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2014 Suzuki DL1000A
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm on Long Island, New York and its starting to get into the 30s overnight. The previous owner of my 2014 VEE (I bought her this past summer) kept my baby in a heated garage. I let my last moto get the worst of winter. I'm determined to do better this time. I've been searching for a winter garage I can afford, but its been slow going, so I started some winterization maintenance. It started out good and then downhill from there.

I got a can of "Water Displacement 40th formula" and treated all the metal parts. I knew WD-40 on the rotors and calipers was a bad idea. But just like beer goggles, thinking about my moto parked outside in freezing temps, I just went ahead and did it anyway. So, yeah. I did that.

Now, a week later I'm moving the bike to a new spot for winter, and surprise! Pulling the brake lever, I got none of the normal travel. I roll to a stop like I have drum brakes.

If a bottle of WD-40 made the problem, maybe if spray some 3M High Power Brake Cleaner degreaser I will magically fix the problem.
Despite reading the warning this product might discolor plastic, I go for it and the overspray leaves a mark.
The lever is still different, and the brakes don't bite like they did before. But now my plastic faring has an overspray scar! GRRR!

At this point I'm guessing my brake pads are shot, so I bought a new set (Partzilla $250).

My question, is there anything else I should plan to frack up? or buy soon after this WD-40 $#!T storm?
And if I'm paying $250 for new pads, should I resurface my rotors?

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My experience of WD40 is mixed. I've had rubber seals & components either swell or disintegrate, so my advice is don't use it. I've had better results with a product called FS365 which is also hydrocarbon based but doesn't appear to deteriorate rubber parts and is water washable when you want to remove it.
The brake discs will clean up with brake cleaner fluid but I suspect the pads will not be recoverable but you could try immersing them in the brake cleaner fluid and then washing them with detergent.
 

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I would clean pads with brakemen & lightly scuff them up with EMORY CLOTH,NOT SAND PAPER.RINSE WITH BRAKLEEN. Same with rotors.There is a reason O.E.M. PADS last longer ,& feel good longer; they are made for YOUR BIKE.
OR IF YOU WANT TO TRY THIS,& have nothing to lose(in a controlled place),ride around ,dragging brakes to burn off WD40. Leave time to cool them down— coasting.Nothing to lose; except a few dollars!,
 

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I would clean pads with brakemen & lightly scuff them up with EMORY CLOTH,NOT SAND PAPER.
There's no guarantee that aftermarket brake pads (which, given that you're not the original owner, you may have, unless you know otherwise) do not contain asbestos. Many are still in the pipeline. OEM pads probably do not. Either way, I would not sand them.

These are safety-critical parts. I would just replace the pads, and clean the rotors with brake cleaner.
 

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2012 DL650A
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There's no guarantee that aftermarket brake pads (which, given that you're not the original owner, you may have, unless you know otherwise) do not contain asbestos. Many are still in the pipeline. OEM pads probably do not. Either way, I would not sand them.

These are safety-critical parts. I would just replace the pads, and clean the rotors with brake cleaner.
How would asbestos in brakes pads be a problem? I don't feel like I inhale enough brake dust for it to cause health issues.
 

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How would asbestos in brakes pads be a problem? I don't feel like I inhale enough brake dust for it to cause health issues.
There is no safe level of asbestos when inhaled. You defintely do not want to be sanding it.

I'm sure you won't find asbestos in OEM pads anymore, but there used to be lots of them made that way, and cheap imports may still be, especially old stock.
 

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What I really wanna know, though, is why the OEM pads for the liter bike are so much more expensive than the pads for the Wee? Like, 50% more expensive.
 

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Bork
verb (used with object)
to cause to malfunction, especially computer hardware or software:Installing updates in the wrong order will bork all of your saved games.The fonts are borked when the site is accessed from a mobile device.
to mess up, ruin, break, botch, etc.:He said all of the wrong things during his interview and completely borked his chances of being invited back.Of course I borked my leg on the first day of our ski trip.
 

