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Sorry to hear about SECoda... condolences to all! What is it like these days to ride with a chain? How much of a headache is it to keep up with?
Not too bad, as long as she can cook.
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Sorry to hear about SECoda... condolences to all! What is it like these days to ride with a chain? How much of a headache is it to keep up with?
Chain maintenance sucks if you ride in the rain a lot. It poured most of the winter here and I commuted on it daily. I was cleaning the chain (not just oiling it) at least 1-2 times per week.

Coming from a shaft drive (I saw your other thread)...If you intend to be an all weather rider, I doubt that you’ll be thrilled with it, but that’s just my two cents. If you’re just going to be a fair weather occasional rider...I don’t think you’ll have an issue with the chain.

Given any thought to the Super Tenere? If I could have found a used second gen (‘14+) locally...I’d have likely gone that route.

That being said...it is a lot of fun. That and people that say the DL1000 is slow must split their time between that and a sport bike. It is very peppy.
 

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Chain maintenance sucks if you ride in the rain a lot. It poured most of the winter here and I commuted on it daily. I was cleaning the chain (not just oiling it) at least 1-2 times per week.

Coming from a shaft drive (I saw your other thread)...If you intend to be an all weather rider, I doubt that you’ll be thrilled with it, but that’s just my two cents. If you’re just going to be a fair weather occasional rider...I don’t think you’ll have an issue with the chain.

Given any thought to the Super Tenere? If I could have found a used second gen (‘14+) locally...I’d have likely gone that route.

That being said...it is a lot of fun. That and people that say the DL1000 is slow must split their time between that and a sport bike. It is very peppy.
I have two chain drive bikes. I have had shaft drive before and loved them. BUT, if something in the shaft drive goes wrong it is usually a difficult and expensive repair compared to a chain. Lately there has been a lot of talk of a lot of BMW's have a final drive failure. I know, people write more about bad news than good, but still I would consider the prospect of a failed final drive.

I know if I put on a Scottoiler I would never have to clean the chain again, rarely adjust it and only change it for every 2nd or 3rd front sprocket - every 50,000 kms or so. If I was still riding 10,000+ kms per year they'd both have the Scottoilers now, but I don't anymore, so I just lube them occasionally and call it a day.

Shaft drive would not be a factor in my decision to buy a bike - but I would give it some thought if the bike was a BMW. Maybe there is some preventative maintenance to save the Bimmer final drive. I don't know.

Cheers,
Glenn
 

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I have two chain drive bikes. I have had shaft drive before and loved them. BUT, if something in the shaft drive goes wrong it is usually a difficult and expensive repair compared to a chain. Lately there has been a lot of talk of a lot of BMW's have a final drive failure. I know, people write more about bad news than good, but still I would consider the prospect of a failed final drive.

I know if I put on a Scottoiler I would never have to clean the chain again, rarely adjust it and only change it for every 2nd or 3rd front sprocket - every 50,000 kms or so. If I was still riding 10,000+ kms per year they'd both have the Scottoilers now, but I don't anymore, so I just lube them occasionally and call it a day.

Shaft drive would not be a factor in my decision to buy a bike - but I would give it some thought if the bike was a BMW. Maybe there is some preventative maintenance to save the Bimmer final drive. I don't know.

Cheers,
Glenn
That is one of the reasons...despite the hassle of the additional maintenance...that I opted to go with a chain drive. I figured that repairs would be cheaper and if I broke down away from home...odds would be better of getting that fixed on short notice wherever I happen to be.
 

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I have two chain drive bikes. I have had shaft drive before and loved them. BUT, if something in the shaft drive goes wrong it is usually a difficult and expensive repair compared to a chain. Lately there has been a lot of talk of a lot of BMW's have a final drive failure. I know, people write more about bad news than good, but still I would consider the prospect of a failed final drive.

