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Here's an interesting idea that I just came across in my news feed.
I've put 200 down to see if they'll make 650 version.
 

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Looks a little scary, all electronic and cable actuated. Not linked in with the hydraulics at all. I could see a system like that where there is a pressure sensor tap in the front brake line, but they are relying on finger pressure against part of the lever.
 

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Liked brakes on a motorcycle is not new tech. Guzzi did it 40 years ago. Some people liked it (I didn't mind) others de-linked them for more traditional brakes.

The foot pedal worked one front caliper and the rear caliper. The hand lever operated the other caliper independently.

It interesting because you get use to just hitting the brake pedal to stop. Then hop on a traditional braked bike and your stomping down on the brake pedal wonder why you are not slowing down.
 

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I mostly developed my skills on dirt bikes, where it was routine to lock up the rear wheel. So it doesn't bother me much to do it on a street bike. And for certain things, like low-speed maneuvering, handy to modulate the rear brake alone. I have linked braking on one of my scooters, and if there was an economical way to 'unlink' I'd do it. Certainly in a panic-stop situation, the weight transfer to the front wheel almost makes the rear brake useless anyway. I hope their linked system has a proportioning curve that progressively sends less pressure to the rear brake.
 

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I have 2 bikes with linked brakes. Honda ST1300 and Honda CBR1100XX. Apply front brake and it operates front brakes as well as one (of 2) piston on the rear wheel. Operate the rear pedal and it operates the 2 pistons of the rear as well as one (out of three) pistons on the front. They are virtually seamless in operation and, at least on the street, I see no reason to delink them other than bar room bragging rights about how you can be a virtuoso in using racing braking techniques. It is a very complicated system involving proportioning valves, secondary master cylinders, and more tubes than I have blood vessels. The only downside, from my point, is that the systems are finicky to bleed correctly.

I can see how a linked brake system would not be advantageous on the dirt though.

I would be very leery of an aftermarket system. There is more to it than just simply applying the other brake.
 

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. It is a very complicated system involving proportioning valves, secondary master cylinders, and more tubes than I have blood vessels. The only downside, from my point, is that the systems are finicky to bleed correctly.
I suspect it will become a maintenance issue at some point, and as mentioned it is an absolute nightmare to bleed. I kind of wonder about uneven brake pad wear as well, if only the front brake is applied under normal use. And I need to modulate two controls, instead of one, to get max braking. Mostly the answer to a question that I've never asked. Not a fan of systems that allege to help, but mostly just get in the way.
 

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My buddy removed the ABS from one of his bikes. All told the components weighted something in excess 20 pounds. Wonder where the crossover point is where the "effectiveness" of ABS is undone by the weight of the ABS components.
 

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What a sensationalist article. As if breaking in the front without applying the rear would instantly send you over the handlebars. The rear brake does nothing to make the bike “hunker down”, this claim is complete BS.
This has been the common myth for decades. A lot of the old school Harley riders still believe this to be true.
 

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This has been the common myth for decades. A lot of the old school Harley riders still believe this to be true.
What a sensationalist article. As if breaking in the front without applying the rear would instantly send you over the handlebars. The rear brake does nothing to make the bike “hunker down”, this claim is complete BS.
Never had linked brakes and have never ridden a bike with them. However, as a general rule, I use both front and rear brakes in normal riding conditions. I do this for the following reasons.
  • Practice for when I absolutely need all the braking available. Emergencies.
  • Applying the back brake only in the Twisties can help settle the chassis AND distribute more weight to the front tire. in tight corners (after of course using both the front and rear brakes to slow the entrance into the corner).
YEMV
YEMV.JPG
 

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I tend to use only the front brakes in normal situations. The back brake only in the corners if I really need to. And both when I need to really stop quick. I find that the Vstrom especially is prone to rear wheel lockup compared to my other bikes. I find it odd since I've got a lot of weight back, but it may be due to the squishy nature of the suspension.
 

