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Discussion Starter #1
I was thinking of taking a chance on these cheap Chinese auxiliary lights: https://www.ebay.com/itm/2x-125W-U5-Motorcycle-Bike-LED-Headlight-Driving-Fog-Spot-Light-Lamp-1-Switch/253587352968?ssPageName=STRK:MEBIDX:IT&_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649

No instructions are included. How do you think they hook up? Do the wires get spliced into the headlight wires? Here's what they publish for installation:
Installation:

Comes with bracket, screws and tools, just fixed it.

Red Wire: Positive

White Wire: Negative

2) Kill Switch:

2 Wire connection

15w draw. Can the headlight circuit handle another 15-30 watts?
 

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I have those on my bike and they work just fine. The mounts are a little wonky, so you'll need to fidget with them to get the beam spread you like best. I used vampire connectors to tap into the wires. No fires yet. Have not had any voltage issues either, even during cold times when I run my heated seat.

EDIT: Correction, I have the U7 version. But no problems...
 

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I would not splice into the headlight circuit. I recommend either the heated grip plug or running a separate circuit. Eastern Beaver has multiple options but with the price of those lights, you might be looking for a cheaper solution.
 

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Lots of threads on a related topic from way before my time here: unless you've added a relay-based solution to your headlight wiring, you're at risk of problems with your starter switch.

For cheap, wire the aux lights to a relay -- relay to the battery for power and to a switched wire for triggering the relay.

For more money, and more flexibility if you have the need for it: wire them to a switched fuse panel (I use the Eastern Beaver PC-8 ).

I went the fuse panel route, as I have a bunch of other stuff wired up to the switched fuse panel. FWIW, I also added the EB headlight relay kit. You could do it cheaper on your own, but I found it worth the price of not dorking around with it myself.
 

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After a glace through some of those other threads, I'll be changing my wiring. With the heated Corbin, there is an extra relay and fuse block. No need to risk burning out my starter switch. Lots of non-riding time now while I let my arm heal...
 

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I don't ride at night much but I do use fork lights to make the bike more conspicuous to traffic. I have used these for a while and at first I was a bit skeptical of the mount. Thinking that it would just be able to maintain the light's position with the various bumps and jiggles that it would be subjected to. After riding about 2,000 miles of gravel/dirt roads, they have remained good and solid. I just bolted them on using the mounting point of the side reflector. Inexpensive and very bright.

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B06Y1QJP37/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Wired from an auxiliary fuse box, through a swithch. I did not use a relay since they draw so little amperage.
 

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as mentioned in post #4 I wouldn't use the headlight circuit unless it has been upgraded with a relay. Folks have reported problems with it as it is and adding more load would increase that likelihood. I wired my auxiliary lights off the connector on the right side of the fairing with a generic motorcycle handlebar switch in the circuit.

if you haven't already consider adding a headlight relay. Less chance of damage to the headlight circuit...no fun losing your lights at night and brighter headlights result because they are getting the full voltage.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have no idea of how to add a relay to the headlights. I was thinking I could just wire these lights directly to the battery and use the switch provided. Is there a video or tutorial? Thanks.
 

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I have no idea of how to add a relay to the headlights. I was thinking I could just wire these lights directly to the battery and use the switch provided. Is there a video or tutorial? Thanks.
you could do that, add a fuse if one isn't provided.

for a headlight relay many get a kit from here and it is pretty much plug and play......

H4 Kits

lots of information and help available re headlight relays on the forum.
 

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Lots of threads on a related topic from way before my time here: unless you've added a relay-based solution to your headlight wiring, you're at risk of problems with your starter switch.

For cheap, wire the aux lights to a relay -- relay to the battery for power and to a switched wire for triggering the relay.

For more money, and more flexibility if you have the need for it: wire them to a switched fuse panel (I use the Eastern Beaver PC-8 ).

I went the fuse panel route, as I have a bunch of other stuff wired up to the switched fuse panel. FWIW, I also added the EB headlight relay kit. You could do it cheaper on your own, but I found it worth the price of not dorking around with it myself.

Agree with all inputs: don't use existing headlamp circuit. I have a switched relay to an aux. fusebox; it's a fun installation and draws power from the battery via the switch ( I would forget the light was on when the key was out This solves the problem: no ignition, no power). I bought cheap LED spots on ebay and they have been perfectly waterproof for 3 years. They are attached to my engine guards.

The relay will have 4 points on it, marked 30, 87, 85 and 86. That is kind of cryptic, isn’t it?


30 and 87 create the switch to your lights. By default this switch is open, so the current cannot get from the battery to your lights.

30 – is your power source for your light. It connects to the positive (+) side of your battery or to a switched power source that only gets power when your ignition is on.
87 – goes to the positive side of your LED lights.

85 and 86 use electrical current to create a magnetic force, which then closes the 30 to 87 switch and allows the electricity to flow to your lights. Without this current, no magnetic force is created, so the 30 to 87 switch stays open, and your lights stay off.

85 – connects to the power source that you want controlling the switch. For example you could splice a wire off your high beam wire or off your backup light wire
86 – connect to a ground.
 

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You might want to bookmark this page.

https://www.vstrom.info/Smf/index.php/topic,1461.0.html

Lot's of good information and a link to how to wire a relay from scratch.

You can buy a relay at an auto parts store and wire it yourself, but most people, even those experienced and competent with electrical projects usually preferred a pre-wired harness intended for auxiliary lights. The cost of the harness is often less than the sum of its parts and therefore a very good deal.

We have high quality extremely durable lights, wiring harnesses designed for the bikes we support, and light bars on our website, but just right now sold out on wiring harnesses. You can find generic wiring harnesses on Ebay.
 
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