vehicles crashed head-on, Gomez del Prado said.

The man was taken to hospital, where he was pronounced dead. The woman was not injured.
:headbang:
 
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