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Discussion Starter #1
This is a very easy installation. I've got a lot of great info from this site so I hope these pictures can help some one else.

The EB ABS bypass adactor comes with factory connectors on one end to tie into the ABS connector and slip on connectors for the switch on the other end. The cost is $11.95 + shipping. I also purchased a 20 amp switch. EB recommends a heavy duty switch of at least 15 amp capacity. The cost is $9.95 + shipping. Shipping costs from EB are very reasonable, especially coming from Japan.

I wanted to have full access to the connector area so I had to remove my Givi luggage racks to get the side body panels off. After that it's just a matter of identifying the right connector to plug into. You could do this installation without removing the body panel, but it will be a tight reach. On the left side of the bike, near the battery positive terminal is the connector you're looking for. I have a 2009 Wee and the connector on my bike is white. You want to use the connector that leads to the 25A ABS fuse.
P1220001.jpg , P1220004.JPG , P1220006.jpg ,
After I made the connection I put the seat on and went for a quick ride to be sure I had the right connection. You can turn the ABS off any time and when you turn it off, the ABS light remains lit. To turn it back on, you have to turn the bike off, flip the ABS switch and re-start the bike.

Once you get the proper connection, it's just a matter of determining a location for your switch, running the wire and connecting it to the switch. I decided to locate my switch on the flat area of the fairing to the left of the dashboard.
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I drilled a hole to accomodate the switch and then installed the switch before connecting the wire to the switch. I ran the wire behind the frame following the factory harness and my GPS wire. I wasn't comfortable running the wire to the steering head and then spanning the gap over to the left fairing. I ended up running the wire along the bottom of the left fairing where there is a large groove in the body panel for another harness. The wire then runs up the inside of the fairing to the switch. This kept the wire away from any interference with the handlebars.
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That's about it. I've also installed a left side Powerlet socket, and the 3CS Circuit, both from Eastern Beaver. I like Eastern Beaver products as they're well made and the connectors plug right into the factory connectors. They look and perform like they came from the factory.
 

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How serious of an off-road situation do you need to be in for cutting off the ABS to be important?

Does it help on your standard gravel fire-road, or is it for more muddy singletrack riding?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My so called dirt riding is limited to gravel and fire roads. Having the ABS on has never been a problem for me on those kinds of roads up to this point. I guess for $20 and a half hour of time I thought it was one of those good just-in-case additions to have. The recycling of the ignition may prove to be a bit of a hassle but I think I can live with that.
 

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Hey, were not knocking you... I do a lot of gravel roads myself.... It's just that ABS isn't an issue for me personally in these type of roads.... It's all good...:yesnod:
 

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There have been a couple of times coming downhill on a rutty gravel road that I wished the ABS wasn't doing its thing. I pulled the fuse after that, and felt much more in control. I've got the ABS adapter from EB now, and just waiting for a switch to come to wire it in. Cycling power to reset it is no big thing to me, you can do that while coasting if you really don't want to stop for a few seconds.

Good pictures.
 

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Here's an example. Where ABS really hurts is on loose downhills. This newbie was trying to ease down the hill by sliding his feet and modulating the front brake. when the bike exceeded the 3mph ABS limit, the ABS kicked in and he effectively had no brakes. Watch the brake light. The only time it wasn't on is when he was holding on for dear life and couldn't actuate it.

 

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Here's an example. Where ABS really hurts is on loose downhills. This newbie was trying to ease down the hill by sliding his feet and modulating the front brake. when the bike exceeded the 3mph ABS limit, the ABS kicked in and he effectively had no brakes. Watch the brake light. The only time it wasn't on is when he was holding on for dear life and couldn't actuate it.

Thanks for posting that, Pat. It brought back a fond (not really) memory of my ABS-on-a-loose-downhill experience. It wasn't as severe as that but ended up with me pinned between the bike and the bank on the side of the "road" with bent case hardware and a broken windshield. It's pretty unnerving when you're slamming the brakes and your bike is picking up speed.

