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I've used Suzuki oil filters for the past 65,000 mile but on my last order they substituted Emgo 56-8566 filters. They claim they are equivalent and they do look identical right down to the round, not flat, gasket. The Suzuki filter calls for 2 turns after contact; Emgo 2/3.
When I stopped at 2/3 turn the filter felt too loose so I went another half turn, still almost a whole turn less than Suzuki. I rode the bike and it seems all right and no leaks.
My OCD question: has anyone here ever seen or heard of any internal filter damage from a modestly over tightened filter?
 

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I've used Suzuki oil filters for the past 65,000 mile but on my last order they substituted Emgo 56-8566 filters. They claim they are equivalent and they do look identical right down to the round, not flat, gasket. The Suzuki filter calls for 2 turns after contact; Emgo 2/3.
When I stopped at 2/3 turn the filter felt too loose so I went another half turn, still almost a whole turn less than Suzuki. I rode the bike and it seems all right and no leaks.
My OCD question: has anyone here ever seen or heard of any internal filter damage from a modestly over tightened filter?
Never, unless the exterior is bent or dimpled. I use a Bales adapter and automotive filters, and I never use a wrench to install. I rarely have to use a wrench to uninstall either. Suzuki's recomendation is rediculous, especially since an O-ring requires less compression to seal than a flat gasket.

Tip: use moly grease on the oil filter gasket- it does not bake out/solidify as easily and makes the filter easier to remove.
 

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Suzuki's recommendation for 2 turns works fine, but only for Suzuki filters. It isn't just the shape and size of the O-ring, but the compressibility. We have had posts from people having trouble removing an overtightened filter and from people who had filters leak from not tightening them enough. Both were due to not following the filter maker's instructions. I haven't seen any other problems though.
 

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You probably don't have a problem with over tightening your filter. If you were to have a problem it would, most likely, be obvious pretty quickly.

When I read the instructions in the manual concerning the two full turns when tightening the oil filter, I thought I had misread it. Nope, that is what is in the manual.

Most filter instructions say to hand tighten until the gasket makes contact and then an additional 1/4 to 1/2 turn. Out of all the bikes and cars that I've owned not one required two full turns after gasket contact.

I was so concerned with the instruction that, even though I had a Suzuki OEM filter, I purchased a CarQuest branded filter and installed it [1/4 to 1/2 turn after gasket contact]. No leaks, no problems.

I've read on this forum that it is only the Suzuki OEM filter that requires the two full turns. I'll continue to use aftermarket filters.
 

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i agree and

Also if you choose to put high torque make sure you are tuning
the crimp edge part not the flimsy body
 

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When I recently did an oil change and read the 2 turns I thought it must be a misprint.

I used an aftermarket filter and there was no way I was going to do it up that tight and wreck the threads on the engine.
 

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Motorcycle oil filters and car filters can have different bypass circuit pressures. Its not good karma to use a car filter unless you know or can verify its bypass pressure.

I can tighten an OEM Suzuki filter 1-1/2 turns by hand and the final 1/2 or so with a strap wrench.

There are 3 things that make a bike last. Clean air filters, clean oil filters, and quality oil. Saving a few bucks on a filter of questionable spec and performance is not good advice.
 

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Just follow the filter manufacturers recommendations.. They've figured out how much torque you need to prevent the filter from leaking. There's a lot of difference between a flat washer on a filter and an O ring type like the Suzuki filter. The O ring type will require more torque to get them to seal properly.

I put a mark on the filer when it contacts the base and then tighten the recommended amount.
 

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My OCD question: has anyone here ever seen or heard of any internal filter damage from a modestly over tightened filter?
From one OCD guy to another: I've heard of gaskets being crushed, but nothing inside the filter. Like me, you will be paranoid about leaks for the first few days of riding, then that anxiety will go away until you see your oil level drop a little bit, then the left eye twitching begins again.

If you used your hand to tighten the filter as tight as you can, you will be okay. Unless you are Mr. Universe, I seriously doubt you can do any damage with your hand.
 

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Hand tighten a Suzuki oil filter and it may leak. It's happened before. What's the problem with following the filter manufacturer's spec? Just remember the spec in the manual for two turns is only for the Suzuki filter. Other brands will vary from hand tight to maybe one full turn, not much of a difference across the non OEM spectrum.
 

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Hand tighten a Suzuki oil filter and it may leak. It's happened before. What's the problem with following the filter manufacturer's spec? Just remember the spec in the manual for two turns is only for the Suzuki filter. Other brands will vary from hand tight to maybe one full turn, not much of a difference across the non OEM spectrum.
If you are replying to my comment: I was trying to make a point that it is difficult to do damage to any kind of oil filter if you tightened by hand only....
 

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If you are replying to my comment:
I wasn't. I was venting about the number of threads and posts on the subject going back for years.
 

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I just tried a WIX for the first time, it seemed a little loose at the recommended 3/4 turn, so I ended up going 1-1 1/4.

Still by hand of course no wrench.

Last filter was a K&N and it seemed tight enough at the recommended turns.
 

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...There are 3 things that make a bike last. Clean air filters, clean oil filters, and quality oil...
I certainly agree with the oil and oil filters comment, but I'm uncertain about the air filter one. Yes, I realize that dirt getting into the engine is a very bad thing, but does a "dirty" air filter allow more dirt to get into the engine than does a clean air filter?