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I suspect it will become a maintenance issue at some point, and as mentioned it is an absolute nightmare to bleed. I kind of wonder about uneven brake pad wear as well, if only the front brake is applied under normal use. And I need to modulate two controls, instead of one, to get max braking. Mostly the answer to a question that I've never asked. Not a fan of systems that allege to help, but mostly just get in the way.
Well if it becomes an maintenance issue, I haven't encountered it in over 400k miles of riding with it. All that is required is routine maintenance like any other system. It just may take a bit longer to do and is a bit finiky as I said, but certainly not a nightmare. Uneven pad wear?.....no reason for it. I mistakenly said the rear caliper only had 2 pistons, when in fact it has 3 so the pads are applied evenly if the linked system is activated. And as for modulating the braking.....you ride like any other system ie. you still modulate the both controls as needed . I think, from your post, that you don't really understand how it works but I could be wrong.
 

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On my scooter, the front lever works one piston on the front caliper, the other lever works the other piston and the rear brake which could easily 'cock' the caliper. So definitely capable of uneven pad wear, I'd say. Realize that keeping my bikes 15-20 years is the norm. If the proportioning valve craps out, either no rear brakes, or way too much. Got a bit of air in the system when bleeding it, right after I got it, spent a day and a half, and a quart of brake fluid, getting MOST of it out. Entailed removing both calipers so the bleeder screws were at the high points (with appropriate spacers between the pads), not to mention raising the rear caliper above the high point of the rear brake line, which looped several inches above it. I'm guessing a power bleeder (assuming it could get past the proportioning valve) would be the way to go. Oh, and you have to remove most of the plastic on the front to get to the appropriate parts.

Does it sound like I lack an understanding of the system?

Mostly I miss the ability to 'drag' the back brake only in slow speed turns, especially a necessity when working with a variator and centrifugal clutch.

I got by nicely with separate brakes for the first 40 years of my riding career.
 

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Jim,
I have no idea what your "scooter" is, but it doesn't sound like it has the linked type system that my Hondas do. The rear caliper has 3 pistons and it is only the center one that is activated by the front lever so the pads get pushed evenly, not "cocked". Same for the back pedal....it only activates the center piston on the front calipers.

As for "dragging" the rear brake.....still easy to do with the system I am familiar with. Rear pedal makes the rear brake come on much more than the front brakes. If you didn't know about the linking, you would be hard pressed to tell that it had it. YMMV

And yes, bleeding and flushing the system is finicky. I find tapping the calipers, with a rubber hammer helps and also applying the brakes overnight and then bleeding again helps. Hang a weight on the pedal and a strong rubber band on the lever and leave it overnight.
 

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Actually, I can tell, as the front suspension compresses when I activate the 'linked' system, which is precisely what I'm trying to avoid when attempting a delicate maneuver. On scooters (and DCT's I presume) there is no way to 'feather' the clutch, it's pretty much in or out. To counter that in slow maneuvers it'd be nice if I could drag just the rear brake to control the amount of thrust. But no. The 'linked' lever seems to have equal 'power' to the front lever so the effect is pronounced. Which also means in a 'panic' situation BOTH levers need to be applied and modulated to achieve maximum front braking. Obviously systems vary from one bike to another. Much like Occam, I see no point to multiplicity without necessity. As I mentioned, if there was an economic method of removing the linked system, I'd do so.

My other scooter uses a cable to the rear (drum) brake and a linking cable to the front master cylinder to 'link' the brakes, so I just backed off the linking cable until there's not much effect.
 

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I rode my girlfriend's Guzzi Le Mans III quite a lot (35 yrs ago) and it had the linked brakes. Didn't mind it, but didn't see the point but at least it was simple. I'd rather have a stock brake setup, certainly wouln't add more complication/maintenance issues to solve a problem that doesn't exist.
My complaint with my 2012 650 brakes is the total lack of feel in the back brake. I've fitted an ABS switch which is great in the dirt, but find the rear brake needs a lot of pressure to work at all and I can't feel what its doing until it locks. Worst brake of any bike I've owned/ridden in the last 45 years. Total contrast to the fronts which are great.
 

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The rear brake has been described to me as being "wooden" and I agree.
 
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