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I was in the mountains (yes the Dragon's Tail) a couple of weeks ago and I was talking to a fella in the parking lot who told me that I could put a 160/60/17 back tire on my DL 1000 and that would let me lean the bike more. I use all of the 150 back tire; would there be any benefit to using a 160?
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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I had a 160/60/17 on once because it was the only tire a dealer had that would fit when I needed a new one on a trip. It was fine for mileage but absolutely scary at high lean angles. The treads where they meets the sidewalls where chicken strips usually reside were parallel to the axis of the bike. The more I leaned the more it wanted to lean and the margin for error got very thin.

Oh! I won a bet with myself. When I read the title I bet myself whatever the old timer said would be bunk. That seems to be true most of the time. I often wonder how they get to be old timers. The other side of the coin is old timers can be the best source of info. It's just tricky to find the right old timers.

Another thing, I've been to the Rockies often and those hills back East aren't mountains. I don't care what the old timers call them.
 

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Another thing, I've been to the Rockies often and those hills back East aren't mountains. I don't care what the old timers call them.
This is a fact.
 

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Another thing, I've been to the Rockies often and those hills back East aren't mountains. I don't care what the old timers call them.
hahaha! My wife is from Washington state but we live in NC now. She says we just have foothills here. I tell her to go jump off of a foothill, then. :var_6:
 

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CVO Website - Mount Rainier Volcano

Washington's Mt. Rainier, NOT photoshopped, 14,411' peak elevation, about 13,000 foot rise above the surrounding region. One of five active volcanoes in Washington State--Baker, Glacier, Rainier, Adams, St. Helens. Five more in neighboring Oregon--Hood, Jefferson, Three Sisters, Newberry caldera, Mazama (Crater Lake). More volcanoes in B.C. and California. Washington's puny Mt. Olympus in Olympic National Park, northwest of Rainier, is merely 7,980 ft. high, with a 7,829 rise above the surrounding region. The place I've been skiing for years has lahar evacuation routes--a lahar is a flood of mud caused by hot lava melting the glaciers. My home is in a tsunami inundation zone and has tsunami evacuation routes--but no hurricanes, no tornadoes, no plague of locusts, no summer high humidity...no place is perfect.

About the tire sizes--our rear rims are 4" wide. The recommended rim width for the 160/60-17 tire is 4.50". 4" is in the "possible" width range for the 160, but experience shows that the additional curvature to fit the 160 on the 4" rim is problematic for good handling.
 

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Washington's Mt. Rainier, NOT photoshopped...
Yeah, I recently visited there. Mt Rainier was very impressive. I snapped this picture of my son walking towards it to climb up it the day we got there. I told him to hurry up and climb to the top and come back and wash up because we were going to be eating dinner soon. :mrgreen:
 

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Yeah, the Sierras, Grand Tetons, etc. are also mountains. They get above timberline.
 

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Hey ! watch it!

We have a cabin in N.E. TN., elevation 1648 and it's on Clinch Mountain aka "the mountain". Are they lying to me???? It's only around 13,000 ft. diff.
 

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Age does not necessarily automatically translate into experience or for that matter intelligence..I have met wise young persons, as well as foolish older people....
We have mountains here in Manitoba- but we were smart enough to lay them on their sides so they would be easier to climb.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Rockies

I had a 160/60/17 on once because it was the only tire a dealer had that would fit when I needed a new one on a trip. It was fine for mileage but absolutely scary at high lean angles. The treads where they meets the sidewalls where chicken strips usually reside were parallel to the axis of the bike. The more I leaned the more it wanted to lean and the margin for error got very thin.

Oh! I won a bet with myself. When I read the title I bet myself whatever the old timer said would be bunk. That seems to be true most of the time. I often wonder how they get to be old timers. The other side of the coin is old timers can be the best source of info. It's just tricky to find the right old timers.