I know if I put on a Scottoiler I would never have to clean the chain again, rarely adjust it and only change it for every 2nd or 3rd front sprocket - every 50,000 kms or so. If I was still riding 10,000+ kms per year they'd both have the Scottoilers now, but I don't anymore, so I just lube them occasionally and call it a day.

Shaft drive would not be a factor in my decision to buy a bike - but I would give it some thought if the bike was a BMW. Maybe there is some preventative maintenance to save the Bimmer final drive. I don't know.

Cheers,
Glenn
I have been reading and watching You Tube videos to learn about chain care and best methods to take care of Chain drive. What oilers do you recommend? What have you tried. I like this one a great deal...https://www.webbikeworld.com/cobrra-nemo-2-chain-oiler-review/
 

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I have been reading and watching You Tube videos to learn about chain care and best methods to take care of Chain drive. What oilers do you recommend? What have you tried. I like this one a great deal...https://www.webbikeworld.com/cobrra-nemo-2-chain-oiler-review/
I lube the chain every 500 miles or so. I use DuPont chain saver mostly because it's cheap and available. Turn the back wheel by hand and spray the bottom run of the chain. Wiping off the excess with a paper towel also cleans it. Takes about 5 minutes and yea I've done it on trips, no big deal.

The chain rarely needs adjustments one thing though is to run it on the loose side. Too tight puts stress on the countershaft bearing. It's generally accepted that the Suzuki spec is too tight. Me I adjust so pushing the bottom run up just barely makes contact with the swingarm. Works out to be a bit more than an inch slack.

Don't be scared of chain drive. It's lighter and the most efficient power transfer. Chains don't break unless severely neglected. Maintenance is easy.
 

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I have been reading and watching You Tube videos to learn about chain care and best methods to take care of Chain drive. What oilers do you recommend? What have you tried. I like this one a great deal...https://www.webbikeworld.com/cobrra-nemo-2-chain-oiler-review/
I have never had a chain oiler, but it's always one of the next things I want to buy. The Cobrra Nemo 2 is from my adopted country, Slovakia, so it definitely checks the European quality box. However, I would really need an automatic setup because I would surely forget to depressurize the thing and always have oil on the floor. My first choice was always the vacuum controlled Scott Oiler, but lots of folks here swear by the Tutoro oiler. Watch out if you buy on Amazon. There seem to be a bunch of Chinese knockoffs of something and a few folks have had problems with them.
 

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Chain maintenance sucks if you ride in the rain a lot. It poured most of the winter here and I commuted on it daily. I was cleaning the chain (not just oiling it) at least 1-2 times per week.
...
@Oldiebut goodie

Chain maintenance sucks when you do stuff you don't need to do. Apparently most instructions given on how to "maintain" a chain are not based on any kind of fact.

I ride over 50,000 km per year. I ride all year round, rain or shine, on highways, city streets, backroads, unpaved roads, roads that are salted or brined.(but try and avoid roads with snow on them.)

I never clean my chain. I lube with every tank of gas and after every ride in the rain. This takes less than 20 seconds when the bike is on the centerstand.

I have worked up to it over 560,000 km of Strom riding and now I can can confidentially expect my chains to last over 80,000 km / 50,000 miles.

..Tom
 

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I have never had a chain oiler, but it's always one of the next things I want to buy. The Cobrra Nemo 2 is from my adopted country, Slovakia, so it definitely checks the European quality box. However, I would really need an automatic setup because I would surely forget to depressurize the thing and always have oil on the floor. My first choice was always the vacuum controlled Scott Oiler, but lots of folks here swear by the Tutoro oiler. Watch out if you buy on Amazon. There seem to be a bunch of Chinese knockoffs of something and a few folks have had problems with them.
I have the Gidibi Cobrra knockoff US $17.48 62% OFF|Update Motorcycle Chain Lubricator Oiler Chain Oiler Motorcycle Lubrication System For Honda Yamaha Suzuki Kawasaki DUCATI KTM|Chain Sets| | - AliExpress
Never leaks, never need to depressurize, I just make sure I've got at least 10 minutes of riding ahead of me when I give it a 90 degree twist. This usually dispenses the 90 weight oil directly on chain over 3-5 minutes.
Took > 1 month to arrive. A good addition, made easy chain service even easier yet. I never "clean"the chain either, 95% of my riding is on the pavement.
 