People on this site have noted that oil filters trap more dirt as they're used more (replacing oil filter every other oil change), because some of the pores in the filter material are blocked or partially blocked by "dirt" particles, thereby permitting only smaller / tiny particles of dirt to pass through the filter. (I myself have always changed oil filters with each oil change.)

Do we imagine the same filter behavior applies to air filters? I know that in my life I've been much, much more careful to change oil and oil filters on schedule than I have to change air filters. On my autos I change air filters very few times in the lives of the vehicles and at that it seems I often replace rather clean air filters.

I've always thought of air filter changes being good for fuel efficiency (permitting a good, full volume of air to be available to support combustion thus avoiding a too-rich running condition). Maybe not true in any instance. Maybe not as true with fuel injected engines. Am I off base ?

Air filter in my Wee is original at 20K miles and fuel efficiency seems unchanged from nearly-new-bike performance.

Just wondering...
 

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I agree that a dirty air filter will not let more dirt pass trough it.

And i think that an extremly dirty air filter on an injection will not cause higher fuel consumption, for the reasons you said, but it would affect power available.

This said I change mine when I remove my plastic and fuel tank for other maintenance, because I am lazy and dont want to have to remove fuel tank again only to check my air filter.
 

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I certainly agree with the oil and oil filters comment, but I'm uncertain about the air filter one. Yes, I realize that dirt getting into the engine is a very bad thing, but does a "dirty" air filter allow more dirt to get into the engine than does a clean air filter?

People on this site have noted that oil filters trap more dirt as they're used more (replacing oil filter every other oil change), because some of the pores in the filter material are blocked or partially blocked by "dirt" particles, thereby permitting only smaller / tiny particles of dirt to pass through the filter. (I myself have always changed oil filters with each oil change.)

Do we imagine the same filter behavior applies to air filters? I know that in my life I've been much, much more careful to change oil and oil filters on schedule than I have to change air filters. On my autos I change air filters very few times in the lives of the vehicles and at that it seems I often replace rather clean air filters.

I've always thought of air filter changes being good for fuel efficiency (permitting a good, full volume of air to be available to support combustion thus avoiding a too-rich running condition). Maybe not true in any instance. Maybe not as true with fuel injected engines. Am I off base ?

Air filter in my Wee is original at 20K miles and fuel efficiency seems unchanged from nearly new-bike performance.

Just wondering...
The purpose of air filters is to prevent dirt or grit getting into the combustion chamber and scouring the cylinder wall/piston causing reduced compression and allowing oil from the sump into the combustion chamber.

Its an interesting theory that partly dirty filters perform better than new ones. However I doubt it. Filters have folded paper that traps the dirt between the folds and I have in extremely dusty conditions seen neglected air filters collapse and allow infiltered air straight into the engine. Surely air filters will only trap more dirt when the engine is trying to suck in dirtier air. They are not designed to trap "some" of the dirt.

I will stick to changing my oil filter every oil change and my air filter when it gets dusty on the outside. Dusty on the inside is too late.
 

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...Filters have folded paper that traps the dirt between the folds and I have in extremely dusty conditions seen neglected air filters collapse and allow infiltered air straight into the engine. Surely air filters will only trap more dirt when the engine is trying to suck in dirtier air. They are not designed to trap "some" of the dirt...
Thanks for the comments. I've always thought the purpose of the "folds" in the filter paper / media is to provide more filter surface area. Yeah I know bugs and other stuff gets trapped in the folds but that's just because they have to go somewhere, and they move as far into the filter geometry as their size will permit.

I've never seen a filter anywhere near as dirty as the one you describe that collapsed, but I don't doubt this possibility at all. I just don't ride in dusty conditions much, and when I do it's pretty tame. As I mentioned, most of the times, when I do change an air filter, visually it appears rather clean.

Regarding your comment about filters: "They are not designed to trap "some" of the dirt" :

I'm not a filter expert but I think most or all filters permit passage of particles of a certain size. I think I remember this from the days when I had to deal with water filters on a home well-water pump system (bad, distant memories) and I'd see filters that trapped particles of different (teeny tiny) sizes. No filter removes all contaminants. I've noticed no power decline on my Wee and I don't like to do work and spend money that I don't really have to so I think I'll wait awhile to change the air filter in my bike, unless someone can explain to me why I should change it sooner (reasons other than pointing to the owner's manual maintenance schedule, other than "well, I've always done it this way", etc).

Again, thanks for the comments and I'd like to hear others if other people have thoughts...
 

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Here is an example of what I've seen:

My home's furnace uses a 16x25 filter.

When I use the cheap blue filters, each strand of the blue fibers eventually gets thicker with dust as time goes on. The cooling coil fins build up dust in the beginning, but they don't collect as much after a few weeks.

This appears to be proof that as a filter gets more clogged, it traps more particles.

When I use the white allergen filters, the coil fins don't build up dust. Over a few weeks, the filter gets dirty and its shape bows to the air flow. Evidence that as the filter gets dirty, less air goes through, causing the fan's suction to deform the filter's shape.

So....what do I do? I stop using the cheap filters and use the less-expensive white ones, but change them out more frequently.

So, when it comes to my vehicle air filters...if I live in dusty conditions, I will change the filter more frequently than scheduled. I don't live in dusty areas, so I will change the filter at the scheduled interval.

As for oil filters.....Suzuki recommends every third oil change. Since I have OCD, I cannot sleep at night knowing that I put new oil in there with an old filter, so I probably will change the filter at every oil change, even though it is not necessary.

Also keep in mind that our bikes have a magnetic drain plug, which helps trap even more metal particles.
 
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