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Discussion Starter #1
What do you run your Shinko 804/805's at on a DL650?

I've put the rear at 40. I'm really surprised how well this tire behaves on pavement.
 

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I agree with the handling, at least in the dry. Better than the 705 in the twisties. Haven't had the chance to ride them to death so i can't vouch for mileage.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What about the front? I haven't installed the 804 yet due to life on my OEM TW left. I currently have the OEM TW running at 36.
 

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OK, I have to ask, why run the pressure so high? Recommended pressure is 33 psi front and 36 psi rear.
 

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A too low tire pressure generates heat (tire wear), while too high tire pressure quickly looses road grip. The trick is to find a happy medium. An on-road test, check tire pressure before going for a ride, stop and take pressure again. If memory serves (open to correction), the pressure should be within 5 - 7 psi of the cold pressure. Another rough indicator is to go for a ride, just a mile or two, get off and feel whether the tire feels hot or just warm. Change the pressure and do the same test again. Or you can follow suggested tire pressures as per the owners manual.
https://www.designcorse.com/blogs/news/front-rear-motorcycle-tire-pressure
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK, I have to ask, why run the pressure so high? Recommended pressure is 33 psi front and 36 psi rear.
Cold weather, less expansion due to lack of ambient heat, is one consideration. I'm leaving for work at 0-5 degrees lately.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
A too low tire pressure generates heat (tire wear), while too high tire pressure quickly looses road grip. The trick is to find a happy medium. An on-road test, check tire pressure before going for a ride, stop and take pressure again. If memory serves (open to correction), the pressure should be within 5 - 7 psi of the cold pressure. Another rough indicator is to go for a ride, just a mile or two, get off and feel whether the tire feels hot or just warm. Change the pressure and do the same test again. Or you can follow suggested tire pressures as per the owners manual.
https://www.designcorse.com/blogs/news/front-rear-motorcycle-tire-pressure
Thanks.

Keep in mind the manual states 42psi in the back when 2up and tripping with gear, so weight plays a factor which the default 36psi doesn't account for.
 

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I had the tire pressure monitors on my 800ST BMW. I didn't notice the pressure fluctuating as I traveled. i normally set the street tires at 36/42 cold and forgetaboutit.
That's riding just me or loaded with the chit for camping
 

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What about the front? I haven't installed the 804 yet due to life on my OEM TW left. I currently have the OEM TW running at 36.
I wouldn't run less than 40 if you care for longevity. I ran 32 in Mexico (roads there pretty eventful go from good to shit in no time) and it was finished at 4500. At 8k there were no double central knobs left couldn't make extra 100mi.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@;

The pressures in the manual would be for the stock OEM tires, not the Shinko's.
Good point! Shinko Canada's website doesn't offer any insight. Hence this thread.

I realize the question depends entirely on the riding conditions (pavement, sand, gravel, off road) and use case (1up, 2up, tripping, twisties vs prairie driving vs commuting). Looking for the happy medium.

38-40 in the rear and 34-36 in the front for my conditions appears to be it.

But your point is valid, what does Shinko recommend?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I wouldn't run less than 40 if you care for longevity. I ran 32 in Mexico (roads there pretty eventful go from good to shit in no time) and it was finished at 4500. At 8k there were no double central knobs left couldn't make extra 100mi.
Just saw this. Thanks and reinforces the 40psi argument. The tire seams to drive great at 40, and corners very well, on pavement anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The Shinko website lists a max PSI of 33 psi for the 150/70-17.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
I should always check the US site! The Canadian site has little to no info on it.

That's really low IMO! All the other specs are close to, or above, 40 psi. Why so low for this particular tire?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The 110/80-19 is also 33psi. A front and back tire both set to the same pressure? Doesn't make sense.

If I set it to 33, it'll wear out quick as mentioned above, and probably be a bit sloppy in the corners. I'm going to reach out to them.
 

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The 110/80-19 is also 33psi. A front and back tire both set to the same pressure? Doesn't make sense.

If I set it to 33, it'll wear out quick as mentioned above, and probably be a bit sloppy in the corners. I'm going to reach out to them.

Ran mine 36 front and 38 rear.....you'll be just fine. :wink2:
 
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I bought my bike used and it came with 805s on it with plenty of life left. I'm not crazy about them but they'll stay on for a while. I run 36-36 with just me on it and they handle well enough on the pavement and packed gravel. Plan on changing them to Avon Trailriders, my old standard, in the Fall.
 

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Okay guys and gals,

Seriously. DO NOT go around telling people to run pressures that are higher than the MAXIMUM that the manufacturer has stated. On my bike, the maximum pressure is 33psi both front and rear. The only time that they'll be run at 33psi is when I'm two up, fully loaded for a trip and they handle great. These are Bias ply tires, they don't need crazy high pressures to protect the sidewall. These are inexpensive tires, and you shouldn't be risking your safety just to squeeze a few more miles out of them. I've scraped a few people up off the pavement in my career thus far, and I don't care to scrape up anybody else on account of an over-inflated tire. Over inflating is going to decrease your contact patch and increase stopping distance.

I'm sorry for ranting at you all. Stay safe. XOXO.
 

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Agree with Medic's thoughts above. You gotta remember these are DOT bias-ply knobbies, not high-speed highway radial tires. That being said, they handle incredibly well in the twisties with very predictable traction characteristics. Obviously, they won't give you long miles on the street mounted on our 500-550# bikes. If you need something to give you better off-road performance and still behave like street tire to/from the trailhead, these are your choice! You could go with the Metzler Karoo 3's but at a much higher price point.

BTW, I'm on my 3rd set and I typically run 32-33 front and 32-35 rear. I do bump the pressures a couple lbs for long high-speed freeway runs, but that's almost never!
 
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