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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking of replacing the wheel bearings in my Super Tenere this spring when I do my next tire change. I've heard that some guys have sourced their bearings directly from a bearing supplier, rather than the OEM parts (for the obvious reason od the potential cost savings of buying bearings without the OEM markup).

Has anyone ever done this? Can you recommend a particular online bearing supply business that you dealt with that carries the more reputable brands like Koyo or NTN? I'm not interested in things like All Balls bearings.
 

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I have, but it isn't all that easy. We have place in Houston that has bearings, and I mean LOTS of them in stock. Houston Bearing & Supply. Used to have a really good online chart. There are places like this in most metropolitan areas.

But don't go there and ask for bearings for your Super Tenere! They operate by OD/ID/width and then there is a LOT of choices in the range you need. Such as load/speed factors, sealed or not, etc.

If you have the information on size from someone that has already been through it, that is wonderful. You will probably be able to buy better bearings than came in your bike. Don't worry too much about brand. They can answer questions about quality if you ask them.

If you have no idea what sizes are, it may not be worth the time. You can take the bearings to the supplier, they are good at measuring them. But that is some time and work involved. Ordering replacements from a dealer might not be all that bad if time is considered.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Realshelby. I have what I think are the actual sizes (example: 22x50x14), and also various manufacturers' sizes like 60/22 2RS. Trouble is that it came from the 'net, and I'm not sure how accurate it is. I didn't know about the load ratings; I figured a bearing with the right measurement and manufacturers' number would be correct, but didn't know that there might be differences in load ratings within that category.
 

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RC, look up "Bearing Headquarters" and check if there is one there is one in your area.
The bearings in your bike will have international numbers on them, and BH can use these numbers for replacement.

2 summers ago I had a rider friend come visit me in St Louis from New York. I let him use my garage for maintenance while he was here, and he had me check his bike out.
His front wheel bearings were loose. I took off the front wheel and removed a front wheel bearing from the rim hub. 1st call was to a CarQuest auto parts store I deal with as a commercial account. I gave them the bearing numbers, they had 2 in stock and the rest is history.

Many of these wheel beaings come oem with one side sealed the other side open with the bearing seal facing out. When I replace wheel bearings I locate double-sealed bearings. Ive used NTN, Bower BCA, New Departure Hyatt, Timken, and FAG bearings depending on who has what.
 

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I'm thinking of replacing the wheel bearings in my Super Tenere this spring when I do my next tire change. I've heard that some guys have sourced their bearings directly from a bearing supplier, rather than the OEM parts (for the obvious reason od the potential cost savings of buying bearings without the OEM markup).

Has anyone ever done this? Can you recommend a particular online bearing supply business that you dealt with that carries the more reputable brands like Koyo or NTN? I'm not interested in things like All Balls bearings.
I have a set of new OEM S10 bearings and seals my buddy at the dealer gave me when I "thought" my S10 needed wheel bearings. They are double sealed and I could give you the bearing numbers to cross reference if it helps. Korean made if I remember correctly. For my Strom I bought NTN bearings locally that were double sealed and seemed to hold up well.

But, I have a question that has been checked on another bike and sort of double asked on the YST forum. On my old Strom, if you picked up a wheel by the inner bearing races and spun the wheel, the bearings would turn very smoothly. When I did this with my S10 wheel, the bearings felt tight and the inner races would spin on my fingers instead of staying stationary. I found out by asking around at YST, that the S10 bearings feel tight until the inner races are pushed against the collar (if this makes sense). If I use my thumbs and push inward on both bearing inner races to keep them from rotating and roll the wheel on a floor, they feel smooth (this is not easy to do by the way). I am not sure if this is what Yamaha intended or if the collar may be too long or the wheel machined wrong where the bearing OD sits. Another S10 wheel seemed the same as mine.

I went so far as pulling my calipers and mounting the wheel with the original bearings, spun the wheel and I think they are good. It makes it hard for me to judge the bearing wear though. I discovered this at 18,000 miles and it seems the same at 24,000 miles. I tossed the new bearings in the spare parts box and am running the old ones for now.

Your thoughts RCnNC?:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have a set of new OEM S10 bearings and seals my buddy at the dealer gave me when I "thought" my S10 needed wheel bearings. They are double sealed and I could give you the bearing numbers to cross reference if it helps. Korean made if I remember correctly. For my Strom I bought NTN bearings locally that were double sealed and seemed to hold up well.

But, I have a question that has been checked on another bike and sort of double asked on the YST forum. On my old Strom, if you picked up a wheel by the inner bearing races and spun the wheel, the bearings would turn very smoothly. When I did this with my S10 wheel, the bearings felt tight and the inner races would spin on my fingers instead of staying stationary. I found out by asking around at YST, that the S10 bearings feel tight until the inner races are pushed against the collar (if this makes sense). If I use my thumbs and push inward on both bearing inner races to keep them from rotating and roll the wheel on a floor, they feel smooth (this is not easy to do by the way). I am not sure if this is what Yamaha intended or if the collar may be too long or the wheel machined wrong where the bearing OD sits. Another S10 wheel seemed the same as mine.

