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I just did my 600 mile service. As I replaced the oil, I used Amsoil 10w40 synthetic motorcycle oil. I've put 50 miles on the bike since the service.
Talking with a mechanic friend afterward, he told me that synthetic oil "freezes" the breakin of the motor and shouldn't be used until the motor is completely broken in. Our motor isn't fully broken in until about 1200 miles.
Should I drain and fill with regular oil, saving the switch to synthetic until the next oil change?
What have others done?
I'm about to leave on a 600-mile trip and want to continue the careful break-in
Thanks...
 

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I saw nothing in the manual under break in or normal operation regarding synthetic oils, just that energy conserving oils are not recommended and to stick with a good quality oil with SF or SG classification. By using a synthetic you are still following the manufacturers recommendations and this would not affect your warranty.

My personal opinion is to wait until a few thousand kms before using synthetic but this is probably based on engines that used to require significant break in periods.
 

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I just did my 600 mile service. As I replaced the oil, I used Amsoil 10w40 synthetic motorcycle oil. I've put 50 miles on the bike since the service.
Talking with a mechanic friend afterward, he told me that synthetic oil "freezes" the breakin of the motor and shouldn't be used until the motor is completely broken in. Our motor isn't fully broken in until about 1200 miles.
Should I drain and fill with regular oil, saving the switch to synthetic until the next oil change?
What have others done?
I'm about to leave on a 600-mile trip and want to continue the careful break-in
Thanks...
My advice, and what I'd do is--go on your trip and enjoy the ride! Your bike needs no further "break-in" as modern motorcycle engines are "good to go" when you buy them. Just take it easy for the first 100 miles or so, and then ride them normally. I would not use synthetic motorcycle oil in a motorcycle that uses a wet clutch, but that's just me. I've done it, and got away with it, but there's no need. I've read too many times about synthetic oil and slipping clutches. YMMV

This kind of question always makes me think of some guy in the backwoods of some third world country riding a UJM motorcycle for 15 years and 200,000 miles. What kind of motor oil does he use? :confused: Probably, any oil he can find!:jawdrop:
 

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The oil thread will introduce you to the range of "opinions" about synthetic. I am not sure about the 650 but my 1000 has a nik-a-sil cylinder coating. I ran it 1000 miles then changed to synthetic. I would go with 600 miles if you have already put synthetic in.

Synthetic is great oil but there are good dinosaur oils also. Use any oil that is rated JASO MA on the label and avoid any that are rated "energy conserving" as that is what makes the clutch slip. Many dino oils are energy conserving and all motorcycle synthetics (rated MA) are good for wet clutches

I use Mobil 1 10w-40 4t full synthetic (religously) and have since the break in period. The bike has the original clutch, burns almost no oil, and is about at 70,000 miles.
 

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I just did my 600 mile service. As I replaced the oil, I used Amsoil 10w40 synthetic motorcycle oil. I've put 50 miles on the bike since the service.
Talking with a mechanic friend afterward, he told me that synthetic oil "freezes" the breakin of the motor and shouldn't be used until the motor is completely broken in. Our motor isn't fully broken in until about 1200 miles.
Should I drain and fill with regular oil, saving the switch to synthetic until the next oil change?
What have others done?
I'm about to leave on a 600-mile trip and want to continue the careful break-in
Thanks...
You should absolutely drain the synthetic oil until the motor is completely broken in, about 3000 miles. I just retired as a service manager from a large multi brand dealership and we never, ever put in synthetic until the 3k point. The only exception is Ducati motors which come from the factory w synthetic. But those motors are broken in before they arrive. The reason is that synthetic oil is so slippery that it will not allow your rings to properly seat. Just sayin. The mechanic you spoke with was correct in my view.
 

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What I did and why...

At the first service (1000km) I changed the oil to synthetic - Motorex Power Synt 10W50.

I've done that with all my previous bikes purchased from new, and have been very happy with the result.

All the bikes have been running very well with no oil consumption between services/oil changes - several of the bikes had 70-100.000km on the clock before they were resold.

Common to all the machines was that they continued to run better until they reached 20-30.000km (acceleration, top speed, gear box and fuel consumption).

This may indicate, that changing to synthetic oil at an early stage slow down the break-in, but if that is the case, it's because it slow down wear in general, which I believe is a good thing in the long run.

The main reason that I use synthetic oil is that synthetic oil retains its lubricating ability significantly longer than equivalent mineral oil, and I often go on rides that exceeds 6000km (the indicated service interval) and don't want to change oil during my rides.
 

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For the 600 mile service I used regular oil. Besides the cost benefit of only having the new oil in for about 2400k miles before having the change it again. The motor is not fully broken in until about 3k.
Once you get to the first "full" oil change recommendation go synthetic.
 

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You should absolutely drain the synthetic oil until the motor is completely broken in, about 3000 miles. I just retired as a service manager from a large multi brand dealership and we never, ever put in synthetic until the 3k point.
...
Before this thread gets closed (this should be in the big oil thread) I just want to point out there is absolutely no reason to hold off on synthetic. It isn't any slipperier than regular oil. It doesn't slow down break in. There is no reason to not use it from day one apart from cost.. If you are going to change the oil shortly after getting it then the extra cost is a bit of a waste.

..Tom
 

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i have a couple of questions (for anyone who wants to chime in)
besides the piston ring seal, what other components in the engine need to be broken in?
how many miles does it generally take before the rings are sealed?
it would seem that unless the oil was so slippery that it would not allow sufficient temp for the rings to melt that it would'nt matter what type of oil you used (synthetic vs. dino) thoughts?:confused:
 

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The reason is that synthetic oil is so slippery
Just not the case. Also, most oil marketed as "synthetic" is actually very highly refined petroleum oil. In years past what was sold as synthetic was polyalphaolefin base or ester base, and those were somewhat different than petroleum base oil. Synthetic is a marketing term, not a chemical definition as used with oils.

What is oil that is marketed as "synthetic?" It is made from base oil of either:
--petroleum with a viscosity index greater than 120, saturates (hydrogen replacing oxygen on the oil molecule) greater than 90%, and sulfur less than .03%. (called Group III base oil)
or--PAO (poly alpha olefin) (called Group IV)
or--any other base oils (called Group V)
or--a combination of these

(Motor oil is about 75~80% base oil plus an additive package, i. e., viscosity index improvers, pour point depressants, antioxidants, antifoamants, anticorrosives, antiwear agents, friction modifiers, dye, etc.)

Break in is where the high points on a surface after machining (asperities) contact the asperities on the other part, micro-weld together, and tear off. Eventually the result is the broken-in surface. This was much worse years ago before modern machining techniques and modern lubes. It takes place on all parts, but much less than on rings and cylinder surfaces. I've seen industrial gears put under 110% of rated load in a few hours. Big diesel engines are assembled on test beds and run into a dynamometer at increasing loads up to 110% of rated horsepower within hours after initial assembly (picture the dyno able to absorb 130,000 hp!). Even in this case, the cast iron liners, cast iron rings, and cast iron piston skirt have a very detailed break in protocol that lasts 24 hours regarding the choice of fuel (sulfur content) and the choice of oil (alkalinity).
 
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