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I bought a new 2015 DL650A and it is about ready for the 600 mile service. I have the service manual and tools necessary to do the job. Below is what I see needs to be done:


  • Oil/filter change and chain adjustment are no brainers.
  • Clutch and throttle play adjustment is described pretty well in the manual.
  • Tightening exhaust and muffler bolts seems pretty straight forward.
  • inspect brakes
  • When it says 'inspect steering', what am I looking for?
  • I am fuzzy on is where all of the chassis bolts will be located for tightening and what their torque spec will be.
So unless I am missing something it all seems doable.
Any insight would be helpful.
Thanks.
 

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Wrenching on a new bike sounds super scary to me. Unless you are a certified motorcycle engineer with lots of equipment, I don't see anything good coming out of "tinkering" with the core functioning components of a motorcycle. Farkling is one thing.. But all the other stuff I leave to the professionals. But that's just me..
 

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Generally the 1st service is an oil and filter change and check all the fasteners you see. Not everything is always perfect out of the box and after dealer set up.
The steering is checking for looseness of the bearings, or binding. With the bike on the center stand grab the forks and try to rock them for and aft., it shouldn't have any play. Turn the handle bars and the wheel should fall gently to the right and left, no notchy feel as it moves through the center point of travel.
Having a receipt for the oil and filter should suffice as proof of the task.
I've had dealers over tighten the steering head bearings before and screw with the clutch adjustment when I felt it was perfect.

As for dealer set up, when I rode off the lot with my new BMW F800ST the warning light came on and told me the tires were low on pressure. I went around the block and got the "Oh, I guess we missed that", explanation. I didn't go back much after that.
 

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As for dealer set up, when I rode off the lot with my new BMW F800ST the warning light came on and told me the tires were low on pressure. I went around the block and got the "Oh, I guess we missed that", explanation. I didn't go back much after that.
Avoiding the dealer seems a very, very common theme here . . .
 

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Avoiding the dealer seems a very, very common theme here . . .
I think price and getting to know your bike are big factors for this. You basically are paying big money for an oil change and a visual inspection. If the dealers were in any way competitive more people would go to them.
 

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I bought a new 2015 DL650A and it is about ready for the 600 mile service. I have the service manual and tools necessary to do the job. Below is what I see needs to be done:


  • Oil/filter change and chain adjustment are no brainers.
  • Clutch and throttle play adjustment is described pretty well in the manual.
  • Tightening exhaust and muffler bolts seems pretty straight forward.
  • inspect brakes
  • When it says 'inspect steering', what am I looking for?
  • I am fuzzy on is where all of the chassis bolts will be located for tightening and what their torque spec will be.
So unless I am missing something it all seems doable.
Any insight would be helpful.
Thanks.

There are exceptions, but the majority of "first service" appointments at a dealer will get nothing beyond an oil change and a quick glance over the bike. I would be willing to bet that very few times is a torque wrench used on a first service. Change the oil, start it up, check for leaks and any obvious problems, ride it back up front for the service writer to take over.

I know this seems harsh on dealers. I will say my BMW dealer did seam to inspect the bike on delivery and first service, but they HAVE to hook it to the computer anyway so that will show if they don't. But my last Suzuki had air pressure below 20 lbs in both tires on delivery. Free 600 mile checkup was offered. Do you think I took it back for that?

Learning to maintain your motorcycle is part of riding it. Most airplane pilots don't do much work to their airplane, but you can bet they do careful inspections of it regularly. Because their ass is on the line. So is yours on that bike, so learn how to maintain it and get a feel for working on it. If you don't know these things, it is difficult to learn how the bike operates and makes it harder to recognize a problem that needs immediate attention. I like to carefully go over my bikes when I wash them. You are touching most of the bike anyway, get into a habit of looking for fasteners that don't look right, oil seeps, wires out of place, and so on. That's my opinion, and so far has served me well.
 

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Wrenching on a new bike sounds super scary to me. Unless you are a certified motorcycle engineer with lots of equipment, I don't see anything good coming out of "tinkering" with the core functioning components of a motorcycle. Farkling is one thing.. But all the other stuff I leave to the professionals. But that's just me..
You are joking right, are you one of those who only ride their bikes and knows nothing about how to maintain/repair or could care less? :confused: I am not a certified motorcycle mechanic, sure glad I haven't caused harm to myself and others by doing all of my own maintenance and repairs to the many bikes I have owned. If I sound like a smart ass....so be it, your comment was beyond ridiculous to me.
 

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I see no reason to go to the dealer unless there is a problem with the bike that is covered under warrantee.

I am in the same situation as you, I just bought the bike Saturday, 2015 650 XT, and at the moment have 350 miles on it, should be close to 600 by the end of the weekend. I figure I can swing by the dealer and pick up a filter and some oil and do it myself.

I am not that far from you either, I am in Milton.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone. I guess I will do it myself.
As for the chassis bolts, do I need to worry about specific torque settings or just make sure everything is snugged up?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I see no reason to go to the dealer unless there is a problem with the bike that is covered under warrantee.

