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I have researched highway pegs for crash bars for the GS and apart from Wunderlich have not come up with anything. Which model are those? Are they just regular foot pegs?

NC

Might want to rethink the Boxer highway peg thing. I can stretch my legs clear out by laying my heel on these! Won't leave home without them! Fold up tight when not in use. Many boxer owners run a similar setup.
 

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Mine are from a kit where a bracket mounts to the valve cover on an Oilhead I had. The footpegs are rear passenger pegs from an Oilhead RT, and the swivel bracket was part of the kit. I simply drilled a hole in the engine bars on the Wethead RT and mounted them. You can get bolt on stuff from Illium Works, but take out a second mortgage before you look at their stuff. There are lots of universal pegs and mounts out there, but the quality of them is what you have to be wary of.
 

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... I use it all of the time. Stops me from speeding on the highway on my commute to work. It's also awesome on the interstate for high mileage days. I really miss it when I'm on the Strom. ...
I have always had a throttle lock on all of my street bikes. Even pre Alta Vista when we just had a bit of cord that wedged between the switch block and the rubber grip. I had a full fledged cruise control on my BMW. I was very impressed at how well it worked. I used it at about the same frequency that I use my throttle stops. I do use both systems when I'm approaching a town where TomTom tells me it is a "high enforcement area" and when I cross the border from California to Oregon. (which is always high enforcement going in)

After that I don't care much about a electronic cruise control. When I need to shift position or zip something up, etc _ I'm fine with either. Besides, on my long haul riding I always feel the need to avoid daydreaming.
 

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Hello all! (Formerly MAZ4ME). I had a long discussion with the Suzuki District Manager about the 2020 Vstrom1050. He said the new model has larger throttle bodies, ride-by-wire throttle actuation, different pistons and camshafts, Euro-5 emissions tuning, a bit more HP and torque. The exhaust valve in the mid-pipe has been eliminated, the muffler is different. I noticed that the instrument cluster is different and smaller, and has a USB port behind a rubber cover at the lower left area of the gauges. Very nice! Cruise control is available on the top 2 trim levels, so you cant get cruise on the base model with the cast rims, which I prefer. The cruise is a "smart" system, which will slow you down if you get to close to the vehicle in front of you. Again, very nice, just like the system in my car. Things that didnt excite me: The seat has sharp edges on the side, unlike the previous rounded seats. he 1050 seat does have a 20mmheight adjustment range, so there is that. I cant speak for comfort of the 1050 not having ridden one yet, but the seat on my '14 DL1K is very comfortable for me long distance. Also, the windscreen is smaller, and cannot be adjustable for angle on the fly, like my Vstrom. There is a lever you lower at the base of the headlamp in front, and you can raise the screen through what looked like a 2" range. Some of the fittings and body work looked, well...cheap to me compared to the previous model. The instrument cluster in particular looks even less integrated than before.
What I find curious is that the 1050 is a 1037cc, same as the previous model. Bore and stroke are the same. So I asked the rep if the 1050 moniker is really a marketing ploy of a correction to what the '14+ Vstrom1000 should have been called. He grinned and said.."Yes".
I'd have liked to have had cruise control on my Vstrom1000, but Ive done fine without it. I bought mine for sport-touring, commuting, and multistate travel. Not for off-roading. For that it's been a superb dance partner, coudnt be happier with it. I prefer cast as opposed to the spoke rims, so at present if buying a new bike not having cruise on this bike would send me shopping elswhere.
The 1050 is a swing and a miss for me, but I'm sure many others will have the exact opposite view. Some like chocolate, some like vanilla.
 