I went so far as pulling my calipers and mounting the wheel with the original bearings, spun the wheel and I think they are good. It makes it hard for me to judge the bearing wear though. I discovered this at 18,000 miles and it seems the same at 24,000 miles. I tossed the new bearings in the spare parts box and am running the old ones for now.

Your thoughts RCnNC?:confused:
I'll be honest, I don't think I've ever tried to turn the bearings with my fingers. When I check the bearings, I just pull the wheel from side to side to see if there's any play in it. I have taken the wheels off to change the tires, and when I do, I balance the wheels in one of those Marc Parnes balancers. Those have cones that fit inside the bearings to support the tire while it's being balanced. The balancer looks like this:



The whole axle, cones, and wheel rotate as a unit when the wheel is spinning; the unit sits on those bearings at each end of the axle, and it rotates on those bearings. The cones don't exert any inward pressure on the bearings the way a tightened axle on the bike would. My guess is that the inner races aren't moving while the wheel is being balanced, or else the axle of the balancer wouldn't be rotating on those bearings. So I'd guess if I tried to spin the inner races by hand, I'd probably experience the same tightness you did. If they weren't tight, then the wheel would rotate around the wheel bearings when it was on the stand, and the whole unit wouldn't be rotating on the axle of the balancing unit. Hopefully, that makes sense.....

If you have that set of OEM bearings, it would be awesome if you could read the numbers off them (or even take photos of them), so I can see if the numbers match up with what's available from bearing supply houses. There should be three different sizes of bearings in the set. The front bearings and the rear wheel non-drive side should measure 22x44x12. The rear wheel drive side should measure 22x50x14, and the bearing in the clutch hub should measure 25x47x12. I believe the front bearings and the rear wheel non drive side bearing should have a number something like 60/22 2RS, the rear wheel drive side should be something like 62/22 2RS, and the clutch hub should be something like 6005RD or 6005 2RS.

Thanks, I really appreciate the help!
 

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I only have the fronts. My buddy ordered them from Yamaha, he is the Service Manager. They were covered by my YES warranty but I chose to wait for now to install. I am listing part numbers so you can verify they were ordered correctly.

Seals PN 93106-28043 (M180124A).

Bearing PN 93306-07208 (K180306A). They are stamped KBC 6004DK on seal area. On outer race smaller numbers F845006. Korea.

P.S. - Getting old crappy eyes disclaimer 6004DK could be 80040K. Pretty sure I have it correct though and they are double sealed. If you cross them to Japanese bearings I would like those numbers please.
 

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RCinNC - I have an extensive maintenance/parts list for the S10 from YST, but as luck would have it the bearings were not listed. Good resource though for filters and such. I just buy Yamaha stuff though and the OEM bearings were like $20 each list. If you have YES you might ask your dealer for freebies. They are a bitch to get them out, harder than a Strom of course. I did a buddy's but not mine, had a hard time moving the collar over to drive the first side out. A blind collet-type puller would be much better.
 

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Seals PN 93106-28043 (M180124A).

Bearing PN 93306-07208 (K180306A). They are stamped KBC 6004DK on seal area. On outer race smaller numbers F845006. Korea.

P.S. - Getting old crappy eyes disclaimer 6004DK could be 80040K. Pretty sure I have it correct though and they are double sealed. If you cross them to Japanese bearings I would like those numbers please.
I would be sure that the number is 6004DK.

All the wheel bearings that I have ever used are inscribed with the bearing number (not the part#) on both sides of the outer race so that you can remove the seal to examine the wheel for the bearing number before removing them. Note that the numbers are very small.

The two letters are also indicative (I vaguely remember DS as meaning double sealed, which is what you want. So the D means double sealed and the K is some other indication of the construction or use of that bearing.

With those four numbers you can walk into any bearing supplier and order them, not forgetting to add that you would prefer double sealed.

Japanese manufactured bearings have always had a better reputation. Also more than a few times SKF has been recommended to me by people whose opinions I respect.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I only have the fronts. My buddy ordered them from Yamaha, he is the Service Manager. They were covered by my YES warranty but I chose to wait for now to install. I am listing part numbers so you can verify they were ordered correctly.

Seals PN 93106-28043 (M180124A).

Bearing PN 93306-07208 (K180306A). They are stamped KBC 6004DK on seal area. On outer race smaller numbers F845006. Korea.

