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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Commuting home and not actually using the brakes at the time and the ABS light came on. Immediate thought was "well that'll leave more space in the garage", with > 130,000k's on the clock that won't be worth spending money fixing. That said, it'd be embarrassing if ....

Get home, check the sensors - still tight. (I have had one back out with exactly these symptoms).
Remove sensors, clean with a paper towel with a drop of kero on it. (Metallic crap stuck to the sensor will also do this). Reinstall sensors with a drop of lock-tite on the retaining bolt. Quick run up & down the road. Nope, ABS fault light is still on.

Check fuses.
FYI didn't do that first because I had to find a multimeter and no great effort was being made here so check the stuff where I have the tools at hand first.
ABS fuses look and meter O.K., wipe blades with silicone grease - reinstall. Do the same to the spares.
While I'm there, check, clean and wipe the fuses in the main box the same way.
Remove the ABS relay and tap it on the floor a couple of times, it's contacts also get the silicone grease treatment.
Put everything back, put seat on, go for a quick ride - no more ABS fault.

Best guess corrosion I couldn't see on the ABS control box fuse. The power circuit and relay wouldn't have been active when the light came on.

Oh well, no new bike :)

Not that I dislike the 650, it's been a good friend to me for quite a few years now but it's still around more because I'm curious as to how long it'll last with only normal maintenance than any real need to keep it running.

Current guess is longer than I will ;)
 

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Even if the ABS went out and its not worth fixing the bike could still be ridden for years to come w/o issue just no ABS.

I've always said that motorcycle owners live by the motto if you are not over maintaining it your bike you must be undermaintaining it. I get a kick out of the guys who use expensive exotic oils and change it every 200 miles. New brake pads when they are only 1/2 worn, flush the coolant system 3 times a year and bleed the brakes every other ride and check the valves every 2,500 miles.


Then there are the small percentage of owners/maintainers that use regular earthly oil/chemicals and change the oil ever 5,000 to 7,000 miles or even a little longer if out on an extended trip. Change/flush the coolant once a decade or so and bleed the brakes and check the valve clearance once at 10,000 miles another a 30,000 miles to find they have not moved so they determine the valves can be checked every 50,000 miles w/o concern.

In the end if bikes are kept long enough owners from either group find that there is no discernable difference in longevity of the bike as long as it received some maintenance throughout its life.

Most people get tired of the bike long before its even close to being worn out so they sell them and don't even get to bear the assumed benefit of over maintenance even thought the reality is over maintenance does not increase the longevity or value, it simply just costs more.
 

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I liked both of these comments.

First, I'm currently experiencing an ABS issue similar to what's described in the original post. I've gone as far as checking the sensors and visually inspecting the ABS fuses. Now I have a few other items to check before I decide whether I should drop the coin on an ABS control unit.

Second, I really relate to the second comment...not because I fall into either of the 2 camps, but because I fall somewhere in between. With unlimited time and money, I would prefer everything I own to be constantly kept pristine. But the reality is that it's an impossible goal for someone of my means. So I maintain my stuff as I have the time and money available. I change my oil at the end of every season, after about 4,000-6,000 miles of riding, with synthetic oil. Yes, I would probably be OK to go further or I could use cheaper oil, but it makes me feel better knowing I'll start the next riding season with fresh, high quality oil. Other things I'll cheap out on, like using Shinko tires rather than some higher-dollar brands that may last longer. Sometimes I'll simply avoid fixing something for lack of time or money, as is the current situation with my ABS. So I continue riding, knowing that I don't need the ABS (I rode other bikes for 7 years with no ABS), but seeing that little amber light on AAAALLLLLL the time is a bit bothersome.
 

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Check battery and stator....symptom of weak battery for me was ABS light....


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In my case, I checked the battery just the other day -- not because I suspected it as a cause of the ABS light, but because it's still the battery that came with the bike when I purchased it from the previous owner and I've had the bike for 3 years. But the numbers were all within proper specs.

As for the stator, I had mine replaced as part of the recall right after I picked up the bike. So I'd be surprised if the new one was going already.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Good point, first thing I checked once I found the multimeter was the battery. 13.35V after sitting for a few minutes. Though if the ABS warning is up because the battery is flat you haven't got much left, it certainly wouldn't have started for the first unsuccessful test ride. I've also had that happen and the generally poor running that went with the first time wasn't apparent this time.

Run to and from work today and so far it seems fine.

And the reason I'd retire the 650 if the ABS went is that both my bikes do have ABS, I rode non-ABS bikes for many years and vastly prefer ABS particularly in commuter traffic which here seems to have more of it's fair share of stoned and or elderly drivers.
 
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