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Does anyone have an idea of where the 30 pound weight gain has come from? I know the bike has a new catalytic converter but since it had one to begin with I cannot see this resulting in more than a few pounds. The last bike was borderline for me on weight but cruise control on the new model is a real selling point for me. I don't like the 30 pound weight gain but don't know if you can do much about it.
Hello all! (Formerly MAZ4ME). I had a long discussion with the Suzuki District Manager about the 2020 Vstrom1050. He said the new model has larger throttle bodies, ride-by-wire throttle actuation, different pistons and camshafts, Euro-5 emissions tuning, a bit more HP and torque. The exhaust valve in the mid-pipe has been eliminated, the muffler is different. I noticed that the instrument cluster is different and smaller, and has a USB port behind a rubber cover at the lower left area of the gauges. Very nice! Cruise control is available on the top 2 trim levels, so you cant get cruise on the base model with the cast rims, which I prefer. The cruise is a "smart" system, which will slow you down if you get to close to the vehicle in front of you. Again, very nice, just like the system in my car. Things that didnt excite me: The seat has sharp edges on the side, unlike the previous rounded seats. he 1050 seat does have a 20mmheight adjustment range, so there is that. I cant speak for comfort of the 1050 not having ridden one yet, but the seat on my '14 DL1K is very comfortable for me long distance. Also, the windscreen is smaller, and cannot be adjustable for angle on the fly, like my Vstrom. There is a lever you lower at the base of the headlamp in front, and you can raise the screen through what looked like a 2" range. Some of the fittings and body work looked, well...cheap to me compared to the previous model. The instrument cluster in particular looks even less integrated than before.
What I find curious is that the 1050 is a 1037cc, same as the previous model. Bore and stroke are the same. So I asked the rep if the 1050 moniker is really a marketing ploy of a correction to what the '14+ Vstrom1000 should have been called. He grinned and said.."Yes".
I'd have liked to have had cruise control on my Vstrom1000, but Ive done fine without it. I bought mine for sport-touring, commuting, and multistate travel. Not for off-roading. For that it's been a superb dance partner, coudnt be happier with it. I prefer cast as opposed to the spoke rims, so at present if buying a new bike not having cruise on this bike would send me shopping elswhere.
The 1050 is a swing and a miss for me, but I'm sure many others will have the exact opposite view. Some like chocolate, some like vanilla.
So Numbercruncher asked about the weight gain from the V2 to the 1050 several posts back and never got any serious replies. It’s actually nearly 40 lbs!!! If you compare Cycle World’s spec.s curb weight to curb weight (507lbs. vs. 545lbs.). Doesn’t that amount of unexplained weight gain bother anyone else? The V2 used to be considered a lightweight in the big ADV category but that certainly is not the case with the 1050. I’ve dropped my 2014 a couple of times fully loaded and it might still be laying there if I’d had to hoist another 40lbs. If the engine and chassis are basically unchanged where’s all that extra pork coming from? Any ideas?
 

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Hello all! (Formerly MAZ4ME). I had a long discussion with the Suzuki District Manager about the 2020 Vstrom1050. He said the new model has larger throttle bodies, ride-by-wire throttle actuation, different pistons and camshafts, Euro-5 emissions tuning, a bit more HP and torque. The exhaust valve in the mid-pipe has been eliminated, the muffler is different. I noticed that the instrument cluster is different and smaller, and has a USB port behind a rubber cover at the lower left area of the gauges. Very nice! Cruise control is available on the top 2 trim levels, so you cant get cruise on the base model with the cast rims, which I prefer. The cruise is a "smart" system, which will slow you down if you get to close to the vehicle in front of you. Again, very nice, just like the system in my car. Things that didnt excite me: The seat has sharp edges on the side, unlike the previous rounded seats. he 1050 seat does have a 20mmheight adjustment range, so there is that. I cant speak for comfort of the 1050 not having ridden one yet, but the seat on my '14 DL1K is very comfortable for me long distance. Also, the windscreen is smaller, and cannot be adjustable for angle on the fly, like my Vstrom. There is a lever you lower at the base of the headlamp in front, and you can raise the screen through what looked like a 2" range. Some of the fittings and body work looked, well...cheap to me compared to the previous model. The instrument cluster in particular looks even less integrated than before.
What I find curious is that the 1050 is a 1037cc, same as the previous model. Bore and stroke are the same. So I asked the rep if the 1050 moniker is really a marketing ploy of a correction to what the '14+ Vstrom1000 should have been called. He grinned and said.."Yes".
I'd have liked to have had cruise control on my Vstrom1000, but Ive done fine without it. I bought mine for sport-touring, commuting, and multistate travel. Not for off-roading. For that it's been a superb dance partner, coudnt be happier with it. I prefer cast as opposed to the spoke rims, so at present if buying a new bike not having cruise on this bike would send me shopping elswhere.
The 1050 is a swing and a miss for me, but I'm sure many others will have the exact opposite view. Some like chocolate, some like vanilla.
I purchased a 2014 Vstrom 1000 the day they went on sale at the dealer. IMHO after 45,000 miles, I still think the bike is awesome. I agree with your opinions above, and utilize my bike for the same type of riding. I am not in love with spoked wheels, although that is not a deal breaker. I also have lived without C.C. for the past 5 years, and don't HAVE to have it. While each of us may have certain likes and dislike concerning the 2020 Vstrom 1050, if it is as good or better than the previous models, it is still a GREAT bike. Maybe not great enough for me to purchase one a.s.a.p., but I still love Japanese bikes for their reliability, and any year Vstrom still checks off many of my desires for my type of riding - I do not ride much offroad, only hard packed dirt. My goal for this year, is to ride as much as I can. Yes the bike is a little quirky, but that just adds to its' character. I will be happy no matter which Vstrom I ride.
 