P.S. - Getting old crappy eyes disclaimer 6004DK could be 80040K. Pretty sure I have it correct though and they are double sealed. If you cross them to Japanese bearings I would like those numbers please.
Thanks, STCorndog, I appreciate it. I've seen postings on forums that say that the bearing for the front is a 6004DK, and other postings saying it's a 60/22DG and a 60/22 2RS. I thought the outer race was supposed to be marked with the actual bearing number, but the F845006 number is one I haven't seen anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
RCinNC - I have an extensive maintenance/parts list for the S10 from YST, but as luck would have it the bearings were not listed. Good resource though for filters and such. I just buy Yamaha stuff though and the OEM bearings were like $20 each list. If you have YES you might ask your dealer for freebies. They are a bitch to get them out, harder than a Strom of course. I did a buddy's but not mine, had a hard time moving the collar over to drive the first side out. A blind collet-type puller would be much better.
Yep, I have a list like that too, I keep it on my phone. I actually had to use it in Colorado when I had to buy a filter for the Yamaha in an O'Reilly Auto Parts. That was a big reason I wanted to pin down the bearing sizes: if I'm ever touring and I destroy a bearing, I'd like to be able to go to a NAPA or a bearing store and get a new one, without having to wait for a week for a Yamaha shop to order me one. I priced the OEM bearings at Rocky Mountain ATV (who always have good prices on stuff), and even there, a full set of bearings will cost $133.00. At my local shop, you could probably add at least 20% on top of that. Because I have the soul of a KLR650 owner, I'm always looking to save a buck. I guess if I can't pin down the the exact bearings I need from a bearing supplier, I'll break down and buy OEM.

I bought a tool for pulling bearings from Pit Posse. You actually drive them out from the opposite side of the wheel. Looks pretty slick, but I haven't used it yet.
 

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Bearings usually have a part no. stamped on them I'd quote that number. I buy from my local bearing shops and get Koyo, NTN, etc. Not Chinese!

I used to do the same for my model boat racing engines and they'd spin out to 20,000rpm (not so good when they hydraulic and stop dead! :( )
 

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RC, the problem I had with the Parnes balancer was that after enough times balancing tires, the shaft wasnt exactly straight. I measured it with one of my dial indicator and V-block sets. He sent me another shaft, but by that time I had bought a No-Mar balancing stand. My Parnes was just 2 small cones with thumbscrews, a straight shaft, and 2 bearing saddles. Your Parnes balancer is similar to my No-Mar in that there are 2 small bearings per side. Here is the No-Mar:
https://www.nomartirechanger.com/category_s/38.htm
I have the No-Mar Motorcycle Stand, straight shaft, small and large diameter metal bearing cones, Acme threaded shaft and threaded cones, and other accessories for it. It works on single-side swingarm rims like BMW and Triumphs, you name it. Mine is of the older type, the later designs are a bit different, but the principle is the same. I havent had one bike that my balancer woudnt fit.
I get my balancing weights from industrial supplier Crest Industries. Most of mine are black steel, and I have a few older weights in natural grey lead. The black weights are in 2 oz adhesive segmented strips, 1/4 oz per segment. A full box is 80 strips 10lbs worth. I seldom use the grey any more, I purchased my box of grey weights back in '04. The new
The weights are also available in chrome. The newer weights are a tad longer, but narrower and thinner, much less noticeable.
 

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I made a custom wheel balancer using information from teh web. Back then balancing my ST1300 tires seemed to make a lot of snse. I used extremely high quality bearings, much higher spec than wheel bearings.

What I found was teh the wheel would wind up turning on the wheel bearings anyway making the whiz bang high zoot balancer bearings just seem silly.

About buying aftermarket bearings. Yep done it for decades. Most stock berings are seal on one side (the outside). Buy double sealed bearing (sealed on both sides). Pennies more and they last much longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So far, the most difficult thing about sourcing a non OEM bearing has been trying to figure out what bearings I need without actually buying a set of OEM bearings so I could read the numbers/measure the bearings. So far, I haven't found anyone on any of the forums I'm on who has actually bought non-OEM bearings for his S10 and was able to say what the numbers were. I don't want to pull the old ones and then try sourcing the bearings, in case there's a big delay in acquiring one of them.

I like the Marc Parnes balancer. It's smooth as glass, and the tire definitely rotates on the balancer axle and not the wheel bearings.
 

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"I don't want to pull the old ones and then try sourcing the bearings, in case there's a big delay in acquiring one of them."
Most times, since the single-side seal is on the outside the bearing number is on the seal itself, not the bearing outer race. Yes, it requires pulling the wheel and outer dist seal, but you dont have to remove the bearing from the rim to read the number
 

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edited to what I wanted................I bought a tool for pulling bearings from Pit Posse. You actually drive them out from the opposite side of the wheel. Looks pretty slick, but I haven't used it yet.
Got a number or description of said tool. I borrowed a collet style puller to do my friends bike and the collar was so tight against the inner races, the tool would not grab correctly. The tight collar was a bitch to move sideways so I could use my special "hammering-bearings-out" tool (blunt drift). Once 1 bearing was out side 2 was cake. Next time I may heat hub with heat gun.

On bearing install, I froze bearings and used old socket to drive in against the outer race. I drove them home and my buddies wheel felt tight like mine does. I am still not sure my Tenere is clearanced correctly between the inner collar length and the machined bearing sockets in the hubs. Very tempted to machine collar a small bit shorter....but then I think Yamaha might be smarter than I.:confused:
 

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ST, a friend of mine did that collar machining bit on his Bandit1200 rear wheel bearing set...and the results werent pretty.
Maybe he went to far, dunno.Ive never had to machine one down for the correct bearing fit.
I have several slide hammer/collet-type bearing puller sets from Snap-on and MAC...none work well removing motorcycle axle bearings. So, like you I use a large drift and hammer. A brass drift and no spacer damage yet.
 
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