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Discussion Starter #1
From what I have been told Europe graduates the cost of bikes by cc size. Any thing over a 650cc is much more to buy/insure. Besides, I have driven all the current 800 dual sport bikes and do not "really" notice that much difference in power. I had a bmw 800 GS and would NEVER trade it for my 650. If you go "off road" than the better suspension offered by bmw, triumph, etc., would have an advantage. For most the v-strom is a very good bike for the money.
Oh! This is kind of like the Jeep guys. They buy a Rubican for going going "off road" and then 99.7% of the time it goes to the office and back...dreaming of the trip to Alaska that never happens because the kids need braces, mom what new carpet, and they all want to "upgrade" to the new "faster" Iphone so it can down load .00000000000000000000000000000000003 percent faster and it is .36 ounces lighter!!
I just keep thinging about the guy who went around the world on his Vespa. Hmmmmm.
 

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May I correct you? Being ex-pat from the UK, having lived in the US for many years and now reside in Zurich (Switzerland) insurance is based on the following criteria: Age, number of years riding, number of no claims years, marital status, employment status and type, motorcycle purpose (commuter/ SD&P), points on license, make of motorcycle and type. Cost of parts to repair then the cc. I've never paid more than £140 per year for my VZR1800R, fully comp. Now Switzerland, not being part of the EU has by-passed all that and charge whatever they like, typically for my V strom I would have to pay @ $900 per year, so I still have it registered and insured in the UK for £102 per year! :fineprint:
 

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From what I have been told Europe graduates the cost of bikes by cc size. Any thing over a 650cc is much more to buy/insure. Besides, I have driven all the current 800 dual sport bikes and do not "really" notice that much difference in power. I had a bmw 800 GS and would NEVER trade it for my 650. If you go "off road" than the better suspension offered by bmw, triumph, etc., would have an advantage. For most the v-strom is a very good bike for the money.
Oh! This is kind of like the Jeep guys. They buy a Rubican for going going "off road" and then 99.7% of the time it goes to the office and back...dreaming of the trip to Alaska that never happens because the kids need braces, mom what new carpet, and they all want to "upgrade" to the new "faster" Iphone so it can down load .00000000000000000000000000000000003 percent faster and it is .36 ounces lighter!!
I just keep thinging about the guy who went around the world on his Vespa. Hmmmmm.
:confused:
 

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I should also add that the UK is the largest market for superbikes (anything over 750cc) and most of Europe seem content running around on scooters, even here, where they put on winter tyres. I did see a guy riding his KTM up the mountain last week with 20cm of snow and 20 f degrees but with spike ice tyres, he was having a blast on the tight little roads.......rather him than me!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I stand...corrected!!

I guess my friend, who lived in Europe, gave me some wrong advice.
 

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May I correct you? Being ex-pat from the UK, having lived in the US for many years and now reside in Zurich (Switzerland) insurance is based on the following criteria: Age, number of years riding, number of no claims years, marital status, employment status and type, motorcycle purpose (commuter/ SD&P), points on license, make of motorcycle and type. Cost of parts to repair then the cc. I've never paid more than £140 per year for my VZR1800R, fully comp. Now Switzerland, not being part of the EU has by-passed all that and charge whatever they like, typically for my V strom I would have to pay @ $900 per year, so I still have it registered and insured in the UK for £102 per year! :fineprint:
Where I live, engine displacement (not HP) makes a BIG difference in how much insurance costs. People riding docile cruisers pay significantly more insurance than the kids with 600cc sport bikes who regularly annihilate themselves. 650 is the sweet spot for insurance here in CA.
 

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Where I live, engine displacement (not HP) makes a BIG difference in how much insurance costs. People riding docile cruisers pay significantly more insurance than the kids with 600cc sport bikes who regularly annihilate themselves. 650 is the sweet spot for insurance here in CA.
I would say they kinda got that backwards, let's face it cruiser riders then to be older, ahem, I mean wiser, oh never mind you know what I mean. I remember in my youth riding my first GSXR 1100, I would redline every gear after 1st.
I would hate to own a Rocket 111 where you live then.
 

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I'm with progressive in WY. I'm told by a rep I spoke to that they classify bikes by type and displacement- standard, sport, cruiser, etc. the vstrom and my buddies bandit 1200 are in the same class: standard. The cruiser classes break up at 750 cc and the sport bikes are at 600 cc. So, maybe it's different per company, per state, per country :)
 

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I wonder what any of it has to do with the new 1000?
But aside from that I'm sure you can go to any 800 Tiger forum or 800 GS forum and have them tell you what dog your 650 is compared to their bike.:green_lol:
 

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I wonder what any of it has to do with the new 1000?
But aside from that I'm sure you can go to any 800 Tiger forum or 800 GS forum and have them tell you what dog your 650 is compared to their bike.:green_lol:
Yup, their gourmet bikes would be less reliable on average. ;)
 

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I'm with progressive in WY. I'm told by a rep I spoke to that they classify bikes by type and displacement- standard, sport, cruiser, etc. the vstrom and my buddies bandit 1200 are in the same class: standard. The cruiser classes break up at 750 cc and the sport bikes are at 600 cc. So, maybe it's different per company, per state, per country :)
As stupid as it sounds, here are the rate classifications in BC:

311 (111–400 cc)
312 (401–750 cc)
313 (751–1150 cc)
314 (over 1150 cc)

I pay top dollar for my ST1300, and the kids on 600 sport bikes are paying the same (with allowance for age) as my wee. We have a state-owned monopoly for vehicle insurance that was supposed to save people money, but now generates revenue for the government.
 

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screw 800cc. Just give me shaft drive on the Weestrom :headbang:

What happened to the days when you could get shaft drive on nearly any sized bike from Japan. From 400cc to 1000cc?
 

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screw 800cc. Just give me shaft drive on the Weestrom :headbang:

What happened to the days when you could get shaft drive on nearly any sized bike from Japan. From 400cc to 1000cc?
Same thing that happened to pubic hair in porn movies, just gone.:green_lol:
 

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What happened to the days when you could get shaft drive on nearly any sized bike from Japan. From 400cc to 1000cc?
I'd rather have a drive belt. They are quite, light, clean, don't require adjustment and last much longer than chain.
 

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I'd rather have a drive belt. They are quite, light, clean, don't require adjustment and last much longer than chain.
If they aren't properly protected they are suseptible to damage from rocks, glass shards ect.

I still prefer shaft even with the weight and power penalty. Change oil every once in a blue moon and ride till the rest of the bike falls apart. The Japenese can actually build a solid shaft drive system. Like I said pretty much every UJM "back in the day" had a shaft driven model.
 

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The wee is the first chain-driven motorcycle that I've owned since 1980, so I tend to agree with you. But my riding buddy's wife is riding a F800ST with belt drive. I think she has something like 40k on it over 7 years with no apparent wear or issues. If you are sticking to the pavement, a belt drive can be a good option.
 

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I'm getting well over 40,000 miles on a chain simply by giving it a shot of lube every time I fill the tank and after every rain ride (and that is about the total of the maintenance my chains need and get.)

..Tom
 
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