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Maybe not great enough for me to purchase one a.s.a.p.
I think that's the way a lot/most of us feel. They are so close, and if it wasn't for the price increase to the XT model a lot of us may have taken the leap. I suspect that a lot of us will have a 2020 1050 next year when we can buy the left over model years at a deeply discounted rate :) Also gives time for the aftermarket to catch up on farkles and find out if our accessories can be transferred over.

At MSRP I would not buy the new 1050, I'd look to other bikes. Even just for the sake of trying something new. KTM, Honda Africa Twin, Tiger 900, Versys 1000, etc. Once the price comes down though on the V-Strom that will likely lead to V-Strom #5 for me haha.
 

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What I find very interesting is the difference in price between countries. The XA in Canada (XT everywhere else) has a MSRP of $16099 CDN. The same bike in the US has a MSRP of $14799 USD, which equates to over $19600 CDN. The MSRP in the UK is $11299 GBP, or around $19400 CDN. Going the other way, our $16099 CDN price is only $12,150 USD, substantially lower than the US MSRP.

I find it odd that the Canadian and US markets could differ that much to justify such a large price discrepancy.
 

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So Numbercruncher asked about the weight gain from the V2 to the 1050 several posts back and never got any serious replies. It’s actually nearly 40 lbs!!! If you compare Cycle World’s spec.s curb weight to curb weight (507lbs. vs. 545lbs.). Doesn’t that amount of unexplained weight gain bother anyone else? The V2 used to be considered a lightweight in the big ADV category but that certainly is not the case with the 1050. I’ve dropped my 2014 a couple of times fully loaded and it might still be laying there if I’d had to hoist another 40lbs. If the engine and chassis are basically unchanged where’s all that extra pork coming from? Any ideas?
Is that comparing to a DL1000 model with spoked wheels? This weight is for the XT version which includes the centerstand and crash bars. Were those standard on the previous model being compared to here? All of those things add weight.
 

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What I find very interesting is the difference in price between countries. The XA in Canada (XT everywhere else) has a MSRP of $16099 CDN. The same bike in the US has a MSRP of $14799 USD, which equates to over $19600 CDN. The MSRP in the UK is $11299 GBP, or around $19400 CDN. Going the other way, our $16099 CDN price is only $12,150 USD, substantially lower than the US MSRP.

I find it odd that the Canadian and US markets could differ that much to justify such a large price discrepancy.
Here is a overview of the spread between currency "buy" and currency "sell" prices. It will answer your question.
 

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What I find very interesting is the difference in price between countries. The XA in Canada (XT everywhere else) has a MSRP of $16099 CDN.
...
To me is seems like one hell of a deal! IIRC my 2015 DL1000 was $14,000 Can$ before taxes. 5 years later, Cruise control, electronics. etc for about a $2,000 increase over 5 years seems like a great deal!

I would be surprised if it isn't my next bike. (With only about 212,500 km on my DL1000 it might be awhile.)

..Tom
 

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To me is seems like one hell of a deal! IIRC my 2015 DL1000 was $14,000 Can$ before taxes. 5 years later, Cruise control, electronics. etc for about a $2,000 increase over 5 years seems like a great deal!

I would be surprised if it isn't my next bike, although I really wish it had alloy wheels. (With only about 212,500 km on my DL1000 it might be awhile.)

..Tom
 

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Here is a overview of the spread between currency "buy" and currency "sell" prices. It will answer your question.
I understand exchange rates and the buy/sell prices. Regardless, if you were to go to the Bank of America today and purchase $16099CDN it would cost you $12755US including bank fees of approximately $607US. That's still more than $2000US less than the MSRP in the US. I realize that purchasing a vehicle in another country is often impractical, and there are barriers in place (import fees, registration, warranty, taxes, etc.) that aim to prevent this from happening. This may make purchasing a bike in Canada difficult for an American. But would it be $2000 worth of difficulty, especially if you live very close to the Canada/US border? I'm not sure, but like I said, I find it interesting.
 

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What I find very interesting is the difference in price between countries. The XA in Canada (XT everywhere else) has a MSRP of $16099 CDN. The same bike in the US has a MSRP of $14799 USD, which equates to over $19600 CDN. The MSRP in the UK is $11299 GBP, or around $19400 CDN. Going the other way, our $16099 CDN price is only $12,150 USD, substantially lower than the US MSRP.

