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Discussion Starter #1
The other day while out for a cold ride, I turned on my Auxilary lights followed by the Heater Grips. As soon as I turned on the grips, the fuse blew turning off the grips, my Aux lights AND my headlights. The fuse that blew was a 30 amp fuse (seems awfully high an amperage) that was from the battery which went into a relay.. The relay went into an Eastern Beaver 3 junction fuse box. In the fusebox was a 20 amp fuse for the headlight, a 10 amp fuse for the Aux lights and a 5 amp fuse for the heated Oxford grips. My question is, why didn't the Eastern Beaver 5 amp fuse for the Grips blow. Why did the 30 amp fuse blow which also melted the wiring? And third, isn't 30 amps too high for a fuse which I believe would have blown if it was a lower amperage than burning out the wiring.

This wee Strom was purchased used with the above items already pre-installed.

On a side note, I replaced the handlebar (fell hard and bent it), it was hard to reinstall the Oxford grips so I had to lightly pound it in. Prior to that, everything worked fine. Could I have crossed a wire in the Oxford when I pounded it in?
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To me that looks more like it got hot from a poor connection and high load rather than a dead short.

But it could also be the connection was a hot spot because the fuse was too big & the connection was poor,

Normally with a short the top of the fuse should be the hottest part not inside the plug where it is in this case.

If you know the size of the wire you can work out if the 30a fuse was to big, the fuse is sized to protect the wires and you should be able to find a table online for wire sizes and fuses.

I have seen it many times where people do things like upgrade their headlight globes but the system can't handle the load, they most often melt the fuse at holder.
 

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I'm with RR on this. When I have an issue the first thing I do is try and remember what I did last. Hate to say that it is usually me, BUT-----------
 

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Discussion Starter #5
To me that looks more like it got hot from a poor connection and high load rather than a dead short.

But it could also be the connection was a hot spot because the fuse was too big & the connection was poor,

Normally with a short the top of the fuse should be the hottest part not inside the plug where it is in this case.

If you know the size of the wire you can work out if the 30a fuse was to big, the fuse is sized to protect the wires and you should be able to find a table online for wire sizes and fuses.

I have seen it many times where people do things like upgrade their headlight globes but the system can't handle the load, they most often melt the fuse at holder.
That sounds like what happened. The fuse holder was fried and the fuse did not blow.
I looked it up, a 30 amp fuse should have at least a 10 gauge wire. The wiring for the 30 amp fuse was a 14 gauge, two sizes smaller. No wonder why the fuse holder melted.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Regardless, the Oxford Grips are now non-functional. The "on/off" light comes on, but it cannot be adjusted nor is there any heat to the grips.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm with RR on this. When I have an issue the first thing I do is try and remember what I did last. Hate to say that it is usually me, BUT-----------
That's the thing, I purchased the bike with this setup. I've used both the the grips and aux lights together in the past, but this time, it fried the fuse. I noticed the aux light switch light go off as well as the grip lights on the control panel, followed by smoke coming from underneath my seat. Pulled off the seat to a cloud of smoke and saw the melted fuse assembly. My riding buddy said my headlights were also out. I traced everything back to the Eastern Beaver fuse box. All 3 fuses were fine and the box was fine. Just the main fuse off the battery was melted as you can see from the photo
 

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Main fuse melted, load fuses fine? gotta trace wires. Something between the battery and the fuse block protected by that 30 amp fuse has gone to ground or broken and creates the heat by trying to get the current through too few wires. Could have been a bend near the 30 amp fuse holder that caused the problem,
My '73 Honda 500/4 used to blow the 30 amp main fuse going to the headlight at inconvenient times. I found a bend in the wire loom leading to the headlight had broken the feed wire and it was drawing too much current over only a few strands of wire.
Try taking power individually from the battery to the various items, grips, lights, etc and see if they function correctly.
Don't hard wire it just get a length of wire with clips on the end for test purposes.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm with RR on this. When I have an issue the first thing I do is try and remember what I did last. Hate to say that it is usually me, BUT-----------
That's the thing, I purchased the bike with this setup. I've used both the the grips and aux lights together in the past, but this time, it fried the fuse. I noticed the aux light switch light go off as well as the grip lights on the control panel, followed by smoke coming from underneath my seat. Pulled off the seat to a cloud of smoke and saw the melted fuse assembly. My riding buddy said my headlights were also out. I traced everything back to the Eastern Beaver fuse box. All 3 fuses were fine and the box was fine. Just the main fuse off the battery was melted as you can see from the photo
 

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I thought about this thread several times over the last few days considering what Rolex and Eagleeye had said. I think my use of direct short was incorrect. Direct short usually means essentially no resistance between positive and negative de to wires touching, crossing, etc.

Taking in all that has been said about the history and the condition of the grip, It seems more likely that there was a short between the heating elements of the grip. The grip has loops of resistance wire. The longer the loop the more resistance, and less heating. The shorter the loop, the less resistance, and more heating. I suspect the pounding on the end of the grip resulted in a short between these loops, reducing resistance, but not to zero. That allowed the grip to heat itself to the point of destruction without blowing the fuse.

When you repair the circuit, I suggest different smaller fuses on each leg properly sized for each individual load.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the analysesl After reviewing all that was done when I replaced the handlebar, the pounding on the grip is what probably caused the short plus the incorrect amperage of the fuse (30 amps) was too high for the wire and the circuit. I had no idea what size the fuse was until the circuit melted the wiring harness. Whoever installed it, I'm not the original owner, put in a fuse with too high an amperage to the wires and the circuit thereby burning up the wiring assembly. I have it rewired with a 20 amp fuse and 12 gauge wiring assembly to avoid such a thing happening in the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
The actual fuse is 10 amps. The 20 amp fuse from the battery is for the Eastern Beaver fuse box which has 3 fuses. It was that fuse that was 30 amps and the wiring was 14 gauge (too small for the wiring). It was that fuse and holder that burned out.

The fuse from the battery is now 20 amps, wiring is 12 gauge, fuses for the Eastern Beaver as follows:
-Headlight...20 amps
-Heated grips...10amps
-Auxillary lights...5 amps

Question is, is the 20amp fuse the correct amperage?
 

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The actual fuse is 10 amps. The 20 amp fuse from the battery is for the Eastern Beaver fuse box which has 3 fuses. It was that fuse that was 30 amps and the wiring was 14 gauge (too small for the wiring). It was that fuse and holder that burned out.

The fuse from the battery is now 20 amps, wiring is 12 gauge, fuses for the Eastern Beaver as follows:
-Headlight...20 amps
-Heated grips...10amps
-Auxillary lights...5 amps

Question is, is the 20amp fuse the correct amperage?
I think the fuse from the battery to the EB fusebox should be 30 amps. I have 12 gauge wire from battery to my aux fusebox with a 30 amp fuse. I have individual high and low beam relays powered from the aux fusebox with 16 gauge wire and 14 gauge wire to the headlights and will put 15 amp fuses for each (as Suzuki did originally, although without relays). I also have the heated glove/socks harness connected to the aux fusebox. If I add driving lights I can see a simultaneous load on the aux fusebox of more than 20 amps.

Mind you, I am NOT an electrickery guy by ANY stretch of the imagination and can happily be corrected.

Cheers,
Glenn
 

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I had a set of oxford grips do something similar. The wires where they attach to the resistance wire are soldered with high temp solder, but over time, they just fatigued at the connection and the hot separated, then shorted as it rubbed down through the dielectric.
 
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