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Discussion Starter #1
Just pulled off a Spring Break trip on my 'strom. 2300 miles living off the bike with about 500 miles of that on dirt and gravel road. We were chasing hot springs in central Nevada:













Bike was awesome, not a single problem- loaded with a lot of camping gear- returned about 46 mpg total (including riding dirt) trip was great. If you're interested in details I just wrote a full ride report at another forum: 10 Hot Springs in 7 Days: Dodging Naked Hippies in Central Nevada - ADVrider
 

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Nice! :thumbup:

I have a week off starting April 20th. Hopefully heading to Colorado Springs doing the same type of trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice! :thumbup:

I have a week off starting April 20th. Hopefully heading to Colorado Springs doing the same type of trip.
Hey D.T. - I just looked at my hot springs book for Colorado, there are some out your way. It seems that most are developed hot springs- but there are a few wild ones.

I'm considering Colorado for my June ride- so many good roads.
 

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Awesome trip, bajarambler! Looks like a great way to spend 7 days on a VStrom!
Cowbell- it was awesome! We camped every night except once- the 'strom hauled it all without a complaint, even over really rocky bumpy dirt roads. It's a great bike, I was very happy with it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Really enjoyed the trip report.

Thanks for taking the time to share it.

You did a great job!

Happy trails.
Thanks Kbetts! It took much more time and energy than I thought it would but I'm happy it's there if can inspire somebody to get out on the road with their bike. I also had trouble finding lots of pics of those particular springs from a moto-trip perspective so I hope I filled that informational hole a little bit.
 

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Great trip! and you passed through my back yard. I do like the wide open places NV offers and the hot springs are a bonus.
 

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Thanks Kbetts! It took much more time and energy than I thought it would but I'm happy it's there if can inspire somebody to get out on the road with their bike. I also had trouble finding lots of pics of those particular springs from a moto-trip perspective so I hope I filled that informational hole a little bit.
I had the same difficulties writing ride reports in the past. This last trip I ended up blogging my report each day. It went MUCH better than trying to re-create the trip at the end of it. I also had several dozen people following my trip by the end of the second week and making comments which provided another insight to what I was personally experiencing. One lady had taught school 30 years prior at a remote Native American reservation school I described. It gave me different eyes to see what I was experiencing.

As you have found, some people even go to the spots you've described to visit it for themselves. In fact, I plan on visiting the area next spring and will try to find time to visit one of your sites. So thanks again for the effort and in doing so adding to the motorcycle community.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Bike mods I completed for this trip.

I followed the advice of this forum for many mods I added to the bike before I took off on the trip- I was a lurker and a seeker (used the search function) and the info here really helped. A couple of things I did on the advice of this forum:

1. Heated Clothing: I bought a Warm and Safe jacket and socks and double remote Heat Troller. The jacket was awesome, the Heat Troller was awesome, the socks I'm going to give an OK rating. Here's why. Since I did the socks without the heated pants, I had to use the long split wire to connect them with my jacket. The long wires run down your leg and they're kind of a pain to set up through your leathers- also, and most importantly, they can unplug themselves and then one, or both might not work. Now when they do work, they are so toasty and nice- I'm thinking I'm going to just buy the pants to get around the cord issue.

2. Heated Grips: I installed the Oxford Premium Sport riding grips. Easy install, easy wiring hook up. I followed the threads here that told me how to shave off parts of the throttle tube to make them fit. I was worried about the super glue going off too fast but it wasn't an issue for me (although I will say, be careful when applying the super glue on the throttle tube side- tilt your bars so the grip is angled toward the floor so excess glue won't run down into your throttle tube - gluing it closed :jawdrop: did that on my girl's bike, a quick liberal dousing of acetone saved the day). Grips worked great and were used often.

3. Eastern Beaver Products: I used the accessory plug tail to install a double usb socket, I also bought the heated grips wiring harness and connected it to a 12v socket (I ran the Oxfords directly back to the battery) and I bought the headlight relay kit with the one light cutoff switch on the advice of posts I read by Greywolf. I used all of my heated gear, charged an iphone and never once had a dead battery issue. I'm going to push the issue by adding heated pants to my electrical load- we'll see what happens (any advice about that?).