I find it odd that the Canadian and US markets could differ that much to justify such a large price discrepancy.
The price in converted dollars isn't directly related to the currency exchanges. Rather, understand that Suzuki Motor of America and Suzuki Canada are two separate companies which buy their motorcycles from Suzuki of Japan. These two separate companies have different marketing and price their products with different MSRPs, rebates, accessory packages etc.

Years ago, back in the early 2000 era, I bought a new 02 RM250 for ~$4350 in Canada while the going price in Minnesota was over $1000 higher. The Canadian RM250s came with better tires plus a spare top end kit too. Interestingly, the RM125 was priced about the same converted dollars in Canada as the US. The Canadian RMs did not qualify for the US off-road race contingency programs. Same for Yam and Honda. Hard to win on a Kaw back then, so not a factor for racing with a green bike, LOL.
 

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Is that comparing to a DL1000 model with spoked wheels? This weight is for the XT version which includes the centerstand and crash bars. Were those standard on the previous model being compared to here? All of those things add weight.
Ahhh... I think you’re absolutely right. Almost all the articles I used for comparison were for the base model 2014 since there wasn’t an XT version back then. I agree; with spoked wheels, skid plate, crash bars, center stand, etc. that could easily account for the extra 38 lbs. That’s what reading spec.s at 2am will do for you! I’m feeling a bit better about that 545lbs. curb weight now. Since my bike is the 2014 Adventure model with all the farkles the previous owner and I added I’m pretty I’ve picked up substantially more than that, especially fully loaded. Thanks for the ‘wake-up’.
 

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To me is seems like one hell of a deal! IIRC my 2015 DL1000 was $14,000 Can$ before taxes. 5 years later, Cruise control, electronics. etc for about a $2,000 increase over 5 years seems like a great deal!

I would be surprised if it isn't my next bike. (With only about 212,500 km on my DL1000 it might be awhile.)

..Tom
Why the heck did you pay so much? are you sure that's what you paid? I paid $10,500 for my 2014. MSRP was 11,999 but I bought it in 2015 as a left over model. My 2018 was 12,999. MSRP on the 2018 is $13,499. I saw a couple dealers advertising them for $11,999 right now.
 

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I bought my '14 DL1K for $6799US Jan '17 with 20 miles on it from our area mega-dealer as a new/leftover. And that included the Suzuki side cases and mounting hardware(They are perfect for me-- along with the Desert Khaki color-- but I may be a cult of one here) they left on by mistake! The new Kawasaki Versys1000LT would be next alternative if I were buying today. Starting price retail is $17999, OUCH!!
But after years of inline Fours, the allure of a big V-Twin has me hooked.
 

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I'm a big fan of that khaki color scheme. It would be awesome in a matte finish.

I'm going to take my Vee on (well-maintained, let's be honest!) dirt roads now and then, so it's going to get dusty. Seems silly to have fancy, shiny, car-like paint anywhere on it.
 

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Supposedly part of the weight comes from the standard center stand and crash bars. That, in all fairness, will add twenty pounds, low on the bike, that I would add anyway.

NC


So Numbercruncher asked about the weight gain from the V2 to the 1050 several posts back and never got any serious replies. It’s actually nearly 40 lbs!!! If you compare Cycle World’s spec.s curb weight to curb weight (507lbs. vs. 545lbs.). Doesn’t that amount of unexplained weight gain bother anyone else? The V2 used to be considered a lightweight in the big ADV category but that certainly is not the case with the 1050. I’ve dropped my 2014 a couple of times fully loaded and it might still be laying there if I’d had to hoist another 40lbs. If the engine and chassis are basically unchanged where’s all that extra pork coming from? Any ideas?
 

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So Numbercruncher asked about the weight gain from the V2 to the 1050 several posts back and never got any serious replies. It’s actually nearly 40 lbs!!! If you compare Cycle World’s spec.s curb weight to curb weight (507lbs. vs. 545lbs.). Doesn’t that amount of unexplained weight gain bother anyone else? The V2 used to be considered a lightweight in the big ADV category but that certainly is not the case with the 1050. I’ve dropped my 2014 a couple of times fully loaded and it might still be laying there if I’d had to hoist another 40lbs.
This is one of the reasons why I bought mine ('14 DL1000A). It weighs, wet less than my old Blackbird did dry (about 220kg v 227kg, or about 2 million pounds in the old language). This new model is right up there with the heft of the GSes and Teneres.

Given that you'd be expected to ride it off-road and that usually means a greater risk of dropping it, making it harder to pick up ain't exactly a selling point, is it?
 
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