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Good info. Thanks Gristle.
 

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For years I have read all this chain stuff and wonder how I got along without any of this aftermarket stuff. Back when I raced off road we used what is now called "roller chain", which is just chain without O-rings. We had to clean it after every race and oil it. Then we got a gift from heaven: O-ring chains. With these the factory "vacum packed" the lube inside the rollers and sealed it in, and kept the dirt out, with O-rings. Other than wiping off the dirt and giving a very little lube to the outside once in a while these chains lasted a long, long time.
I see people now going overboard trying to over oil and over clean these marvels of modern engineering. They do crazy stuff like spraying all sorts of solvents on the chain to clean it! These solvents can do more damage than good! If they are of the wrong chemical composition they can damage the o-rings and shorten the life of the chain. Some people use power washers on them! That is sinful! You blast wanted past the o-rings, wash out the factory lube and rust the chain from the inside. Bad!
Your car likely (like 99% now do) has sealed wheel bearings that work just like your o-ring chain. Those sealed wheel bearings will more often than not last the life of the vehicle if you don't beat them to death in pot holes. You never lube those bearings, they don't need it. I have taken them apart with well over 100,000 miles on them and the original lube is still inside. Very few wheel bearings fail due to lack of lubrication (but it can in very rare cases happen). Your chain is the same way, sealed in lube, lasts the life of the chain if all goes well and the owner doesn't wash out the lube with a power washer or harsh solvents in a vain attempt to "service" that chain.
Its all very simple: WIth a rag wipe off the outer part of the chain ever 400-500 miles or so depending on environmental conditions (a.k.a. "when it gets dirty"!). Put a very light coat of a good quality chain lube on it after riding (not before!) just to keep the outside of the chain from rusting and to give a little lube to the outside of the o-rings. Use a quality lube that is made for o-ring chains. Do NOT use WD-40 on a chain! WD-40 is not a proper lube for anything! Its mostly solvents made to clean up rust and displace water. Read up on what it was originally made for (removing rust from early Atlas missiles) .
( WD-40,WD-40 inventors | edubilla.com
The properties that make it a good solvent may also make it harmful to some 0-rings.
Do you really need a chain oiler? Some swear by them while others like me just smile. One of my old off road bikes had one built in from the factory but that was decades ago before we had o-ring chains. Of course the people who make these devices want you to lust for them and shell out your money for one. After all, its how they make money. And, they won't hurt anything. I have always thought about how chains like to sling off oil so much and wondered how it was going to be practical to just drip oil on the chain while it was spinning! I oil my chain and then don't ride it for hours or even days, giving that sticky Bel-Ray stuff (my favorite from racing days) time to set up and stick well.

Whatever you want to do to your chain is your business. I do, however, hate for people to waste time and money on things they don't need. I also hate to see people kill a good chain by over loving it and doing too much to it. Just use common sense and get the facts. Don't fall for everything you read on the internet and always question anything a company tells you while trying to sell you one of their products. If you want to swear your oiler is the greatest thing since sex then go for it! (its not, BTW). But do keep; the external part of your chain clean. Give it a light coat of oil to prevent rust. Remember all that sticky oil is actually more likely to allow dirt and sand to stick to your chain and actually can cause it to wear more!

