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I've read how outrageous a dealer's service can be for the first bike check-up and I'm wondering, do I really even need it?
I've just changed my own oil (after 500 miles), checked the chain's tightness (still good) and lubed it and looked at the fluid levels through all the "level windows". So if my bike seems to be running ok, do I really need to fork over a couple hundred bucks to have it looked over by a 3rd rate mechanic in the back room of a Suzuki dealer somewhere?
I'm about a "1" on a scale of 1-10 on mechanical ability, but is there anything else you guys would recommend I check on my own? I plan on heading out on a 600 mile trip this weekend. Thanks
 

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Check the bolts on the bike to make sure everything is tight, other than that, you should be good to go. When you get there, the one service interval you must do is the valve check; it's at 14 or 15k miles.

Also, I wish you wouldn't paint all dealer service techs with such a broad brush. There are some great mechanics out there. I've got one if I need him, but I mostly do my own wrenching.
 

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I've read how outrageous a dealer's service can be for the first bike check-up and I'm wondering, do I really even need it?
I've just changed my own oil (after 500 miles), checked the chain's tightness (still good) and lubed it and looked at the fluid levels through all the "level windows". So if my bike seems to be running ok, do I really need to fork over a couple hundred bucks to have it looked over by a 3rd rate mechanic in the back room of a Suzuki dealer somewhere?
I'm about a "1" on a scale of 1-10 on mechanical ability, but is there anything else you guys would recommend I check on my own? I plan on heading out on a 600 mile trip this weekend. Thanks
Usually not much happens in 600ml but if anything was missed during dealer prep for sale, it might be found now, if you can find a competent mech. Big if. It may be beneficial to have a benchmark for your valves. (you get them to write down the clearances so you know how much change has occurred when you check them in the future)
 

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I would invest in a service manual. It will give you a periodic maintenance schedule & what points are checked at each interval. Then you can look up the procedures & determine if it is within your mechanical abilities. The 600 mile service is pretty basic & according to my manual you've pretty much covere it. The only other points listed in the manual that you haven't covered is tightening exhaust bolts, checking cable play, & brake inspection. When I bought a brand new SV650 back in 2005 I asked the dealer if it would void the warranty if I performed the maintenace myself & they said as long as I didn't do any major engine, frame, suspension mods it would not. Fortunately I didn't have to test them on this. Hope this info helps & enjoy your ride. :thumbup:
 

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first service is very important, some people are competent to do it themself, others are not

the importance of first service is that it's a comprehensive inspection,

everyone hypes on oil & filter changes and check fasteners

600 miles is enuf miles to get initial stretch & loostening, hit a few potholes etc.

, check clutch adjustment, throttle cable, play in steering bearing ? shift linkage, rear brakelight switch adjustment ,abnormal wear on tires brake pads, all kinds of "little" tasks, look for manufatcuring defects that may have reared their ugly face, frame cracks, etc.

knowing how to turn a wrench is only part of the job

if your not cabable of recognizing abnormal wear or defects, you should have someone else look at it.



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So if my bike seems to be running ok, do I really need to fork over a couple hundred bucks to have it looked over by a 3rd rate mechanic in the back room of a Suzuki dealer somewhere?
I'm about a "1" on a scale of 1-10 on mechanical ability
Being a self-admitted "1" in mechanical abilities puts you in the perfect position to rate a trained professional's competence, how?
 

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Try to find some local riding buddies with at least a "7" or better rating to check over your bike and begin educating you on overall bike maintenance. It's not rocket science but it sounds as if you have a lot to learn and you should seek out more experienced advice to avoid potential problems.
 

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Only comprehensive if you do it yourself, or go to Randyo's dealer.:yesnod: I for one think it is pretty much a waste of time, I have yet to have any bike that needed anything adjusted or tightened at 600 miles...........these aint Harley's!!! Change the oil/filter if ya like, check bolts if ya like............whatever makes you feel safer and better.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Being a self-admitted "1" in mechanical abilities puts you in the perfect position to rate a trained professional's competence, how?
Wow, touchy touchy people. I wasn't being derogatory and didn't mean to piss anyone off. I admire all of you with mechanical skills. I was simply stating what many others have inferred when getting their 600 mile service. Do you think a dealer is going to put their top mechanic on a routine schedule check for a new bike? No, they're likely going to put their "3rd or 4th tier" mechanic or rookie to simply tighten bolts. Hence the "3rd rate mechanic" reference. But yes, I'll admit, a "3rd rate mechanic" will still have leaps and bounds of ability over mine. So that's why I posed the question on this forum on whether I should take my bike in or not. That's all. I'm not dissing anyone.
 

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I can't speak for your bikes or dealers but after my 600 mile service here in Britain, there was a noticable difference. A smoothing of the power from standing start for one. Seemed like someone had let loose a few more horses in the engine. Before the service the bike felt new and tight. After, it felt free and smooth. Hard to explain. I don't know whether the British bikes are somehow 'de-tuned' for the 'running-in' period but there was definite improvement. I didn't get the chance to ask what the mechanics had done because I didn't realise until halfway home (and didn't have a reason to return!). My advice would be to bite the bullet, pay the money and get it done right. It's not like your bike will be a regular at the workshop so you'll save money in the long run anyway. As has already been said, the first service is more than a quick filter and oil change. Hope this helps.
 

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Question:
I'm on 600 miles.
Called the dealer and wanted to do service, he said come back at 1000 miles.
I appreciate his honesty, since why would he tell me to come later..? doesn't make sense from a business perspective.
Does it matter?
I plan to have a 400 miles this weekend, so when I come back it is straight to the dealer.
Just asking to double check.
 

