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Has anyone tried any bicycle type preset torque wrenches for those little fasteners? I have read reviews and they are supposed to be pretty accurate and handy. kfh000
 

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To OP that is true about is a drip not a drip when rolling down the highway. It might be a bad time to find out if you are oiling the rear wheel in the middle of a tight curve. I was really fond of my new TV idea. I guess if you just stay home and watch TV while your bike drips in the garage you will be OK.
 

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Has anyone tried any bicycle type preset torque wrenches for those little fasteners? I have read reviews and they are supposed to be pretty accurate and handy. kfh000
A Harbor Freight 1/4" torque wrench is about $20. It's as accurate as more expensive ones.

Me I would use a 1/4" drive ratchet and try to tighten them a bit. I would doubt that they are loose though unless the cases have been split in the past. Typically they would have thread locker from the factory.

Torque is only critical there to not snap off the bolts. You can't warp the case!
 

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How about something like this:

Permatex.JPG



The product description says:

Sensor-safe, non-corrosive formula designed for superior adhesion to oily surfaces and long term durability
Superior resistance to powertrain fluids including engine oil, transmission fluid, gear lube and coolants

Retains high flexibility and eliminates the need for pre-formed, pre-cut, paper, rubber or cork gaskets; OEM
specified and approved for dealership warranty requirements

Temperature Range -65°F to 500°F (-54°C to 260°C) intermittent

Suggested Applications: Valve covers, oil pans, intake manifold end seals, timing covers, and differential covers Fit Type: Universal

I found this on Amazon by Googling "high temperature oil resistant RTV". It's apparently designed to adhere to oily surfaces, so having the surface scrupulously clean like you'd need with JB Weld won't be as much of a problem. To keep the application neat, you could mask on both sides of the seam that's leaking, then use a small flexible spatula to force the Permatex into whatever gaps are in the seam between the cases that's causing it to leak. Once you've spread the Permatex you can pull off the mask for the seam and you'll have a nice neat black seam. In the event that it doesn't work, it'll probably be a lot easier to remove than hardened JB Weld.

I think if I had a 13 year old bike of limited resale value, there would definitely be a cutoff point about how much I'd be willing to invest in repair. Definitely two grand would be out of the question. This stuff looks like an even simpler solution than the JB Weld, since it doesn't involve mixing the compound and it's specifically designed to act as a gasket.
 

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A Harbor Freight 1/4" torque wrench is about $20. It's as accurate as more expensive ones.

Me I would use a 1/4" drive ratchet and try to tighten them a bit. I would doubt that they are loose though unless the cases have been split in the past. Typically they would have thread locker from the factory.

Torque is only critical there to not snap off the bolts. You can't warp the case!
I will call you on the Harbor Freight comparison to a "brand name" torque wrench. I bought one thinking I could leave it on the bench to check something I do on clutch baskets. Save my KD for other things. At 7 lb ft of torque setting it would not click till WAY above that setting. Had I not tested it on a fastener held in a vise.....

I agree that a small 1/4" drive ratchet head is ideal for snugging a fastener that small.

From the picture posted I think someone has had a wrench on those bolts. Edges look rounded a bit.
 
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Permatex Ultra Black is good stuff.

But won't do a thing smeared over a leak like this. It is designed to be the sealer used when you put those two crankcase halves together. It needs a mechanical hold to keep it in place while it seals.
 

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I will call you on the Harbor Freight comparison to a "brand name" torque wrench...
Ancedotal but my son is a professional mechanic and checked Harbor Freight torque wrenches against the other mechanics Snapon wrenches when the Snapon truck came by one time.

The HF wrenches were closer to the actual torque values. All the Snapon driver had to say was "how about that".

My son had been using the HF wrenches for a few years, hasn't broken them. He works on heavy equipment too.
 

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@Spec and @realshelby got me thinking ... about how accurate my torque wrench is.
 

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Permatex Ultra Black is good stuff.

But won't do a thing smeared over a leak like this. It is designed to be the sealer used when you put those two crankcase halves together. It needs a mechanical hold to keep it in place while it seals.
In that case, I'd cut a small piece of 1/16" or even 1/8" thick aluminum stock as long as the area that's leaking and wide enough to bridge the seam between the two cases. I'd put the Permatex onto the piece of aluminum stock, press it against the leaking area, and then use something like scissor jack from a car to keep the aluminum piece in place until the Permatex cures. The pressure from the jack against the aluminum piece should force the Permatex into any gaps, and the pressure from the jack would form the mechanical hold between the engine cases and the aluminum piece until the Permatex cures. Would that work?
 

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I doubt that any "shenanigans" are going to fix this leak. It's either a) coming from somewhere else (I feel that pain; it took me a month and over $100 in parts I didn't need to find my leak!! Painful!!), or b) the case halves are slightly seperated and need to be tightened.

I've had my motor out and have split the cases. Not a fun job. But I have 4 case halves laying around in my garage that I can take pic's of if you need a visual of that area from the "inside"!
 

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I have the same leak on my K3 rear base gasket. If it was the front cylinder I would remove it and replace the gasket. For the rear, the engine has to be removed. For my 17 year old bike with 433,000 miles it isnt worth it to me. I did replace the 4 cylinder bolts and retorqued, no help. I will tell you that JB weld will NOT work by putting it on the outside trying to keep the oil in. Dont even try it. Your options, 1. ride it and let it leak like I do (keep an eye on the oil level), 2. pull the engine and replace the gasket, or 3. sell the bike and get a better newer model. Good luck

Kith
 

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It is under no pressure so a liberal coat of paint on a clean surface will do the trick. TRUST ME

Cleaning the surface is the important part.

For extra strength you can add fly screen mesh to the paint if you feel the need.
 

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... I will tell you that JB weld will NOT work by putting it on the outside trying to keep the oil in...
You must not have had much experience with JB :geek:

Plenty of punctured motorcycle cases have been repaired with the stuff
Done it myself.
 
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oh man i've used JB weld on several atv and dirt bike cases. Hell i had one that was holding the shifter into the case because it broke (as they always do) when the chain flopped and tore into the case. Not that it's the best way to go about it, but you can get a long ways with it.

I personally would not doing anything ot this bike yet. Keep riding it. Maybe do another oil change, with another washer for the drain plug, ride it for a few weeks, put a piece of paper or cardboard under it every time so you can catch the oil and see what's coming out. Then make your determination.
 

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put a piece of paper or cardboard under it every time so you can catch the oil and see what's coming out. Then make your determination.
You can also clean it again / warm it up and tape some toilet paper along the bottom in front of and behind the drain plug to see which way the oil is coming from.
 

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I too thought I had a leak from the same spot some time ago. I monitored it for a while. Turned out it was cast off oil from the front sprocket tracking down to the lowest point. That happened when I was still using oil on the chain.
 

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Did you change the filter? Maybe left the old filter gasket on the base. That usually results in a more spectacular leak though.
I have always had good luck pinpointing oil leaks by using spray foot powder. Clean the area and paint the powder on. It is easy to remove later.
JB Weld will work to seal oil leaks, I used some on an auto trans pan after I botched the welding of an oil temp sensor bung on it. Was still holding after several years.
 

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Ancedotal but my son is a professional mechanic and checked Harbor Freight torque wrenches against the other mechanics Snapon wrenches when the Snapon truck came by one time.

The HF wrenches were closer to the actual torque values. All the Snapon driver had to say was "how about that".

My son had been using the HF wrenches for a few years, hasn't broken them. He works on heavy equipment too.
Yes but for how long and how consistently?
 
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