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Take your bike to the shop to show them what you need to be done.
take rack off,get them to cut & tack weld it together.
Fit it to the bike loosely to make sure everything lines up.(easier to tweak it now).
take it off bike for final welding.
check fitment.
clean, paint & install.

Then take it out in the dirt; & bash the S*it out of it.
 

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2014 Suzuki DL1000A
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
cut & tack weld it together. Fit it to the bike loosely to make sure everything lines up.(easier to tweak it now). take it off bike for final welding.
That's good. One of the problems I was thinking about was how do I get a shop to prototype or mockup the work. Cut & Tack is the answer to that question.

I don't expect the welds to be difficult for an experienced welder. It's steel. What's tricky is fitting the bent pipe. You want to get this "wing" positioned over mounting bolts, which gives you two funny angles that are not the same angle nor 90-degrees to the bend.

The next problem I was thinking about was choosing the right shop. I don't need a machinist, but will a guy with an angle grinder and welding gear know how to fabricate? In the first case I guess I'm looking for a shop that does exactly this kind of work. In the second case I need a really good idea of what I want (drawings?), and how to do it (cut & tack) so I can keep a guy accountable and on point. I have to pull the plug if they don't seem to know what they're doing.

Automotive tire Automotive design Motor vehicle Rim Personal luxury car
 

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Take it to a a bike / custom car shop that does fabrication and has a mandrel tube bender. A sketch with rough dims would help convey what you want, don't worry about providing a drawing with GD&T.

Are you starting with an existing crash bar or starting from scratch?

If scratch, you might be better off (read: less expensive) to just buy an off the shelf crash bar. Depending on your area, I'd expect custom fab to be billed at $90-130/hr + mat'ls and a few weeks without your bike. If the labor is cheaper, find a better shop. I'd swag a minimum of $600 in labor into this project. Lotsa bikes going into shops this time of year, you may be in for a wait.
 

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I have wondered for years why "Adventure" & most street bikes only provide engine/tupperware protection and zero rider. It seems only the cruiser bikes get the Harley elephant ear type engine guards. I still think that kind of protection would have prevented my 90 degree foot rotation, resulting in 27 screws and two plates on my Tib & Fib.

Xtian, good luck with your design and fight against form over function.....keep us posted.
 

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2011 650 V-Strom with ABS
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If you have never welded, I would encourage you to think about trying it. A $250 dollar flux core welder makes it shockingly easy. Bending mild steel pipe can be as simple or sophisticated as you want. For years I had no bender at all. I would just cut a few "pie" pieces out of the inside of the curve so it bends easily to the appropriate angle and then weld it back. It really is as simple as running a hot melt glue gun, but with steel.

Plus, this will make all kinds of other things possible, like a rear wheel paddock stand, custom mounts to use Dewalt tool boxes as paniers, fancy modern steel and glass furniture, making your trailer stronger, etc etc etc x 1,000.

The welder might pay for itself on this first job. Second job almost certainly. And there are 8,000 videos on YT to teach you anything you could possibly want to know about bending and welding and fabricating. It's like a minor super power. Zero judgement if you don't want to go down that path, but it's a tremendous amount of fun.
 

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If you have never welded, I would encourage you to think about trying it. A $250 dollar flux core welder makes it shockingly easy. Bending mild steel pipe can be as simple or sophisticated as you want. For years I had no bender at all. I would just cut a few "pie" pieces out of the inside of the curve so it bends easily to the appropriate angle and then weld it back. It really is as simple as running a hot melt glue gun, but with steel.

Plus, this will make all kinds of other things possible, like a rear wheel paddock stand, custom mounts to use Dewalt tool boxes as paniers, fancy modern steel and glass furniture, making your trailer stronger, etc etc etc x 1,000.

The welder might pay for itself on this first job. Second job almost certainly. And there are 8,000 videos on YT to teach you anything you could possibly want to know about bending and welding and fabricating. It's like a minor super power. Zero judgement if you don't want to go down that path, but it's a tremendous amount of fun.
And the satisfaction when you build something by yourself = priceless 👍

Q: can you fill the pipe with water, freeze and then bend? I've seen it done on copper pipes.
 
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I've built crash bars and peculiar luggage racks from time to time. One engine guard was for a longitudinal 4 cylinder BMW. Like our V-Stroms there is no "cradle" bottom section of the frame. Everything had to drop down from above and brace, side to side.
Lining up the elements and welding them on the bench such that they stay lined up with the various OEM frame bolt points... Yuk. The method I use can be generally described like this:
_ Buy a selection of pre-bent chrome-molly tubing. 45°, 90° and U bends. Buy extra of the U bends. Quite affordable .
_ Buy two sticks of straight tubing. One the same as your bent stuff and the other a slip fit for the inside dimension.
_ Buy some flat stock for the bolting tabs or pre-made tabs.
_ Buy a package of pellets for a pellet gun. (Huh?)
You will use short pieces of the "inside" tubing as connectors. The objective here is to be able to rotate (swivel) the erector set to line up perfectly. Next up is to hold those pieces in that exact orientation as you move it to the bench for welding. Here is where the pellets come in. Drill a hole in the side of the "outside"/main tubing such that you can stick a pellet in the hole and up against the "connector" inside. Then you can use a vice grip to smoosch the pellet and lock the two pieces in place. Now you can take it to the bench for tack welding. Build up whatever lattice work you need and test fit, etc.
I hope that makes sense. Tiring to be brief can be hard.
(the extra U bends are handy to get two out of it at any degree from1 to 180 etc)
 
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You might be able to find a guy with a welder on a site like Craigslist. Just make sure they're certified, but from the sound so of this weld won't be a vital structure point so you should be fine. Just grind off the paint and clean the area before you weld to avoid contamination.
 

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Can you please advise where you can source these items? I Googled "pipe end / 2way / 3way clamps" and nothing similar came up. Thanks!
try "display rack clamps or rack scaffold connector" also in "sailboats and marine bimini hardware"



Font Auto part Technology Event Automotive tire
 
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Or just strap a couple of Spaldings :LOL:
Tire Wheel Vehicle Land vehicle Automotive tire


Or couple of car jacks to help you lift it the first 10" which are the hardest... make sure you mount the crank receiver facing up, just like I did ;) (Patent pending)
Tire Wheel Vehicle Plant Motor vehicle
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Spalding for sure...I want the bounce..mayhaps I won't have to do any lifting.

As for fittings, there's a good resource for manufacturers based in the United States, Thomasnet.com

Even if you're not in the US, it can be a good research resource. Figure out the names of things and major product manufacturers.
 
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