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One more question, I admit to being a bit of a newbie when it comes to working on bikes but I'm trying to learn more to do as much of my own work as possible!

I replaced my air filter with a K&N filter (the mechanic at the shop I bought the bike at suggested I do that when the time came - in fact, I think they now replace them when they do the pre-delivery). It seems to make sense both from the pain in the arse factor of accessing the air box and the durability.

When I set out this morning I did notice it seems to have a little more pickup (probably in part because the last filter was definitely done!), but what I wonder about is that it sounds a bit different - a little bit deeper rumble - is that a normal thing to have changed just from replacement of the filter?
 

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Air box honk. Some folks feel that the K&N allows more air flow due to the design. A nice feature of the K&N is the service interval of 50K for cleaning and feeding. Some folks love 'em, some don't.
A pre screen, over the intake can eliminate a lot of bugs being collected on the filter.
 

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There are several sources of noise from an engine...intake (air box honk), mechanical including chain, and exhaust. Some air filters allow more intake noise to escape.
 

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All I'm going to say is that if it flows more air it has to flow more grit.

I've seen car engines apart that had run KN air filters ( I can't comment on whether they were service properly or not ) but it was pretty clear that the rings had worn much more than with a stock air filter. That is an example of grit getting into the intake system.

Again as all things in life, each to their own. It's your money do what you wish.
 

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All I'm going to say is that if it flows more air it has to flow more grit.

I've seen car engines apart that had run KN air filters ( I can't comment on whether they were service properly or not ) but it was pretty clear that the rings had worn much more than with a stock air filter. That is an example of grit getting into the intake system.

Again as all things in life, each to their own. It's your money do what you wish.
Very well said, thanks
 

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You know that 300,000 mile Vee everybody's been raving about? Guess what kind of air filter it uses.
 

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You know that 300,000 mile Vee everybody's been raving about? Guess what kind of air filter it uses.
One of Betty Davis' stockings?
 

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All I'm going to say is that if it flows more air it has to flow more grit.

I've seen car engines apart that had run KN air filters ( I can't comment on whether they were service properly or not ) but it was pretty clear that the rings had worn much more than with a stock air filter. That is an example of grit getting into the intake system.

Again as all things in life, each to their own. It's your money do what you wish.
A larger filter surface area will let more air through but not necessarily let more dirt through.
 

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A larger filter surface area will let more air through but not necessarily let more dirt through.
I agree with this statement but you haven't changed the physical dimensions of the filter when you discuss a K&N verses stock in the bike in question. The filter materials are different but the filtered area is the same, they both fit in the stock air box.

If you want to flow more air in the same size of filter there has to be either less filter material or a coarser filter media. If you double the size of an air filter ie: stack them like the old stock cars use to do, you will flow more air, but you've doubled the size of the filter, not changed the media.

I'm only stating what I've seen. I couldn't care less what you use on your bike, but in closing their has to a reason why something flows more air, there are no free rides. It's physics
 

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The filter is pleated. A smaller pleat angle could fit a much larger area of filter material in the same air box. Here are a pre 2007 filter on the left and a later filter on the right. The later filter has much more area and comes with a gasket but both fit the same box.

 

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You know that 300,000 mile Vee everybody's been raving about? Guess what kind of air filter it uses.
This is from a rider who stated he is mostly a street guy. On the street most anything will do but stock still filters better. I have disassembled many a dirt bike/atv motor that has died an earlier than necessary death due to K&N poisoning.

Ask yourself, why would one filter last 50,000 and another 20,000. They both are stopping dirt. No thanks, even though they are cheaper to use, K&N filters are only worth getting for the sticker.
 

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I've seen a lot of dusted motors as well, and it's rarely the filter's fault. Almost every time, if you're careful when you dismantle things, you'll find the owner didn't install the filter correctly and often didn't maintain it properly in the case of a washable item. Anyone that rides in dirt should know to up the maintenance schedule to accommodation the tougher conditions. Cars, bikes and trucks are all the same. If you expect it to breath dust, you need to clean or replace your filters far more often than if you keep it in clean air it's whole life. Bleating "it's the filter's fault" when the owner couldn't be bothered doing proper maintenance isn't credible.
 

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I had a K&N filter installed today, had the usual spiel about them being better, I do have one in the car. While the bike was at the shop I get a call from the sales guy saying that I should get a dyno because the motor breathes better now combined with the Akra exhaust and that I should get the ecu tuned. He mentioned that a gixxer which had 15hp~ increase after they tuned the ecu after getting a K&N filter/after market exhaust. I replied that the strom is a camry on two wheels, there is no need to dyno. He pulled out the fuel economy speech, now considering that I get can 450km's out of a tank, I doubt that it's an issue.

Is a dyno worth it?
 

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Is a dyno worth it?
As long as the engine is running alright and you aren't the type who is obsessed with wringing another 2hp out of it, I wouldn't bother.
 

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The dyno tune is worth it if you want the extra 3 hp. But you are going to lose fuel mileage. They are shooting for 13 to 1 AF ratio at WOT. Not for best fuel mileage.

I had a chance for a free dyno run a few weeks ago, but life got in the way. You can look out for cheap dyno runs at free events when they come up. Or $20 dyno runs.

I'm still on the K&N bandwagon. I like to be able to clean the filter myself and not buy a new one every 11k miles for $42 bucks.
 

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We used to joke on the Tacoma forum about K&N with "leafcatcher technology":green_lol: It's true at first they are not really great at filtering.
The thing is....the more dirt you get in em...the better they filter. This is pretty cool because if you don't clean them they work awesome and you don't have to touch them. Any other filter out there you know of that improves it's filtering capability with age? They are so porous to begin with even loaded with dirt they flow great. The business about increased HP is pretty dubious because the computer will seek the same fuel air mixture regardless. I run them because of the set it and forget it factor. These claims of ruined engines directly tied to K&N filters and questionable. Sure if you take a K&N and run it hard in super dusty conditions you're going to get more dirt compared to the stock filter but that seems common sense which I guess isn't that common. For the other 99% of us who ride mostly street or 80/20 it's a complete non-issue. I've had one in my Tacome 4x4 since 2004 which goes off road way more than my DL650. Cleaned it once in 2005 but now every year or so I take it out and knock the bugs out. They work and they are virtually maintenance free.
 

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My opinion on K&N was formed by the repeated cleaning of throttle bodies on the other side of the filter. There was typically a layer of fine dust between the filter and the butterflies. I am also not a huge fan of sucking the filter oil mist through the intake where it works wonders on the TPS internals.

If I follow the K&N theory, the first half of the filters life it is letting shit through then as it builds up a cake of crap on the filter it starts working better. Something about this idea confounds my sense of logic.

Like I said, the sticker is the best part.

And, stock filters are easily good for 20,000 miles or so. My labor is worth something to me and it takes 1/2 to 1 hour to clean, dry, and oil a K&N and you are buying cleaner and oil. I therefore would dispute some of the savings also.
 
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