After almost four years, I'm still pulling the fuse on rough or unknown conditions. In most cases, it's not an issue, I've just improved my common sense.
 

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Here's an example. Where ABS really hurts is on loose downhills. This newbie was trying to ease down the hill by sliding his feet and modulating the front brake. when the bike exceeded the 3mph ABS limit, the ABS kicked in and he effectively had no brakes. Watch the brake light. The only time it wasn't on is when he was holding on for dear life and couldn't actuate it.



Ah, I've experienced a similar thing when I first started snowmobiling...not fun!



That type of riding doesn't look like something I'd want to do on a Wee, but it's also a good example of why it's probably worth the $20 switch- you never know what's over the next hill.
 

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I was just recently informed that I might not want ABS on muddy dirt/gravel highways (think Alaska). I had no idea eastern beaver had an ABS defeat switch. I'll definitely be buying one once I get my wee. For the money, it's great to have the option -- even though I am SPECIFICALLY only shopping for bikes that come with ABS.
 

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FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
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There's another ABS on/off switch option that allows switching on the fly without having to turn the ignition switch off. Proper ABS on/off switch
 

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There's another ABS on/off switch option that allows switching on the fly without having to turn the ignition switch off. Proper ABS on/off switch
I just did this mod and tested it last weekend.Works as advertised.
I used the same switch as in post #12 in the link and it fits perfectly.
Total cost was less than $5.00.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hey, were not knocking you... I do a lot of gravel roads myself.... It's just that ABS isn't an issue for me personally in these type of roads.... It's all good...:yesnod:
No problem and no offense taken. We're all just sharing opinions and experience to help each other out. As you said.......it's all good!
 

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i have seen this video surface a number of times - i wonder if the people in the video have a detail description what actually happened.

it seem to me that he has the brake locked first- after sliding for a few metres - his mate yell out "let go the brake", to which he thought he has to completely let go the brake (maybe he even leg go of the clutch too) - u can see the brake light was not on - by the time he grab the brake again (about 1/3 way down) he is already gain too much momentum.

If he brake hard again without the ABS, the front will most likely locked (hopefully he didnt grab too hard to flip him over) - umm with 250kg + rider rolling mass, a steep hill, the heart pumping fast, i am not sure an novice rider would have the skills the keep the front lock and keep the bike upright.

I am a novice dirt rider, last time i approach down a steep hill fully loaded was go very slow in first gear and feather the brake - sure experienced dirt rider can go down with some more speed and dig in the front tyre when necessary by grabbing the front brake and locking the front wheel - but my approach got me through without the much drama - the ABS kicked in a couple times but didnt send me coasting down the hill like in that video.

what i am saying is that in that video, perhaps the problem wasnt so much the ABS as the riders technique.
 

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No problem and no offense taken. We're all just sharing opinions and experience to help each other out. As you said.......it's all good!
.... then again.... gravel roads are flat around where I live... since I don't do any serious off road stuff, I haven't had to worry about shutting down the ABS.... I am sure my opinion would change if I road some hilly, gravel stuff.... Something to consider. Thanks for your post...

Richard
 

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So I just noticed in the manual the ABS doesn't work at 6mph or under...I would think that solves most problems a Strommer might find themselves in.

If traction is so poor or conditions so muddy that you're worried about ABS interfereing with your riding will you really be going faster than 6mph? I probably wouldn't.
 

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It's 5kph or 3mph, walking speed. Look at the video in post #8 here. The limit was exceeded with both feet down and it got worse from there.
 

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But that's a Beemer?


My K8 manual says "ABS does not work at very low speed, less than 10Km/H(6mph), and does not work with a discharged battery".

Unless this is another example of the owners manual being wrong.
 

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Watch the ABS light after you first start the engine. When it goes off is when ABS is first engaged. Even if the activation speed is higher than the initial light off speed, 6mph instead of 3mph, that's way too slow to assure you don't go that fast. Go that fast on a loose downhill and it may be the only time laying a bike down on purpose before picking up speed is a good idea because you'll have no brakes to speak of.
 
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