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There is no safe level of asbestos when inhaled. You defintely do not want to be sanding it.

I'm sure you won't find asbestos in OEM pads anymore, but there used to be lots of them made that way, and cheap imports may still be, especially old stock.
I see what you were saying, and I agree, I wouldn't want to expose myself to the dust by sanding pads that contain asbestos. I didn't read carefully and thought you were recommending against using aftermarket pads to replace the current ones.

On an aside, "There is no safe level of x substance" usually means that we know this substance can be harmful but we can't ethically do an experiment to find out exactly at what dose. The vast majority of people who got sick from asbestos had occupational exposures in contruction or shipbuilding and were exposed to a lot of it over a long period of time. So I still wouldn't worry about using brake pads with asbestos.
 

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2014 Suzuki DL1000A
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
@dravnx "You've borked the pads but don't spend $250 on new ones. You can get EBC Sintered for like $35."

Here's the way I feel about aftermarket. You have to compare the actual item to OEM or you just don't know who makes an acceptable replacement. For my 'ol Nissan I wouldn't buy Fram oil filters, because the gasket just didn't line up right, but WIX was on the money. These pads still have ~1mm from the wear mark so I hadn't bothered to address the issue before now. After the recommendations for "EBC Sintered", I think I will buy a set and compare to the OEM, which I can return if they're an acceptable match.

@mark444 "$250 for new pads.........???????? Or, new disc.....???"
If it was the full set of rotors, that's $663
  • Front Disk Brake, $219 ea x 2
  • Rear Disk Brake, $224
I have a cheap vernier caliper and I gauged the rotors at about 5.01 - 5.10 mm. They're serviceable up to 4.5 mm according to the Service Manual (front and back).
When I was thinking about $250 in new OEM pads, it seems like I should have these turned.
The other way at half the price, just changes my whole perspective on maintenance. haha.
And I prolly would not have bothered with the WS-40 to begin with.

@jettawreck "Stop worrying so much and just park the thing."

I dunno. I'm actually kinda liking this winterization process. I changed the anti-freeze, and picked up a few new gripes and lessons:
  • Lifting the tank to get to the coolant reservoir? That was a PITA, and took 2 hours with the below errors.
  • Service manual doesn't mention this, but online sources warn against mixing different coolants. However, after following the service manual instructions to drain coolant, I found the reservoir didn't drain with this procedure. Only after refilling, and performing the air-bleeding step (where the engine is started), was the reservoir drained--and mixed into the new coolant. Whatevers.
  • Had extra screws left over from the cowling. I figured out where these go because all of the gas tank screws are non-magnetic.
  • Performed this in the evening, and after the above hickups, and ended up working in the dark with headlamp (roadside repair simulation). I had a few small loose magnets in my tool kit which I used to keep track of screws and such. Holy frack. I found these on the rotor a few days later, grinding away. In the dark I guess I picked these up on a tool and somehow deposited them on the rotor. DOAH. Will not be using loose magnets in my tool kit again.
  • The cheap Walmart brand SuperTech pre-mixed 50/50 Ethylene Glycol-based anti-freese was cheap at $8 for 1G. My only gripe was it's damn yellow color was hard to see the level in the reservoir compared to the darker green which was in there before.
No EBC parts on eBay now, so I will keep a search for them.
Well. That's it. Thanks everyone for your input helping me keep my land speeder in good service.

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So wadda bout the brake dust on the caliper, disc, wheel and forks. If your concerned about asbestos be concerned about all the place it would be.

If the brake pads contained asbestos, you've already exposed yourself to the fibers when you removed the caliper/pads. Unless you are breaking out the grinder with an 80 grit cat's paw or flapper wheel and sanding all the material off the backing plate in a in a sealed closet you have nothing to worry about with a gently, quick scuffing with sand paper.
 
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