As for shaft drive vrs. chain: I have owned both and put lots of miles on them. I have run chains off road on motocross, hare scrambles, flat-track, trials, and more. I have run both roller and o-ring chains on road and dual-sport bikes. I have owned several shaft driven bikes. (and yes, you do have to maintain shafts/final drives).. Forget that "no maintenance shaft fable!). My favorite drive system is a good o-ring chain. WIth minimal proper care they will last tens of thousands of trouble free miles. Shafts will last too but they do require service but if that final drive or shaft ever fail (and they do!) the bill will floor you (at least on the BMW's.will...look it up).
 

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So, I've been thinking about buying the "new" Honda Trail 125 until I took a ride on my 08 wee, God that was fun, I did hit 100 (quickly with big cans), but only for a moment, I'm a law abiding citizen...
Regarding chains, that wax we spray on has a forever chemical that's being found in our bloodstreams and drinking water, Teflon is basically a banned substance, is a PFAS chemical, and I'm back to messy oil on my chain.
PFAS is tying up every state legislature at this time, God, why does Dow invent chemicals prior to testing on a few animals for tumors...
 

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For years I have read all this chain stuff and wonder how I got along without any of this aftermarket stuff. Back when I raced off road we used what is now called "roller chain", which is just chain without O-rings. We had to clean it after every race and oil it. Then we got a gift from heaven: O-ring chains. With these the factory "vacum packed" the lube inside the rollers and sealed it in, and kept the dirt out, with O-rings. Other than wiping off the dirt and giving a very little lube to the outside once in a while these chains lasted a long, long time.
I see people now going overboard trying to over oil and over clean these marvels of modern engineering. They do crazy stuff like spraying all sorts of solvents on the chain to clean it! These solvents can do more damage than good! If they are of the wrong chemical composition they can damage the o-rings and shorten the life of the chain. Some people use power washers on them! That is sinful! You blast wanted past the o-rings, wash out the factory lube and rust the chain from the inside. Bad!
Your car likely (like 99% now do) has sealed wheel bearings that work just like your o-ring chain. Those sealed wheel bearings will more often than not last the life of the vehicle if you don't beat them to death in pot holes. You never lube those bearings, they don't need it. I have taken them apart with well over 100,000 miles on them and the original lube is still inside. Very few wheel bearings fail due to lack of lubrication (but it can in very rare cases happen). Your chain is the same way, sealed in lube, lasts the life of the chain if all goes well and the owner doesn't wash out the lube with a power washer or harsh solvents in a vain attempt to "service" that chain.
Its all very simple: WIth a rag wipe off the outer part of the chain ever 400-500 miles or so depending on environmental conditions (a.k.a. "when it gets dirty"!). Put a very light coat of a good quality chain lube on it after riding (not before!) just to keep the outside of the chain from rusting and to give a little lube to the outside of the o-rings. Use a quality lube that is made for o-ring chains. Do NOT use WD-40 on a chain! WD-40 is not a proper lube for anything! Its mostly solvents made to clean up rust and displace water. Read up on what it was originally made for (removing rust from early Atlas missiles) .
( WD-40,WD-40 inventors | edubilla.com
The properties that make it a good solvent may also make it harmful to some 0-rings.
Do you really need a chain oiler? Some swear by them while others like me just smile. One of my old off road bikes had one built in from the factory but that was decades ago before we had o-ring chains. Of course the people who make these devices want you to lust for them and shell out your money for one. After all, its how they make money. And, they won't hurt anything. I have always thought about how chains like to sling off oil so much and wondered how it was going to be practical to just drip oil on the chain while it was spinning! I oil my chain and then don't ride it for hours or even days, giving that sticky Bel-Ray stuff (my favorite from racing days) time to set up and stick well.

Whatever you want to do to your chain is your business. I do, however, hate for people to waste time and money on things they don't need. I also hate to see people kill a good chain by over loving it and doing too much to it. Just use common sense and get the facts. Don't fall for everything you read on the internet and always question anything a company tells you while trying to sell you one of their products. If you want to swear your oiler is the greatest thing since sex then go for it! (its not, BTW). But do keep; the external part of your chain clean. Give it a light coat of oil to prevent rust. Remember all that sticky oil is actually more likely to allow dirt and sand to stick to your chain and actually can cause it to wear more!

