StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
940 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I got stuck in the snow two weeks back and had to use sticks and my hands to dig the bike out enough to move forward. One of these would have been awfully handy and wondered if anyone carries one or something similar?

Glock Spade :: Aerostich/RiderWearHouse Motorcycle Jackets, Suits, Clothing, & Gear

Space is at a premium on a bike, of course, and I really don't have a lot of room for anything extra as it is. However, it folds down to a relatively small compact size and the utility of it is versatile. Yes, I get off-road on occasion and plan to do more of it, although nothing extreme by any standard. Basic fire road stuff with typical tent camping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
i don't, but i would say look at a local arm surplus store. you can get a small folding spade for pretty cheap ( i have seen them locally for around 10 dollars ) like this guy:



you could easily run a strap through the handle and hang it off the grab bar on the non exhaust side, or off the tool tube, or off the front, or top of a top case, front or back of a side case.. well you get the picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I carry a small spade, but I only use it for burying poo. The technique I used on my 650GS for getting unstuck in deep mud doesn't require a shovel. If I was high centered/buried wheels in mud, sand, or snow, I would lay the bike on it's side, fill in the holes, then pick the bike back up and ride away. YMMV.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,516 Posts
That is a pretty cool 'spade'.
$49 is a bit steep for me, though...

When primitive camping on the bike, I bring a shovel with, but it's an inexpensive one from Wally World, found it in the camping section for something around $10-15.




.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
I carry a small spade, but I only use it for burying poo. The technique I used on my 650GS for getting unstuck in deep mud doesn't require a shovel. If I was high centered/buried wheels in mud, sand, or snow, I would lay the bike on it's side, fill in the holes, then pick the bike back up and ride away. YMMV.
dude! that is so simple it's elegant and makes me feel stupid for never having thought of it.. reminds me of that joke:

During a visit to the mental hospital, I asked the Director 'How do you determine whether or not a patient should be admitted to the hospital.'

'Well,' said the Director, 'We fill up a bathtub, and then we give a teaspoon, a teacup and a bucket to the patient and ask him to empty the bathtub.'

'Oh, I understand,' I said. 'A normal person would use the bucket because it's bigger than the spoon or the teacup.'


'No.' Said the Director, 'A normal person would pull the drain plug.

Well... Would you prefer a bed near the window?'
:green_lol::headbang::green_lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
940 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Alternative approaches when getting stuck

I carry a small spade, but I only use it for burying poo. The technique I used on my 650GS for getting unstuck in deep mud doesn't require a shovel. If I was high centered/buried wheels in mud, sand, or snow, I would lay the bike on it's side, fill in the holes, then pick the bike back up and ride away. YMMV.
When I got stuck in the snow, I found it was actually easier to rock the bike side to side to push the snow away from the skid plate. I was riding through some deep ruts created by a 4wd that had passed through earlier. The snow was packed hard, so the bike started to high-center on the sides of the ruts, lifting weight off the back tire. By rocking side-to-side it made the ruts wider and allowed the bike to sit back down with full weight on the rear tire (my Shinko 705's had enough traction to then slowly move me forward).

With that Glock spade, it's no more functional than a $10 model purchased at a military surplus store, and compacts to about the same size, but I think the advantage is it's much lighter than an all-steel model. At least that's my understanding of that model's selling points.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
858 Posts
but I think the advantage is it's much lighter than an all-steel model. At least that's my understanding of that model's selling points.
so 2 pounds instead of 3 pounds? :fineprint:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
I have this small Gerber shovel for backpacking; it'll go on the bike when I start camping with it. It folds and collapses to a compact package, and weighs only about 1 3/4 pounds. It's very sturdy, costs about $20, and is sufficient for small digging jobs.

This has been one of the best camping items I've ever purchased.

GerberGear > Product Details > Gorge Folding Shovel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,279 Posts
so 2 pounds instead of 3 pounds? :fineprint:
Seems like chump change, but a pound here and there adds up really fast if you have to carry stuff on your back. I try to buy gear that works equally well in a pannier or a backpack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
i don't, but i would say look at a local arm surplus store. you can get a small folding spade for pretty cheap ( i have seen them locally for around 10 dollars ) like this guy:



you could easily run a strap through the handle and hang it off the grab bar on the non exhaust side, or off the tool tube, or off the front, or top of a top case, front or back of a side case.. well you get the picture.
I picked up on of these at a local camping store for $20, it lives in one of my panniers. They really do fold up pretty small.
 

·
$tromtrooper
Joined
·
2,378 Posts
Be careful. These things could be illegal in Australia and Canada, and the situation may vary from state to state in the U.S., especially with regard to carrying a concealed shovel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
940 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I use a sharpshooter/tilespade when I delineate wetlands to determine soil conditions, one bungee betwen the subframe and pillon peg hold the sharpshooter in place very well, my Sandvik brush axe rides in a bungee that is coiled around my Carribou rack
That bad boy would be damned inconvenient to have strapped to the bike in the event of a crash.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,199 Posts
I have several USGI folding e-tools. We have one in each car as they will easily break up ice, cut down a tree, or chop off a BG's hand:yesnod:. Currently a spare is on my bicycle as I've been digging ramps for my son.

Get the real USGI version used on eBay. There is a similar looking camping shovel, usually painted green, that is not nearly as strong.



A friend of mine used to carry a gardening spade on his bike: light, small, and a lot better than your hands.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,613 Posts
small shovel

This summer on my ride tthroug Newfoundland I carried a small plastic shovel, actualy a garden trowel just in case I needed to dig a whole to have a crap.
Ha ha there is no dirt there ..... they call it "the rock" for a good reason.
 

·
Living the Stereotype
Joined
·
11,544 Posts
any other shovel would be inconvenient/impractical for my use
Do you carry a snowshovel in the winter, or since you've gone to the darkside you have just affixed a plow?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,313 Posts
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top