I am in the same situation as you, I just bought the bike Saturday, 2015 650 XT, and at the moment have 350 miles on it, should be close to 600 by the end of the weekend. I figure I can swing by the dealer and pick up a filter and some oil and do it myself.

I am not that far from you either, I am in Milton.
Where did you buy your bike? I got mine in Laconia at HK Sports.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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If you want to play with a torque wrench, make sure it is set to the correct value, is set to 0 when not in use if it is a click type and keep your head in the game. Don't blindly crank away as the thing may be set to the wrong value. Having it at 0 when in use will result in it never clicking. I like to compare it to another one to make sure its setting hasn't drifted. It would be very unusual for two to go out of calibration by the same amount. The values for a "7" marked bolt will work for your chassis bolts. It's also useful to have a caliper or bolt hole gauge to be sure of your shank measurements.

 

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My bike has been back to the dealer a total of once in 52K miles, for the stator recall. I do understand though that not everyone is mechanically inclined.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you want to play with a torque wrench, make sure it is set to the correct value, is set to 0 when not in use if it is a click type and keep your head in the game. Don't blindly crank away as the thing may be set to the wrong value. Having it at 0 when in use will result in it never clicking. I like to compare it to another one to make sure its setting hasn't drifted. It would be very unusual for two to go out of calibration by the same amount. The values for a "7" marked bolt will work for your chassis bolts. It's also useful to have a caliper or bolt hole gauge to be sure of your shank measurements.

Thanks for the chart! Is there any way to know the size of the bolt without taking it out and measuring it?
 

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My bike has been back to the dealer a total of once in 52K miles, for the stator recall. I do understand though that not everyone is mechanically inclined.
My overall view is that if you are gonna actually ride a motorcycle "some just own motorcycles", then you would be wise to learn a bit about the bikes you own and do a bit of easy wrenching yourself. :fineprint:
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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Thanks for the chart! Is there any way to know the size of the bolt without taking it out and measuring it?
If you've never had a bolt out before so it's size isn't already in your head, you may be able to find it in a parts list. 2015 Suzuki DL650A OEM Parts, MRCycles
Otherwise, take it out and check if it isn't going to cause anything to fall off. That will also help you identify bolt size by eye. If you see signs of thread locker on a bolt, leave it alone. You can't reliably tell a bolt size by the head size. The bike has 6mm and 8mm bolts with 10mm heads for example.

Here is a chart for chassis bolts. One danger is you may mis-identify a bolt name. Another is there are some questionable values in this chart as well as with other areas. The swingarm pivot nut and rear axle nut are stainless steel on stainless steel. SS likes to gall under pressure. Apply anti seize to the threads and reduce the torque to 80% of the published value to account for the lubrication effect. The rear sprocket nut torque is just plain wrong. It should read 50Nm or 36lb-ft, like a 10mm bolt should have as in the previous chart. Also, the side stand bracket bolts are in with thread locker. Leave them alone. And take out the two bolts that connect the fairing frame to the main frame one at a time and put them back in with medium strength tread locker. Some people like to use thread locker on the brake caliper mounting bolts too.

 

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And, GW to the rescue with the Torque chart.
"
your comment was beyond ridiculous to me."

Maybe not so, some folks hurt themselves if they get near a pair of pliers. If a body has trepidation with the mechanical challenge....off to the dealer.
Note, I didn't say what Big B said but I thought it.>:)
 

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I have always ridden bikes, driven cars also, since I was 16 years old and that was back in the 60's. In all that time I have never learnt how to fix/repair/service things. It seems somehow to not be in my make-up to comprehend mechanicals.

I can play guitar, I can splice ropes for the boat, I can think up ideas how to do stuff. But the motorised conveyances that I love seem to manage to keep the relationships to the platonic level. I am not allowed to fiddle with the internals in case I do damage to them with my clumsiness and ineptitude..:grin2:

I still call myself a "rider' though MrB. You can call me what you like.:wink2:

Coops.
 

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Buying a Suzuki shop manual is a great first investment, then update it to correct known issues which are identified in a post on the forum. -Search for manual errors.

It really is a pretty good resource.
 

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I have always ridden bikes, driven cars also, since I was 16 years old and that was back in the 60's. In all that time I have never learnt how to fix/repair/service things. It seems somehow to not be in my make-up to comprehend mechanicals.

I can play guitar, I can splice ropes for the boat, I can think up ideas how to do stuff. But the motorised conveyances that I love seem to manage to keep the relationships to the platonic level. I am not allowed to fiddle with the internals in case I do damage to them with my clumsiness and ineptitude..:grin2:

I still call myself a "rider' though MrB. You can call me what you like.:wink2:

Coops.
Sometimes it's better to recognize what you can't do; mechanics are full of horror stories of home repair jobs by guys whose reach exceeded their grasp. I can design and fix stuff, but the sound that a guitar would make while hitting me over the head would be better than any sound I could produce with my fingers....:grin2:
 
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