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In addition to the further penalties for distracted driving (texting, talking on phone, possibly drinking coffee or eating a sandwich) new rules for crosswalks... you now must wait until the pedestrian is off the road and on the sidewalk. passing a bicyclist you must give them 1 metre of space if possible and if you are in a car and give a cyclist a door prize you are looking at a $1000 fine.

sadly no regulation on the DUImobile e-bike scooters yet
 

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"give a cyclist a door prize" :green_lol::green_lol::green_lol:
I love the way you expressed that one
Almost brought tears to my eyes thanks for the laugh.
DannyC.
 

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In addition to the further penalties for distracted driving (texting, talking on phone, possibly drinking coffee or eating a sandwich) new rules for crosswalks... you now must wait until the pedestrian is off the road and on the sidewalk. passing a bicyclist you must give them 1 metre of space if possible and if you are in a car and give a cyclist a door prize you are looking at a $1000 fine.

sadly no regulation on the DUImobile e-bike scooters yet
What do you mean about "DUImobile e-bikes..."? I am aware that neither licence nor insurance are required, bicycle helmet is required, and over 16s only.
 

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... new rules for crosswalks... you now must wait until the pedestrian is off the road and on the sidewalk. ...
Please clarify this for me. I tried searching HTA on Ontario's
web sites, but they seemed to be frozen over.

I understand Ontario's Pedestrian Crosswalks, and my obligation to stop for pedestrians using them. I know that, when a pedestrian is crossing from my left to my right, I must wait for that pedestrian to clear ALL lanes and mount the sidewalk, and cannot go as soon as my lane is unblocked.

I have always been aware that, when a pedestrian is crossing from my right to my left on a two-way street, I must stay stopped until that pedestrian has crossed the line dividing traffic going my way from traffic approaching me.

Are you saying that now I must continue to stay stopped while that distant pedestrian crosses the opposing lane or lanes and finally mounts the sidewalk??? I would have treadmarks from three taxis on my T-shirt by then.

Here in Sarasota, I think of Ontario when I cross a street, because I generally "point my way to safety", using a stout steel cane, because Florida's drivers are not quite so courteous to pedestrians as Ontario's (are supposed to be).

I owe you a humourous aside for this long dull complaint. I was shopping in Tampa yesterday, and in the parking lot, I saw a small heap of very fine crushed ice, which was rapidly melting. Moving fast, I made a snowball, and threw it in the direction of a stranger, deliberating making the snowball land way short of her.

I asked her if she had been expecting a snowball assault when
she set out across that sweltering (39ºC) parking lot.
She said that was about the last thing she could expect.

Stay warm, y'all.
Keith

Yeah, yeah, where's the humour?
Watch the Alouettes tonight; that's where.
 

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Exactly.. they are popular with those who have lost a license :)
I'm a lawyer and I'm well aware of the use of e-bikes by the licenseless. Lots of those folks lost their licenses as a result of being convicted of a drinking and driving offence. They mistakenly believe that because no driver's license is required to ride an e-bike in Ontario that they can lawfully operate one. Sometimes it's fun to let them know they are wrong on that ;)
 

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I'm a lawyer and I'm well aware of the use of e-bikes by the licenseless. Lots of those folks lost their licenses as a result of being convicted of a drinking and driving offence. They mistakenly believe that because no driver's license is required to ride an e-bike in Ontario that they can lawfully operate one. Sometimes it's fun to let them know they are wrong on that ;)
True but it's not somethign that's actively enforced... i've never seen an ebike pulled over before..

I almost got into an accident with one today... pulled right out in front of me on busy 80km/hr road.. he was of course going 10 and I was going 90.. I love ABS :)
 

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I'm a lawyer and I'm well aware of the use of e-bikes by the licenseless. Lots of those folks lost their licenses as a result of being convicted of a drinking and driving offence. They mistakenly believe that because no driver's license is required to ride an e-bike in Ontario that they can lawfully operate one. Sometimes it's fun to let them know they are wrong on that ;)
Could you explain...in layman terms please ;) ... why if you have had your license suspended etc. would it matter if you operate a electric/less than 50cc scooter that doesn't require a license? you are still allowed to ride a bicycle correct?... I have a few friends who rode unlicensed scooters for their entire year suspension.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Please clarify this for me. I tried searching HTA on Ontario's
web sites, but they seemed to be frozen over.

I understand Ontario's Pedestrian Crosswalks, and my obligation to stop for pedestrians using them. I know that, when a pedestrian is crossing from my left to my right, I must wait for that pedestrian to clear ALL lanes and mount the sidewalk, and cannot go as soon as my lane is unblocked.

I have always been aware that, when a pedestrian is crossing from my right to my left on a two-way street, I must stay stopped until that pedestrian has crossed the line dividing traffic going my way from traffic approaching me.

