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I like to be a conscientious rider and supporter of my fellow riders.
When I pass a police officer I let any up coming riders know with a pat on my head.
But how far away from the officer do you stop giving notice to other riders?
1 mile? 2? more?

Just curious what the guidelines might be.
 

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I have never been one to warn anybody, but I would say a mile would be more than adequate.
 

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Careful, in many places this is considered obstructing the duties of a police officer. I've actually seen a second officer stationed down the road watching for lights flashing, etc.
But then I'd say a mile as well.
 

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Careful, in many places this is considered obstructing the duties of a police officer. I've actually seen a second officer stationed down the road watching for lights flashing, etc.
Never heard of that. Curious as to what they can do to you... Give you a ticket for flashing your lights or touching your helmet? I'd lawyer up and spend my last penny fighting it on principle

Typed on my phone while riding...there might be spelling errors
 

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I agree. About a mile. But I would never have known what a pat on the head meant before I read it here. A light flash is more common
 

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I have heard about the head pat thing... Here in Canada (Ontario at least) we warn oncoming drivers of police presence by flashing our high beams...
 

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I always, without fail, every time, as soon as I see a police officer, I point to the sky and wave my hand in a circular motion (indicating a rotating light) to every vehicle. Seems to work as riders and drivers acknowledge and its fun to see them hit the brakes....f*ck the police :thumbup:
 

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I have a radar detector, if you're one to speed more than 5 over w/o one then you're asking for a ticket. Coming from an experienced pro at "blue-blind speeding".

That said, EMFH on the road, I am only courteous to other courteous people and I ride like everyone is drunk.


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I always signal if I see the popo checking speeds. Touching the helmet is one way to do it. If another cop down the road pulled me over for signaling I would simply tell him I was adjusting my helmet vents.
 

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Patting the top of your helmet is the universal warning, but a lot of people don't know it. If I have time I'll signal to slow and spin my finger in the air. Everyone seems to get that. Depending on where I am, I may warn MC's for 5 miles or more. At the dragon everyone sees to know and use the pat.
 

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I normally don't do anything. Besides, 10 mph over 'usually' won't get a person pulled over. This I am okay with, but anything above that DESERVES a side-line time out.

What is the goal? At what point do you HOPE or WANT the on-coming traffic to get pulled over?

Would you purposely flash your lights or tap your head at a person going 85 mph in a 30 mph?

Excessive speeders (20+ mph) are the very same people who run red lights, turn left against opposing traffic, and tailgate motorcyclists. I don't care for those types of drivers.
 

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I spoke to soon. (a friend actually got in trouble many years ago)

So I looked up the penal code:

§ 38.15. INTERFERENCE WITH PUBLIC DUTIES. (a) A person
commits an offense if the person with criminal negligence
interrupts, disrupts, impedes, or otherwise interferes with:
(a)(1) a peace officer while the peace officer is performing a duty or exercising authority imposed or granted by law.
(b) An offense under this section is a Class B misdemeanor.
(c) It is a defense to prosecution under Subsection (a)(1)
that the conduct engaged in by the defendant was intended to warn a
person operating a motor vehicle of the presence of a peace officer
who was enforcing Subtitle C, Title 7, Transportation Code.

I edited out all the other junk and stuck with the subject of the tread.

So it appears that after August, 2007 it is allowed, at least in Texas. So pat away.
 

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For me it depends on traffic. If there are many drivers then I'll try to tap my helmet as long as I pass past the "herd". If I see only a few drivers, usually 2-3 miles worth, that's as far as I'll go.
 

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Something I learned recently - it is illegal in WA to flash your high beams, for any reason. I used to flash oncoming traffic to remind them to dim their lights, but no more...

I've never seen the head tap thing.
 

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I have heard about the head pat thing... Here in Canada (Ontario at least) we warn oncoming drivers of police presence by flashing our high beams...
We do that in cars, but most riders I know if pat the head.

As far as how far a lot depends on the road. If it was a road that you will for sure be riding on over the next 5 or 10 miles or even more I would probably warn people (i.e. for Ontarians riding on 507)

..Tom
 

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Careful, in many places this is considered obstructing the duties of a police officer. I've actually seen a second officer stationed down the road watching for lights flashing, etc.
But then I'd say a mile as well.
It's perfectly okay in Ontario Canada. Police were charging people under a code that said that drivers could not alternate the headlights but that made the news and blew up in their face. They don't like it though.

..Tom
 

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I normally don't do anything. Besides, 10 mph over 'usually' won't get a person pulled over. This I am okay with, but anything above that DESERVES a side-line time out.

What is the goal? At what point do you HOPE or WANT the on-coming traffic to get pulled over?

Would you purposely flash your lights or tap your head at a person going 85 mph in a 30 mph?

Excessive speeders (20+ mph) are the very same people who run red lights, turn left against opposing traffic, and tailgate motorcyclists. I don't care for those types of drivers.
There are people that are crazy drivers that drive fast, and people that are perfectly good drivers that drive fast.


As far as someone going 80 in a 30: in theory the object of radar is to save lives. If someone was going that fast and you didn't warn him of radar and he did't slow down and ended up killing the police or someone else how would you feel?

There are desolate roads north of here where a mile out of town the speed drops from 50 to 30 mph, in spite of there being no homes or any other real reason for the drop that early. 60 or 70 mph is a realistic speed on those roads unti lyou get close to the town. If you rode into the road at 60 or 70 and didn't realize it had dropped that much and got dinged by radar sitting there how would you feel? What if that meant you lost your vehicle and license for a week on the spot without a trial?

..Tom
 

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I thought it was mainly European thing to warn others about police down the road. I have never encountered that here in Chicago area. Back in the old country we did that within a mile from the patrol car, but like others said it, you could get in trouble if found doing that. High beem were often used to warn the oncoming drivers and riders.
 

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I don't do anything to warn anybody. I don't feel that I have the responsibility to watch out for what others are doing. If they are speeding, then that is their own risk.

B.
 
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