Another thing, I've been to the Rockies often and those hills back East aren't mountains. I don't care what the old timers call them.
I have been to the Rockies also quite often in Colorado and I have said the same thing about foothills. I was thinking the tire may not make a good difference since I do not have problems leaning with the 150 I do not see a reason to change. I was curious about the information. The fella also told me "people" have had problems with the Pilot Road 3 tires coming apart on them any one heard of that?
 
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I think the word "Mountain" is one of those flexible words that can be used in many ways depending on the situation;
A mountain of garbage
A mountain of work
A mountain of bull____ (as in my case)
A mountain out of a mole hill
That lady has mountainous _______
Rocky Mountains

Etc..........
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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The fella also told me "people" have had problems with the Pilot Road 3 tires coming apart on them any one heard of that?
As far as I can tell, all the PR3 rumors came from a single incident. There is so much individual, non automated, input to making a tire, it would take a much larger sample to call it a problem.
 

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//
Another thing, I've been to the Rockies often and those hills back East aren't mountains. I don't care what the old timers call them.
Yes, and the Austrians, Swiss and French say the same about the Rockies in comparison to the high Alps. And in Nepal all of the above would be low-altitude foothills.

Not that this has anything whatsover to do with the OP's question. The DL's, being modestly powered, don't need more rear tire. And a wider tire or rim would likely make the bike less flickable.

Some people have 10 years experience, and some have one year of experience, 10 times....
 

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Yes, and the Austrians, Swiss and French say the same about the Rockies in comparison to the high Alps.
Switzerland has 48 mountains which are 4,000 meters (13,120 feet) or better. Colorado has over 55. The Alps and the Rockies are pretty comparable. The Andes and Himalayan regions can brag. I'm impressed by sights of craggy peaks above timberline anywhere. Tree covered hills don't do it for me.
 

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i had a 160 rear on to get home from phillip island and i can tell you it is toooooo much tyre for a v strom ...the front profile does not let the rear work like a sports bike....and as pat said the bike is no sports bike but we can scare alot of peolpe on a adventure tourer..
 

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Age does not necessarily automatically translate into experience or for that matter intelligence..I have met wise young persons, as well as foolish older people....
There are exceptions to every rule... and everyone (who's been to both) knows the eastern hills are not in the same league as the western ones.
 

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Switzerland has 48 mountains which are 4,000 meters (13,120 feet) or better. Colorado has over 55. The Alps and the Rockies are pretty comparable. The Andes and Himalayan regions can brag. I'm impressed by sights of craggy peaks above timberline anywhere. Tree covered hills don't do it for me.
Yes, all we have in the East is tree covered hills - except for the ones above tree line.....
 

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The tallest "mountain" in the east is Mt. Mitchell in North Carolina. It's 6684ft. Paved roads in Colorado get up to nearly twice that and come with trees.

 

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As far as I can tell, all the PR3 rumors came from a single incident. There is so much individual, non automated, input to making a tire, it would take a much larger sample to call it a problem.
Whether it was one or a hundred, it was enough for Michelin to quietly recall quite a few of them. They were rare as hens teeth for a while and it wasn't because of sales.
 

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The "mountain" argument appears to be about the quality of two different characteristics: elevation/height vs. transportation roads and trails.

In the "mountains" of the east, most of the "roads" (excluding present-day interstate highways) were in use as wagon roads, cow trails, paths to the local church well before Sutter struck gold in California. The eastern roads follow the contours of the land in the molehills and "mountains" and elsewhere. Automobile roads eventually follow the same trails and contours and are sometimes "interesting" as a result.

In the Mountains of the West, even the contours of the land were too crazy for human transportation. A very few arterial routes were built at great expense through the well-scouted "passes" (which are usually an engineer's idea of a joke). Mostly in the west, the roads are an attempt to overcome the terrain and not adapt to it. Most "roads" have tunnels and giant gaps blasted through the toughest spots. The result - NOT interesting roads. You must respect them -- like the deep blue sea, they'll kill you in a heartbeat -- but for a good ride you need your trusty "mule" on an "interesting" cow path in the east. You can travel only a small fraction of the mule trail roads in the west on a V-Strom.
 
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