Are you saying that now I must continue to stay stopped while that distant pedestrian crosses the opposing lane or lanes and finally mounts the sidewalk??? I would have treadmarks from three taxis on my T-shirt by then.

Here in Sarasota, I think of Ontario when I cross a street, because I generally "point my way to safety", using a stout steel cane, because Florida's drivers are not quite so courteous to pedestrians as Ontario's (are supposed to be).

I owe you a humourous aside for this long dull complaint. I was shopping in Tampa yesterday, and in the parking lot, I saw a small heap of very fine crushed ice, which was rapidly melting. Moving fast, I made a snowball, and threw it in the direction of a stranger, deliberating making the snowball land way short of her.

I asked her if she had been expecting a snowball assault when
she set out across that sweltering (39ºC) parking lot.
She said that was about the last thing she could expect.

Stay warm, y'all.
Keith

Yeah, yeah, where's the humour?
Watch the Alouettes tonight; that's where.
Quick answer - yes they must be off the road
Could you explain...in layman terms please ;) ... why if you have had your license suspended etc. would it matter if you operate a electric/less than 50cc scooter that doesn't require a license? you are still allowed to ride a bicycle correct?... I have a few friends who rode unlicensed scooters for their entire year suspension.
It's still considered a motor vehicle (even a lawn tractor is covered)
 

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True but it's not somethign that's actively enforced... i've never seen an ebike pulled over before..

I almost got into an accident with one today... pulled right out in front of me on busy 80km/hr road.. he was of course going 10 and I was going 90.. I love ABS :)

Hah! You need to be out later at night. Police stops of e-bikes and the criminal charges that follow tend to happen closer to last call.
 

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Could you explain...in layman terms please ;) ... why if you have had your license suspended etc. would it matter if you operate a electric/less than 50cc scooter that doesn't require a license? you are still allowed to ride a bicycle correct?... I have a few friends who rode unlicensed scooters for their entire year suspension.
Keith is in the right ballpark, but not quite correct. When a person is convicted of drinking and driving the court makes two orders regarding their ability to drive. There is a driving prohibition AND a licence suspension.

In Canada, upon conviction for a drink/drive offence an offender is prohibited from driving under the Criminal Code for a set period of time. The minimum for a first offence is one year.

At the same time as the court orders the Criminal Code prohibition (...prohibiting the offender from operating a motor vehicle on any street, road, highway or other public place...) by operation of the Highway Traffic Act in Ontario, an offender's licence is suspended for a period of time. For a first offence the minimum period is one year.

For example, for a first time offender (call him Bob) on an over 80 offence with no aggravating circumstances, Bob will be fined $1000.00, plus victim fine surcharge, and be prohibited from driving (...prohibiting the offender from operating a motor vehicle on any street, road, highway or other public place...) for one year under the Criminal Code. Bob will also have his licence suspended under the (Ontario) Highway Traffic Act for one year.

In order to have his licence reinstated after that year Bob will have to take a Back on Track program administered by the MTO, pay any outstanding fines, and have an ignition interlock device installed on any motor vehicle he drives. Bob can choose to wait an additional year and avoid the ignition interlock device but will still have to pay all fines and take the Back on Track program.

If Bob does none of those things the Criminal Code driving prohibition will expire after one year, but the licence suspension will remain in effect until he follows the reinstatement requirements.

To get back to the original question.... the answer partly rides on the definition of motor vehicle under two operating laws, the Criminal Code (federal) and the Highway Traffic Act (provincial), and partly on the difference between the Criminal Code prohibition and the Highway Traffic Act licence suspension.

The Criminal Code contains a broad definition of Motor Vehicle that essentially includes anything not driven by muscle power. An e-bike has a motor, and is therefore a motor vehicle under the Criminal Code.

Under the Highway Traffic Act e-bikes are exempted from the licencing regime, and are an exception to the definition of motor vehicle. Under this (ill-conceived) pilot project, persons over 16, without a driver's licence, insurance, any training, or a functioning brain, as long as they wear a bicycle helmet, may operate an e-bike in most of the same places a bicycle can go.

In summary, Bob, with a suspended licence can ride an e-bike, but if he rides it during the one year period of his Criminal Code prohibition he can be charged with driving while prohibited - judges like to send people to jail for that.

And, people who ride e-bikes after drinking can be charged with drinking and driving offences, just as if they were driving their cars or motorcycles, or anything else not propelled by muscular power.
 

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That's a great explanation, thank you!
You're welcome. Sadly, it's an explanation I have to go through, usually several times and in much greater detail, far too often with clients.
 

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new rules for crosswalks... you now must wait until the pedestrian is off the road and on the sidewalk.
This is/has been the law in Alberta, my mother is a driving instructor, and didnt know this! lmao.

I just got my class 6 (at 39 yrs old) and when I showed her that part, she was in disbelief. I guess it never hurts to review the manuals over decade or so.
 

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