As for shaft drive vrs. chain: I have owned both and put lots of miles on them. I have run chains off road on motocross, hare scrambles, flat-track, trials, and more. I have run both roller and o-ring chains on road and dual-sport bikes. I have owned several shaft driven bikes. (and yes, you do have to maintain shafts/final drives).. Forget that "no maintenance shaft fable!). My favorite drive system is a good o-ring chain. WIth minimal proper care they will last tens of thousands of trouble free miles. Shafts will last too but they do require service but if that final drive or shaft ever fail (and they do!) the bill will floor you (at least on the BMW's.will...look it up).
I wish this was in the chain oiling section, because I have to reply to this. I do not mean to side track the 650 vs the 1000 discussion. However since this was placed here, I have to opine.
> Hans, thank you for posting all of that. I have a few thoughts and ideas I would like you and others to consider.
A few thoughts ........
First off, WD40 does have solvents and I was told one was kerosene. I have not found a single use for wd-40. Its ok, but specialized other lubes are light years better.
I am guessing a chained wiped down with Corrosion X, would be a super good idea since C-X does not allow rust/ oxidation to form.

Hans, I do not question your experience. However, I do not understand some of your conclusions. Why? I read this >> http://www.scottoiler.com/explore-scottoiler/ Of course it was put out by a chain oiler company, so they have a vested interest. OTOH, my science based pragmatic mind, says much of that said makes sense.

I appreciate the fact that metal on metal contact ( sprocket teeth to metal chain) may need a molecule thick film keeping said metal parts from rubbing.

Ok here is the definitive conclusion.. that has to be concluded, once testing is done.
Set up two identical chain drives. Run them both with equal amount of exposure to debris. Oil one and not the other. There could be variations on this theme. It would be interesting. A test more realistic that F9. The test would have to be much more than chains rolling around on sockets. etc etc
 

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Should I sell my 2011 45000 km (mostly paved roads) DL650 and buy 2016 DL1000 with 60000 ADV kilometers?
 

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If you can a good enough price AND the bike is mostly used for touring/out of town riding. The 1000 is nice but it's a thirsty pig around town and not as nice there as the 650.
 

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So I'm new here and haven't read this entire thread, can someone summarize for me? What's the verdict?:p

I'm still tossing around the 650/1000 debate myself. I've ridden and SV650, never a 'strom of any kind. There is DL1000 for rent on Twisted Road near me, but he wants $200/day for it. I currently ride an Fz6, which couldn't be more different. Pretty much the other end of the spectrum in terms of power delivery. The FZ has big top end rush and delivers 90rwhp at 11.5K rpm but no low-end to speak of. The DL650 would suit me better most of the time, but I worry I would miss the ponies which has me leaning toward the 1000. I do like having that little something extra when you need some getaway speed.
 

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So I'm new here and haven't read this entire thread, can someone summarize for me? What's the verdict?:p

I'm still tossing around the 650/1000 debate myself. I've ridden and SV650, never a 'strom of any kind. There is DL1000 for rent on Twisted Road near me, but he wants $200/day for it. I currently ride an Fz6, which couldn't be more different. Pretty much the other end of the spectrum in terms of power delivery. The FZ has big top end rush and delivers 90rwhp at 11.5K rpm but no low-end to speak of. The DL650 would suit me better most of the time, but I worry I would miss the ponies which has me leaning toward the 1000. I do like having that little something extra when you need some getaway speed.
All boils down to the HP.....if you're fine with maybe not being able to pull off a chancey triple car overtake on a two lane road, then the 650 will be fine. I deliberately got the 650 because I know I'd not be able to stay off the horsepower if I had a 1000cc bike. It was a decision based upon survival.
 
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