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First accessory I bought was a service manual. My intent was to do all work on the bike myself. However, after reading through the service manual, *mysterious engine ailments* may end up at the shop. The place I bought it has, my impression, a very good mechanic. Still I will do everything I can myself, and I am confident about doing the 600mi service.

The 600 mi service on these bikes amounts to

oil and filter change
check brake fluid and coolant levels
check hoses
check clutch and throttle cable free play
check steering bearing
check *many* bolts for correct torque value
check throttle body sync


I found the lower triple tree bolts to be loose, not drastically but definitely below torque listed in the book. I also found the clutch needing some adjustment. lifting the front wheel off the ground to check the steering bearing was a bit of a task.

There were some bolts I could not get too easily so I left them alone: bolts holding the exhaust to the rear cylinder, and lower rear shock mount bolts.

It is not listed as a 600mi item, but I did clean the air filter.

I did not touch the throttle bodies. It is running fine, or at least good enough for me.
 

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Mine is coming up due very rapidly, I work as a mechanic every day. I am taking my bike in to have the initial service done at a dealer so it is documented . Could I do it myself, of course. Will they check things as a motorcycle mechanic that I may miss as a equipment mechanic, very likely. Other than the valve check if it is required at 15,000 all the future services will be done by me.
 

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Only comprehensive if you do it yourself, or go to Randyo's dealer.:yesnod: I for one think it is pretty much a waste of time, I have yet to have any bike that needed anything adjusted or tightened at 600 miles...........these aint Harley's!!! Change the oil/filter if ya like, check bolts if ya like............whatever makes you feel safer and better.
Mine needed some adjustments at 600 feet. As delivered, the handlebars were way off center, the clutch wasn't adjusted, the chain was loose and the tires were low. I think it was assembled by a 3rd or 4th rate mechanic! Either that or someone had a very bad day. I took care of those things on my own and got to know my bike quicker than I normally would have so maybe they did it as a favor :) Other service at the dealer since then has been excellent and fairly priced.
 

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Wow, touchy touchy people. I wasn't being derogatory and didn't mean to piss anyone off.
My apologies for such a terse response and to a new member from the Great North State no less. I'm not pissed off, I just saw irony in your post which I felt needed pointing out.

Do you think a dealer is going to put their top mechanic on a routine schedule check for a new bike?
Yes. A least I'm lucky enough to have a smallish shop which did for me. One of the reasons they do this is check the work of the guy who assmebled the bike out of the crate after it's been run 600 miles. The assembly guy may not even be a mechanic.

I admire all of you with mechanical skills.
Not much to admire here. My skills are moderate and employed somewhat begrudgingly, therefore I ride a V-Strom.

I was simply stating what many others have inferred when getting their 600 mile service.
I wouldn't listen to others, that's how group-think gets started.

So that's why I posed the question on this forum on whether I should take my bike in or not. That's all. I'm not dissing anyone.
This thread prompted me to dig up my 600-mile service receipt. It was done at 849 miles and cost $100. I did my own oil change at around 200 miles to remove any crap ASAP. I should have negotiated the 600-mile service into the purchase price. They changed the oil and oil filter, topped off the coolant, checked the tire pressure, idle speed, brake fluid and throttle and clutch cables freeplay. They also lubed the chain and adjusted it and checked the lights.

Given that this was my first new motorcycle, I think it was worth it for me. When he was done, the mechanic went over the servicing schedule and showed me where the oil drain plug was and was happy to answer what now seems like a bunch of inane questions.

But like Randyo, I'm lucky to have a shop I trust and has not given me reason not to. I've heard the horror stories and I feel that it's worth letting them do things like valve checks and throttle synchs. I'd hate to hear they closed, so they get my business. I've done my own oil changes and spark plugs, but I've had them replace plugs when it coincided with a valve check.
They do my chain and sprockets and somtimes tires.

Again, I apologize for sounding like the ass that I can sometimes be. I was kinda grumpy earlier, I had to cancel out on a ride to Roan Mountain today with some Florida Troopers because the 12 year old dog pictured for my avatar was gravely ill and had to go to the vet. He's okay now, he's just getting old an cranky like me.
 

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warranty

If you skip the first dealer service and have warranty issues later on it might be a bit more tricky getting it fixed. Legally they can't refuse service, but that won't keep them from dragging their feet.

Having a good relationship with the dealer is a good thing. This doesn't mean that they have to do all the service but if you're a 1 on a scale of 1-10 perhaps they should. Make a mistake on car service means you might be stranded on the side of the road, do the same on a bike and you might end up in far worse shape, mechanics on a bike are not forgiving, in the least.

Bill H.
 

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I did mine myself, but its far from my first. If they will do it for $100, just bring it to them. If they want much more than that, I'm sure you have a more experienced buddy you can bribe to help you.
 

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My apologies for such a terse response and to a new member from the Great Again, I apologize for sounding like the ass that I can sometimes be. I was kinda grumpy earlier, I had to cancel out on a ride to Roan Mountain today with some Florida Troopers because the 12 year old dog pictured for my avatar was gravely ill and had to go to the vet. He's okay now, he's just getting old an cranky like me.
Sad to hear about your dog!!
Glad to hear he's OK !!!
 

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just a note... my 2011 owners manual states that the valve interval is 24000 miles.
 

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just a note... my 2011 owners manual states that the valve interval is 24000 miles.
Did Suzuki up it from 14,500? My manual says 24,000 km/14,500 mi. Just wondering if something is different on the k11 motor or if they just changed the interval in the service manual because they realize most bikes don't require any adjustment that soon.
 
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