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Discussion Starter #1
This morning I did what I liked the least on my DR650 too - mounted the rear wheel on my Wee (new Battlewing arrived :)).

I dunno. Possibly (probably) I'm a newb at this stuff, but mounting the rear wheel is one of more frustrating things for me. There are just so many things that can go wrong. Keep the spacers on both sides in place, make sure that the disc goes into the caliper but does not push it out of it's place (notch), keep a look at the adjuster screws so they don't fall out while you are doing all this, and handle a grease-covered axle while holding everything else in place, a wheel up in the air; hope nothing falls out of place. It is all just very awkward.

Feel incredibly lucky once the axle is all the way through.

I used a brick to hold the rear wheel off the ground while I was aligning it all so that helped. But - are there any tricks for making this a bit less PITA? Granted, I am not doing this very often but still... I could be missing some tips that make life easier...
 

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keep a look at the adjuster screws so they don't fall out while you are doing all this
I temporarily tape the adjuster ends and screws onto the end of the swingarm with masking tape so they don't fall out from the movement occuring when attempting to slide the axle in. It's a bitch if you start the axle through when it is not properly aligned through the internal hole in the adjusters(gets jammed).

The rest of what I do may or may not be as helpful.

To get all of the spacers and rotor lined up, I try to find something to prop under the rear wheel so it will raise up enough to allow everything to perilously stay in postion until the final step.

In the final step, I start the axle through on the left side, then get into a seated position behind the bike and remove the prop while sliding my right hand and arm into the postion previously held by the prop in kind of a weightlifter bicep curl position. This allows me to make fine adjustments to the wheel pulling up or down and back at the same time while attempting to work the axle through with left hand.

This method may not work for everybody, because, as you have already mentioned, if can require repeated attempts and be exhausting because the spacers can fall out while trying to work the axle through.
 

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It's easiest with a helper. PITA otherwise.
 

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I haven't done it on my V Strom yet, but on the KLR I used a lever that I could press with my foot to adjust the vertical position of the wheel while manouvering it into position. I also removed the caliper to ease things along. Those two things made wheel replacement quick and painless.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Put the axle through from the brake side. Everything lines up easier. I've been doing this for many tire changes.
Interesting... then you leave it like that? I guess there is nothing wrong with that, hmmm...

Well, at least I know I am not the only one feeling like I got two left hands when doing this. :)

I like the idea of the lever under the wheel...
 

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As one poster has already mentioned, keep the spacers in their original locations, but flip the axle to start in on the right side. This way you can hang a bunch of the stuff that is giving you trouble off of it, then push it the rest of the way through when you have everything lined up. The nut will now live on the left side of your bike.

Also, using a small wooden wedge, slid under the rear wheel, that will allow you to raise the tire and wheel to the proper height is a good second pair of hands.

Here's a pic of the axle.


Here is a pic of wooden wedges on a front tire. Do the same for the rear.
 

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You think the rear wheel sucks, just wait until you have to do the front ABS. Even with 4 hands that was a PITA.
 
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HAH! Try doing the rear wheel with just your left hand (while holding an ice cold beer in your right hand). Now THAT will make it a challenge:cheers2:
While smoking to boot...keeping one eye shut so as not to get any ashes in while twisting head...

BTD.
 

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Sit on my butt on the brake side of the bike with my feet out in front of me. Put the wheels on my feet and flex my toes up and down to get the wheel in place and pop the axle through.

Takes about 5 minutes altogether.

Of course on the Guzzi I just set the wheel up there and screw on 4 lug nuts...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sit on my butt on the brake side of the bike with my feet out in front of me. Put the wheels on my feet and flex my toes up and down to get the wheel in place and pop the axle through.

Takes about 5 minutes altogether.

Of course on the Guzzi I just set the wheel up there and screw on 4 lug nuts...
Now that is an awesome tip!! Thanks!

Sounds like axle from the brake side is the way to go...
 

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I read this thread one day too late. I did this exact thing last night, what a PITA! :banghead:. I finally had my son feed the axel through while I held everything in place. Took 2 minutes with the extra set of hands...after 15 minutes of bad words!

I like the axel reversal idea, gonna try that next time.

Thanks.
 
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