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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Last year, pickup truck beside me honked pointed at my back tire and said, "your tire is flat!" Drove real slow to a gas station it was a pancake. Filled up the tire, then drove home, filled again then off to the dealer, it was an embedded screw, and got the tire replaced.

I do check pressure periodically and give the tires a good kick before I ride. I did notice that I could flat foot easier and was wondering why at the time, I was lucky was in town and no long highway driving.

Thing is, this probably happened while riding and I want to look into a TPMS system, has anyone used them before? Any suggestions?
 

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I've looked around myself for something non-obtrusive. I wish the Zumo 390 was out when I got the 350, since it has an integrated TPMS (you just have to buy the sensors).
I've also looked at this one. The only thing keeping me from buying it, has been having to put another electronic gizmo on the handlebars...

TireGard 13-318 (there's another model with a keyfob instead, but same thing I'm also looking at).

 

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Something to consider when doing the TPM is the cost of repairs when the battery dies. The units on my BMW were, to me, prohibitively expensive.
There are sensors that replace your valve cap that may be satisfactory.
It's a great idea but a pricey farkle. An oft used 10 dollar tire gauge might be the poor man's alternative.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
For the Garmin, do you need to buy one of the GPS systems? I agree with the obtrusive comment BKP. Would really like to have one though my Android Note 3 phone as I use that as my GPS, Music, etc. I dont want another display on my handle bars if it can be avoided but, that large screen one looks good but running out of room now.
 

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Something to consider when doing the TPM is the cost of repairs when the battery dies. The units on my BMW were, to me, prohibitively expensive.
There are sensors that replace your valve cap that may be satisfactory.
It's a great idea but a pricey farkle. An oft used 10 dollar tire gauge might be the poor man's alternative.


Think I found your problem right there :)

So, that Garmin thing, assuming you have the appropriate Garmin Nav, doesnt look bad. Simply screws on the valve stem, sends pressure data to the unit. Uses standard batteries that cost under $3 each, can be bought at Wal-Mart, and are user replaceable

. http://www.batteriesinaflash.com/coin-cells/cr1225/panasonic-cr1225-lithium-3v-coin-cell-battery-br1225-ecr1225
 

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Had it on my C14, and hated the stupid system.
 

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Check the oil level, chain tension and TIRE PRESSURE before every ride.
That's the rules.
 
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I have valve stem caps that show the pressure is at 35 psi. $10.00 I think.
 

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I have been using the Tyredog TPMS on my car for years and I think they are the best invention ever, with the warnings they have given me I have been able to choose where and when I fix a puncher, they will give a low pressure warning you can then keep a eye on your pressures and drive to a safe place or as in my case each time I have driven to a service station were I pluged the tyre and used their compressor to inflate the tyre again.

the hand unit uses 12v or AAA batteries and last around 8 months, the sender unit batteries are about $2each and last me about 12 months, because the unit goes to sleep the amount you drive will determine the battery's life.

On my bike I use the TPMS brand, it does not seem to be the quality of the Tyredog but it works just fine, if you do a seach on this forum you will find photos and posts from me about this unit.

In OZ Dealextreme have the car unit for $142, that is less than the cost of one tyre and this unit will stop tyre damage so it will very quickly pay for itself and on a bike it could be a life saver.

ps: before I got the bike unit I would take the one off my car and fit it to my bike for any long rides and I have had no problems with rubber valve stems even at 200kph.
 
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For the Garmin, do you need to buy one of the GPS systems? I agree with the obtrusive comment BKP. Would really like to have one though my Android Note 3 phone as I use that as my GPS, Music, etc. I dont want another display on my handle bars if it can be avoided but, that large screen one looks good but running out of room now.
Yup....the Garmin sensors are only compatible with the Zumo 390 & 590.
 

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Reviving the question about TPM

After jet another flat rear I am determined to install a "permanent" tire pressure monitor. Last year I had a bad blowout at 75mph and on one of the NEVA return trips I had another rear puncture a couple of years ago. In each case early warning would have been a big help, especially the blowout on the interstate that resulted in a badly damaged tire.

So the renewed question; is anybody using (and happy with) a permanent in wheel installed sensor and 12V wired display unit that gives instant warning if there is a loss of pressure and gives reliable continuous reading of pressure in both wheels?

Please no suggestions of a screw on cap sensor that needs a phone to display. Also I looked at the Garmin sensors (have a Zumo590) but there are lot of reliability issues with those and they tend to leak so I have discarded them as an option as well. I want something that is always active and capable of handling any weather conditions etc. and comes on when I start the bike.
 

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had this for a few years now.....very very useful

Forget about the in wheel sensor ...this works and is reliable. I use it every day. Noticed today my rear was down to 39.
I don't trust anything else BUT this.

