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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I really like this modification that Guardian has posted HERE. I like the ingenuity of it and also the cost savings. Around here, a replacement filter for my bike is around $55. The most important thing I like about this modification is, it makes my bike easier to service.

A lot of the riding I do takes me to remote places; or to places that don't have a local motorcycle dealership nearby. This is the number one reason I WILL NOT purchase a BMW motorcycle. BMW dealerships are sparsely located and it is very expensive to buy and ship parts. I have a much greater chance of finding a Suzuki dealership, then a BMW dealership where I ride.

A couple of weeks ago when I dumped my bike in the "Moncton Mud Puddle", I didn't have a clue of what I was going to be up against financially in repair costs. But, back in the woods, literally "up the creek without a paddle", I was feeling relieved that, "It could be worse. I only own a Suzuki and not a BMW." I felt fairly confident that, once I got out of the woods, and got some help, I could make the repairs myself. About $75 and 6 hrs of work, I was riding home, and grinning ear to ear that my bike and me survived another adventure together. (There will be an upcoming video on this experience.).

I did not get any water into the bike's air box. It was clean and bone dry. But, what if I did? (I would have been in even deeper "doo-doo"). At the very least, I was going to need a new air filter. At a Canadian dealership, my guess is that would be around $65. That's IF I could find a dealership! But, I can find an auto parts store, or a Canadian Tire, or similar store, like a Wal-Mart. If I need to, I can now fit a new air filter to my bike from nearly every geographical location I currently ride in.

I spent quite a bit of time at my local Wal-Mart yesterday going through all of the Fram air filters they carry. The CA3916 is the standard paper Fram filter that fits nearly perfectly over the OEM filter hole. I decided to purchase the Tough Guard version. It is a pre-oiled filter designed for SUVs and pickup trucks where their working environment is dustier then normal, street use. That part number is: TGA3916 and again, is just slightly larger then the OEM filter hole.

I saved my old air filter from my last change 30,000 miles ago......... I have modified it using Guardian's post as a guideline to the process. I made a couple of changes.

The pictures below walk through how I did my modification.

I used a utility knife to cut the old OEM filter media out of the filter throat.


I removed the old media.


I tried using my utility knife to cut the "throat" off of the filter flange. The plastic is too hard. It's the kind of cutting that leads itself to slicing a thumb or finger.....


I switched over to my Dremel tool; using a "fibre-reinforced" cut-off wheel.


Once the throat was removed, I sharpened up a paint scraper with a file and "cut" what remained of the throat down to the flange; making everything flat and smooth and removing any plastic burrs.


Here is the OEM filter with the throat removed and the scraped flange. I decided to leave the OEM screen in place.


I spent quite a bit of time ruminating on what adhesive to use to bond the new filter to the OEM filter flange. I work in the marine industry and I have access to some "bomb proof" stuff, but I decided to again, "keep it simple"; thinking about future maintenance and subsequent changes.

I chose the below product. It is a very thick, very tough contact cement. I purchased it at my local Lowe's.


I squeezed a nice bead of the cement around the base of the Fram filter and also around the filter flange. I let these two surfaces dry about 10 mins as per the adhesive's instructions.


After the alloted drying time had passed, I "mated" the two parts together and placed a firebrick on top. I let the "new" filter sit overnight.


When I got home from work today, I examined the glue bond. I gave the filter a really good tug to try and tear it apart. It wouldn't budge. But, I decided, as a precaution to put another bead of the cement around the edge of the filter creating a "filet".




I have not installed this filter yet. I plan to do that on Wednesday evening, (heading back to Vermont - Lake Champlain on Friday for the weekend.). I don't think I will have any fitment issues. I will report them if I do and also any performance issues as well.

The cost was under $15.

Thanks Guardian, this was a great solution for me!

Barry B.
 

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I'd rather spend the $60 for the K&N and then never have to change it out again. Just give it a good cleaning when I change the oil.
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #4
I'd rather spend the $60 for the K&N and then never have to change it out again. Just give it a good cleaning when I change the oil.
Really?

Every time you do a "quick" oil change, you also want to remove the the side cowlings, so that you can remove the fuel tank to be able to get at your K&N air filter to clean it and re-oil it, to then put it all back together?

K&N air filters are good and have their place, but I don't believe on my DL-650 they are a true cost savings.
 

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You don't have to clean it every oil change. That's just personal preference. You could just clean it when you would normally change the air filter. After 2 or 3 cleanings, it's paid for itself. Then you also don't have the hassel of modifying the old filter and cleaning all of that cement off when it needs to be changed.

Honestly, I didn't know how much was involved with getting to the air filter on these bikes. If that's the case, then I would extend that interval as well.
 

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Honestly, I didn't know how much was involved with getting to the air filter on these bikes. If that's the case, then I would extend that interval as well.
It's kind of a pain to get at the filter, but not so bad if you only do it once a year or so. Whether you need to go in more often mostly depends on where you ride and how much you ride.

I Had the dealer do it both times I had my valves checked. I do most of my own maintenance and would do it all if I had a garage. Still, changing the air filter is not that difficult even in my driveway.
 

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I like this mod and will either do this or Glitch's mod when I return home.


FYI, if you are doing lots of dirt roads and are slow enough to be behind other people, stick to the OEM paper filter. IN fact why bother with a messy oil based one anyway?

The reason I say this is because if you are out bush and the filter is dirty,at least with an OEM, or modified paper one, you can bash it on a rock to clean it, try taking cleaning gear and extra oil for a K&N.

Anyway, just my thoughts

Cheers
TravellingStrom
 

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What Kinda Bike Is That?
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Discussion Starter #9
I like this mod and will either do this or Glitch's mod when I return home.


FYI, if you are doing lots of dirt roads and are slow enough to be behind other people, stick to the OEM paper filter. IN fact why bother with a messy oil based one anyway?

The reason I say this is because if you are out bush and the filter is dirty,at least with an OEM, or modified paper one, you can bash it on a rock to clean it, try taking cleaning gear and extra oil for a K&N.

Anyway, just my thoughts

Cheers
TravellingStrom
Your point is partly why I have done what I have done and stuck with a paper medium. Also, I can find a Fram TGA3916 a lot easier on a shelf in "no-where-ville" if necessary, then I can an OEM filter.

I know that you speak from Kms of experience!

B.
 

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I can find a Fram TGA3916 a lot easier on a shelf in "no-where-ville" if necessary, than I can an OEM filter.
Doesn't have to be a Fram. Every brand of auto air filter will have a cross reference to the Fram 3916. Anyway, good workaround for likely better filtration at low cost. I also expect those deep pleats to hold more dirt before significant resistant to flow is encountered vs. either the smaller OEM or K&N. K&N measures very high resistance once it is dirty, but this isn't widely known. These measurements are with a measured amount of lab "dirt" of specific particle sizes put into various types of filters.
 

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I thought I saw a thread on doing this using a Ryco filter available in Australia. I can't find a cross reference from Fram to filters available down under.

Was there such a thread?
 

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I thought I saw a thread on doing this using a Ryco filter available in Australia. I can't find a cross reference from Fram to filters available down under.

Was there such a thread?
+1 Would be handy to know which one fits in Aus.
 

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Thanks very much. I priced a genuine filter today and it was A$52.
 
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