4. Richland Rick: Accessory shelf- mounted my 12v socket, double usb socket, headlight cutoff switch and Signal Dynamics Heads Up Voltage LED onto it. There's a nest of wires under there now but it all worked great and it really organized my cockpit. Plus the switch and light look cool. The shelf was reasonably simple to install. Getting the second of the two mounting screws through the shelf and triple tree is difficult but do-able.

5. Precision moto-racks soft luggage racks: These were great! Lee makes an excellent product and if you live in San Diego he will (at least he did for me) install them for you at his house/shop. They kept my bags off any hot or moving parts and they look great.

6. Nelson-Rigg Survivor Series Waterproof soft bags: I did not hold back, coddle, or take it easy on these things. I cranked the straps as hard as possible, the bags got bumped over rocky, dirt roads and covered in dust and they did a great job- no tears, strap failures or rips in the fabric. I cut small plastic waste baskets down a couple of inches short, added webbing straps to them and inserted them into the bags. I can't even begin to tell you how useful those buckets are around camp- I used one to shower with once and on a couple occasions it became a beer cooler. I like the bags, will use them again and endorse them. BTW: watched my brother crash when he dabbed his foot down going 5mph and it got sucked back and under his hard bag on his Triumph Explorer- pretty scary, I'm sure this could happen with the soft bags but I'd take a soft bag on top of my leg over a hard bag any day.

7. Pilot road 3 back tire, original Battlewing on front: Unbelievably both tires did not get punctured or torn open on some of the very flinty roads we were on. In fact, the front, with 13,000 miles on it still looks serviceable. The back Pilot road is a little squared off but still has lots of tread and life in it. I ran mine at recommended psi which was a bit harsh on the dirt and I had no problems. My brother on his Triumph ran the same Pilots front and back and he loved them.

8. MadStad bracket and windscreen- worked great.

9. Sheepskin seat cover- won't ride without it.

10. Extra gas in fuel bottles and Wolfman holders: Never needed them- these fricking bikes have awesome range. It was, however, nice to know they were there.

11. Wolfman Expedition duffel: I've got my packing system all figured out now and I know what piece of equipment goes in exactly which bag- the Wolfman bag was absolutely perfect. It carried my tent, pad, go-kot, kermit chair, and off bike shoes which allowed me to keep my Bestem Top Box (cheap and great) fairly empty so I could grab beer, ice, a hamburger etc and jam it in there while on the move. I'm glad I bought the Wolfman it worked well.

12. Frame Sliders/Acerbis handguards: Bike protection - I went the Greywolf route and skipped the big engine bars. I never fell but I was fairly certain the Acerbis (fairly easy install) the passenger peg brackets and the SV frame sliders would prevent most damage- the frame sliders allow you to rest your legs on them while riding so you look like you're on a hog while sticking your legs out running down the road.

That's about it for now. Oh yeah, the JetBoil is fricking awesome.

Thanks again for the help.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the ride report and follow up - can you pass along the brand of the frame sliders?

Thanks,

Keith
I bought the sliders from SV Racing- they were easy to install and I'm not exactly what I'd classify as a "handy" person (though I can follow directions pretty well). I'm happy with them.
 

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Great thread! Utah is presently a favorite ride for me, need to move out there to really see it all. Been through Nevada, cedar city to Yosemite. Presently living in MN. Were you using the stock tires and if so, how were they in the dirt? I'm new to the wee, been riding a BMW r1200rt the last ten years.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Utah is beautiful- riding through Zion Nat. Park is a must do on anyone's list. I was on stock front tire and a Pilot Road 3 on the back. I kept them aired up to spec even on dirt road and they worked well. We lucked out and no flats or tears.

I'd use the Pilot 3s again- they'll never feel like knobby dirt bike tires but we were only riding gravel roads with a couple short, true off road sections (sand, silt and off road to see some sites) - and the 3s were great on the highway twisty bits. If you've ridden a dirt bike, you know that big heavy bikes don't feel good off road- the vstrom is a good street-biased compromise. Plus it's a mule, it'll haul your stuff.
 
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