Batteries last a long time and are standard and easy to change
 
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... Also I looked at the Garmin sensors (have a Zumo 590) but there are lot of reliability issues with those and they tend to leak so I have discarded them as an option as well. I want something that is always active and capable of handling any weather conditions etc. and comes on when I start the bike.
There were some early issues with the system on the Garmin 590's that were fixed with software. (I don't know about the 390.) I have to say it is very stable and works extremely well on my 2015 DL1000. I have put over 76,000 km/ over 47,000 miles on mine in temperatures ranging from -10c (14°) to 32°c/90°f, in pouring rain, etc and they always worked. The batteries aren't too thrilled with temperatures much below freezing and it gives the odd low battery warning in that case but it is more of a minor annoyance rather than an issue as they still worked.

One thing that can happen with any TPMS system is interference with cars. I am in the Auto industry (I sell Porsche's) and have heard stories of systems (of all kinds of manufacturers) sometimes losing connections with the TPMS when beside other vehicles. The systems work again right away once away from the other vehicle.

As has been mentioned the Garmin system just is a different valve cap and you don't have to take the wheel apart to change batteries. You DO have to have a metal valve stems though so you should install them when you next change tires if you are getting the Garmin System. I have not had any issues with leaking that could attributed to the valve caps. By watching the tire pressure I noticed a very slow leak in my rear tire that turned out to be two very close leaks less than an inch apart that likely was caused by a staple. It took me several weeks to realize it was a puncture rather than the normal changes attributed to temperature swings as the drop was so minor. (It took soap bubbles to find them.)

..Tom
 

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My BMW has the factory TPM system. I don't use it to "set" pressures. But I do find myself bringing up the readout on the dash when I feel something funny. You know, that squirm that means a tire going down! But, so far, I have not had a tire go down. It is nice to see the display and know it is ok.

BUT...in typical BMW fashion.....it compensates for internal tire temperature and pressure. Meaning it calculates what it sees and then reads out what the temperature would be at 68 degrees with a tire that has not been ridden recently. Which means it can and does read lower than actual pressures at times and I just cannot trust that. Just give me the $%&* pressure in the tire and I will calculate if it is ok or not....

There have been a number of riders that have been warned by a caution symbol when tires get below a certain pressure. So it works and works well for a monitoring device. I like having it.
 

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We have a TST TPMS T515 on a monster fifth wheel because the tires are too far back to know if you have a flat and a flat is a very bad thing for more than a few seconds on one of these. It works great and supports up to something like 22 tires for truckers. There is also a rear camera on all of the time just like my V2.

It would be nice on the bike.

https://www.amazon.com/EEZTire-Tire-Pressure-Monitoring-System/dp/B009BFPT8I

 

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As has been mentioned the Garmin system just is a different valve cap and you don't have to take the wheel apart to change batteries. You DO have to have a metal valve stems though so you should install them when you next change tires if you are getting the Garmin System.
..Tom
That's the first I've heard that - does it just make the signal stronger or is it literally a gotta have?
I cringe at the price but at the same time with all the damned construction around here there's junk laying all over. Picked up 4 nails last year and two of those I got the mushies at a bad time. Forewarned is a good thing IMHO.
 

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There were some early issues with the system on the Garmin 590's that were fixed with software. (I don't know about the 390.) I have to say it is very stable and works extremely well on my 2015 DL1000. I have put over 76,000 km/ over 47,000 miles on mine in temperatures ranging from -10c (14°) to 32°c/90°f, in pouring rain, etc and they always worked. The batteries aren't too thrilled with temperatures much below freezing and it gives the odd low battery warning in that case but it is more of a minor annoyance rather than an issue as they still worked. ...

As has been mentioned the Garmin system just is a different valve cap and you don't have to take the wheel apart to change batteries. You DO have to have a metal valve stems though so you should install them when you next change tires if you are getting the Garmin System. I have not had any issues with leaking that could attributed to the valve caps. ...

..Tom
Tom, thanks for the info. When on the regular navigation screen, what happens in case you loose pressure. Will the ZUMO give an easily visible alert or only if you switch to the pressure monitor screen?

I think I asked before, you know what metal valve stems you are using? Are these possible these: CATALOG
 

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That's the first I've heard that - does it just make the signal stronger or is it literally a gotta have?
I cringe at the price but at the same time with all the damned construction around here there's junk laying all over. Picked up 4 nails last year and two of those I got the mushies at a bad time. Forewarned is a good thing IMHO.
Metal stems are recommended because rubber stems, especially if not replaced regularly, will fatigue and with the added sensor weight pulling on them can separate and that is not a good scene. Many are using rubber stems and report no problems.
 

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Metal stems are recommended because rubber stems, especially if not replaced regularly, will fatigue and with the added sensor weight pulling on them can separate and that is not a good scene. Many are using rubber stems and report no problems.
I just went a looked and in fact the installation instructions specify metal stems.
I'm guessing it's uses as an antenna but your surmise is likely accurate too since I know some people who put those stupid LED valve caps on and in fact they did cause some trouble.
 
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