StromTrooper banner

1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
New guy here w/an '04 DL1000.
Been running 91 so far, although the owners manual says 87.
I'm usually stuck with 10% ethanol in it.
What do you run & why?
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
The same question has been asked dozens of times. Use 87 in North America unless your engine pings. If it pings, you're better off having your carbon deposits cleaned but going to a higher octane is a possibility. Using a higher octane than necessary to run without pinging is a waste of money octane wise.

For those worried about higher octane fuel having a better additive package, there are fuels tested to have a quality additive package in regular grade. Top Tier Gasoline
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
87 or 91 octane fuel?

New guy here, '04 DL1000 all OEM mechanically.
Been running 91 w/10% ethanol but noticed the manual says 87.
What do you run & why?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
508 Posts
It all depends on where you buy gas. In general I use 87 with 10% ethanol and get good results. There are however certain gas stations, with good customer traffic, where I get misfires with the 87 gas. Every 4th or 5th fill up I will use the next grade up (no real reason). I believe that the idea of using high grade gas because it is ethanol free is false. I live in Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada and the same tanker appears to deliver gas to different companies.

My 2009 Vee is 100% Suzuki. If you are using after market parts the above might not apply to you.

Ideas will differ,

Brian


New guy here, '04 DL1000.
Been running 91 w/10% ethanol but noticed the manual says 87.
What do you run & why?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
If the bike is designed to run on 87 octane then run 87. If a vehicle is designed to run with a higher octane, using a lower octane may result in pinging but more likely the EFI will retarded the ignition just enough to avoid pinging. The result is degraded performance as the throttle calls for more acceleration the EFI computer is attempting to slow the rate of acceleration. This wastes gas. Using the proper octane in vehicles that require the higher octane will deliver a slight increase in mpg that will more than offset the increased cost per gallon.
For example, my Goldwing requires 91 octane per the owners manual. It will run adequately on 87 octane. The mileage on 87 octane averages 42 mpg on the highway. Filling the tank with the recommended 91 octane will increase the mileage to nearly 46 mpg. The cost per mile is better with the higher cost gas so going cheap at the pump is detrimental in the long run. You bike is designed to run on 87 octane. The above increase in mileage will not be realized as the EFI computer is not trying to process conflicting inputs, it's running normally. Running 91 octane will result in unburned gas being pushed out the exhaust wasting gas and decreasing the mpg.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
The Stroms do not have a knock sensor. The computer won't compensate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Octane number is just an indication of resistance to self ignition. Despite all allusions to the contrary by some gas companies, there usually is no difference between 87 octane and 91 octane other than that. So, using 91 octane doesn't necessarily get you a "cleaner" or "better" gasoline. If you have a high compression engine that requires high octane, the manufacturer will clearly state that. The DL1K runs very well on 87 octane. No need (or benefit) to use anything other than 87 octane unless you like giving your money away.

Gustavo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
I'll be running 87 octane (100% gasoline) in my new DL650A. Fortunately, 100% gasoline is widely available in all 3 grades (87, 89, 91 octane) in my area. I know I have less trouble with 100% gasoline in my lawnmowers that sit for long periods of time without being started.

I believe the new DL1K's have a requirement for 91 octane fuel.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,224 Posts
I have been putting 94 ethanol free gas in my bike for years. Since i work from home full time now my bike tends to sit a lot more. Weeks at a time sometimes and i don't want Ethanol in there dragging in moisture. I also find my bike gets better mileage with 94 over the cheaper gas.

If they sold 87 ethanol free i would consider switching though but i guess those days are long gone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
If they sold 87 ethanol free i would consider switching though but i guess those days are long gone.
A little bit of Stabil in the tank when you park it will solve that problem. For about 4 years the DL1K was used my "Mexican" bike. I took 2-3 trips a year in late fall through early spring, then the bike sat in NM until the next year. Never had a problem, no rust, no hesitation, no nothing. You just showed back up 8 month later and it fired on first crank. I don't know if that isn't more a testament about how reliable the DL1K is than the inoffensiveness of E-10 fuel with Stabil, but it worked. :thumbup:

Gustavo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,428 Posts
If the bike is designed to run on 87 octane then run 87. If a vehicle is designed to run with a higher octane, using a lower octane may result in pinging but more likely the EFI will retarded the ignition just enough to avoid pinging. The result is degraded performance as the throttle calls for more acceleration the EFI computer is attempting to slow the rate of acceleration. This wastes gas. Using the proper octane in vehicles that require the higher octane will deliver a slight increase in mpg that will more than offset the increased cost per gallon.
For example, my Goldwing requires 91 octane per the owners manual. It will run adequately on 87 octane. The mileage on 87 octane averages 42 mpg on the highway. Filling the tank with the recommended 91 octane will increase the mileage to nearly 46 mpg. The cost per mile is better with the higher cost gas so going cheap at the pump is detrimental in the long run. You bike is designed to run on 87 octane. The above increase in mileage will not be realized as the EFI computer is not trying to process conflicting inputs, it's running normally. Running 91 octane will result in unburned gas being pushed out the exhaust wasting gas and decreasing the mpg.
What model/year is your Gold Wing? Both my '01 and '05 Wings used 87 octane gasoline?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
I have always put in the highest octane fuel I can get just because I do not want to deal with the potential mechanical issues with Ethanol degraded gas, AND because I refuse to buy into the environmental wing nut premise that Ethanol blended fuels are the ay of the future and so good for us!! Bullship.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
Ethanol is what provides much of the octane rating. The AKI of pure ethanol is 99.15. I can see using higher octane fuel if it is ethanol free, but if all grades have ethanol, spending more makes no sense. The octane rating of all grades of E10 is just about the anti knock index.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
As a "general rule" I have found that the premium or highest octane gas and most gas stations do NOT have ethanol added. Is usually says at the pump. I use the Top Tier gas stations where this is the case. As I mentioned, I buy the premium gas specifically to avoid the Ethanol for specific reasons.
 

·
FORUM GODFATHER.....R.I.P. PAT
Joined
·
38,103 Posts
That needed to be mentioned. Having ethanol in regular but not in premium is a valid reason that is probably not an option for many people here. I can't get ethanol free fuel anywhere near me and that's true for most of the USA population.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
276 Posts
Just did a bit of research and discovered that RON 91 octane is actually PON 87 octane fuel here in the U.S.
Look at the sticker on the inside of the right cover of your Goldwing (the one you remove to check the oil). Octane specs are printed there.
 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top