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Discussion Starter #1
I installed Rox 2" risers and following the info found in the other tread I rerouted the cabling and hoses behind the top triple clamp. It seems to be fine like that, clutch hose has a lot of slack but the front brake - it looks to be pretty tight on that metal connector attached to the frame by the steering head. So my question: If I was to have a failure in that area (or any other) that would cause the fluid to leak from the front brake system and therefore cause loss of pressure in it will it affect also the rear brake?
 

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No it will not! They are not connected in our bikes.

But that transition piece is very tough and will not easily be damaged. In fact I helped the same problem by carefully bending the pipe sections, made a little bracket and moved the block upwards a little and thus gained a little more slack for my setup. Not that I recommend you do this but I am not concerned about losing the front brakes.
 

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I believe the front and rear weren't connected until the 2018 model. Some rear is applied when the front is used.
 

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The front and rear brakes are connected on the 2018 models but not in the typical sense that brakes are “linked” or “combined” on a motorcycle. Rather than the front and rear brakes working together under ordinary circumstances, the Suzuki system allows the ABS system, not the rider, to shift brake pressure from a slipping wheel to the other wheel.

I used to ride a 1994 CBR1000F Sport-Tourer with Honda’s “Combined Braking System”; a design in which the the front calipers proportionately powered one piston on the rear caliper and the rear caliper powered one piston on each front caliper. Some people didn’t like it but I thought it worked very, very well and I think I’m pretty picky about brakes.
 

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The front and rear brakes are connected on the 2018 models but not in the typical sense that brakes are “linked” or “combined” on a motorcycle. Rather than the front and rear brakes working together under ordinary circumstances, the Suzuki system allows the ABS system, not the rider, to shift brake pressure from a slipping wheel to the other wheel.

I used to ride a 1994 CBR1000F Sport-Tourer with Honda’s “Combined Braking System”; a design in which the the front calipers proportionately powered one piston on the rear caliper and the rear caliper powered one piston on each front caliper. Some people didn’t like it but I thought it worked very, very well and I think I’m pretty picky about brakes.
My VFR 800 (6th gen) had the linked brakes as well...I thought Honda did a great bit of engineering. When using front lever only at the track, would get just enough rear brake to settle the chassis...

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My question was purely regarding the physical, pressurized connection between the two ends. I was mainly concerned there may be some common cylinder or something like that in the ABS pump that could cause loss of braking power on one end when the other end is open. Linked brakes (or partially linked) are fine but it's a whole different animal.
 

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My question was purely regarding the physical, pressurized connection between the two ends. I was mainly concerned there may be some common cylinder or something like that in the ABS pump that could cause loss of braking power on one end when the other end is open. Linked brakes (or partially linked) are fine but it's a whole different animal.
If the bike has a separate reservoir to fill (front and back) with DOT4 then they are separate lines.
 

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If the bike has a separate reservoir to fill (front and back) with DOT4 then they are separate lines.
Not necessarily. My FJR1300 has a front and rear reservoir. The rear brake actuates the 2 rear cylinders and one of the front right cylinders. There is a proportioning valve that regulates this to work only during hard braking.
 

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Not necessarily. My FJR1300 has a front and rear reservoir. The rear brake actuates the 2 rear cylinders and one of the front right cylinders. There is a proportioning valve that regulates this to work only during hard braking.
Except we are talking about a V-Strom, not an FJR. :)
 

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Except we are talking about a V-Strom, not an FJR. :)
I responding to a post that stated "If the bike has a separate reservoir to fill (front and back) with DOT4 then they are separate lines."
Every Vstrom I've ever seen has 2 reservoirs so I assumed this statement was aimed at motorcycles in general.
 

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I responding to a post that stated "If the bike has a separate reservoir to fill (front and back) with DOT4 then they are separate lines."
Every Vstrom I've ever seen has 2 reservoirs so I assumed this statement was aimed at motorcycles in general.
Well OK, since we have deviated from the topic of Vstroms, why would an FJR have two reservoirs if they share the same fluid? How does that work?
 

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Well OK, since we have deviated from the topic of Vstroms, why would an FJR have two reservoirs if they share the same fluid? How does that work?
The FJR has one reservoir for the front brake system and one for the rear. The rear system has a proportioning valve and a brake line that will actuate the front lower right cylinder under heavy braking. The front right brake cylinder has 2 lines going to it.
 
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