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2020-2022 1050 Questions

4974 Views 16 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  kaandemir_
I've been shopping for a 1050 V-strom, and looking mainly at 2020-2022 models (all 4 of them that are for sale in a 300mile radius of me currently...)

Are there any notable differences in these 3 model years?



Is there a reason to avoid added costs of "adventure" trim models? i.e., is aftermarket luggage better? (I've read stock suzuki pannier mounts encroach on passenger space?)


My usage would be 45min commutes to work (no freeways)- and 2up touring with camping gear.


Thanks for any thoughts!
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The only difference between the years is color options, otherwise no changes.
I can't speak for the Adventure trim, but in my opinion a wider selection of aftermarket options can be had for less money than the OEM upgrade (but you have to check and compare for yourself, depending on luggage options in your area, time on your hands, level of expertise, etc)

Unless you're truly set on the 1050, I suggest considering the 650 as well. It's cheaper, and consumes considerably less fuel.
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Unless you're truly set on the 1050, I suggest considering the 650 as well. It's cheaper, and consumes considerably less fuel.
Are you sure about that?

My 2020 DL1050 has averaged 47mpg US over 83,154 miles.
My 2012 DL650 averaged 49.4 mpg US over 86,705 miles.

Perhaps the latest gen DL650 is much better than my 2012 was but this doesn't seem like a considerably less fuel consumption on the DL650. (Yes premium recommended on the big engine vs regular gas.)

..Tom
On the question of mpg on the 650 i found the gen 2 was better that my gen 3 probably due to having to pass emissions .
I recently bought a new 2020 1050XT. I researched to confirm there were no meaningful differences. There weren't any that I could ever find. I wanted the heated grips the Adventure had, so I had OEM heated grips installed. I went with Givi bags and mounts b/c I like their looks and their performance was reputed to be very good. The color I wanted was the orange/white so 2020 was what I got.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzuki_V-Strom_1050 lists the differences between the M0 1050 models (base / xt / adv), but sadly does not list any model upgrade / new differences over the 3 years.
Perhaps Suzuki marketing may disclose how they created the necessary hype to attract the sales for riders to purchase the newer models?
The years don't make a difference but the the XT and Adv models have a lot more electronics than the base model. You get cruise and a really great IMU based traction control. I was not looking for the TC or ABS, but I've found the TC to be amazingly good if you push it on gravel. My braking skills have not yet atrophied away yet, so my braking generally doesn't utilize the ABS. But having a backup for my lack of skill certainly doesn't appear to be horrible.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzuki_V-Strom_1050 lists the differences between the M0 1050 models (base / xt / adv), but sadly does not list any model upgrade / new differences over the 3 years.
Perhaps Suzuki marketing may disclose how they created the necessary hype to attract the sales for riders to purchase the newer models?
Transmission ratios, teevee dashboard & durable exhaust valves for the m.y. '23. The Transmission ratios will please some but not others.
For those that demand a 21" hoop,, that is a option.
It makes me wonder which ratios the '20 offered. My gen1 is a blunder of gaps and crunches.
Yep, threads like 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE and Northwest has good info on the M3 1050.
However the original question in #1 above was a query wrt the differences of the M0 - M2 models and did not include the M3 model. But thanx anyway for pointing out some of the M3 upgrades.
I read of a few of these interesting upgrades but on the M3 DE model (replaces the XT), for example the quick shifter, TFT, 21” front wheel, greater ground clearance, disable ABS facility on the rear wheel, longer travel suspension, frame mods, with some minor internal engine mods (valves), taller 1st and Sixth gears…. (New adventures at Suzuki: Firm ditch 1050 XT for off-road focused 1050 DE in updated 2023 V-Strom range)
Yep, threads like 2023 Suzuki V-Strom 1050 and V-Strom 1050DE and Northwest has good info on the M3 1050.
However the original question in #1 above was a query wrt the differences of the M0 - M2 models and did not include the M3 model. But thanx anyway for pointing out some of the M3 upgrades.
I read of a few of these interesting upgrades but on the M3 DE model (replaces the XT), for example the quick shifter, TFT, 21” front wheel, greater ground clearance, disable ABS facility on the rear wheel, longer travel suspension, frame mods, with some minor internal engine mods (valves), taller 1st and Sixth gears…. (New adventures at Suzuki: Firm ditch 1050 XT for off-road focused 1050 DE in updated 2023 V-Strom range)
Gert, you are correct in pointing out the OP asked about '20-22 and I jumped ahead to '23. There was so little changed that I overlooked the question. So , okay, MY'22. Cast wheel delete, Econ offering delete, BNG. (bold new graphics)
The dealers that are holding these are going to have to compete with the feature laden (/sarc) '23, and that will hurt. For the OP, here is the link to model year '22.



So I skimmed the list of hard parts on the DE but I missed one. The frame geometry for offroad worth. Yes I think they are on to something positive with that . I follow that with "taller first gear". Theres a ying-yang! OH, The smell of burnt clutch plates in the morning. Now, as a street bike, I welcome that because the 1-2- split never worked rolling corners. 1st was a granny gear so clunk lurch wobble around the corner and rev clunk 2nd on exit. Taller sixth??? Another GAP from fifth. Here;s the rub on that ... ABS nannies won't allow user sprocket variations from factory set final drive ratios. Trapped! Moving on... A twink shifter on a 550 pound dirt bike! (chortle) A clear, readable dashboard. Thats progress! Return of cast wheels. Thats good for me as I can't imagine a 555# bike in the dirt.
My quips aside, I feel that Suzuki made a solid effort to improve an existing model within the constraints of market and manufacturing difficulties. We should be hearing soon how these changes apply to the riding experience. TM

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... I follow that with "taller first gear". Theres a ying-yang! OH, The smell of burnt clutch plates in the morning. Now, as a street bike, I welcome that because the 1-2- split never worked rolling corners. 1st was a granny gear so clunk lurch wobble around the corner and rev clunk 2nd on exit. Taller sixth??? Another GAP from fifth. Here;s the rub on that ... ABS nannies won't allow user sprocket variations from factory set final drive ratios. Trapped! Moving on... A twink shifter on a 550 pound dirt bike! (chortle) A clear, readable dashboard. Thats progress! Return of cast wheels. Thats good for me as I can't imagine a 555# bike in the dirt.
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Do we know if final drive change from previous versions of DL1050? With taller 6th and 1st and 2nd gear closer together shorter final drive ratio would work well.

..Tom
Do we know if final drive change from previous versions of DL1050? With taller 6th and 1st and 2nd gear closer together shorter final drive ratio would work well.

..Tom
Interesting you mention that VTom and I don't have an answer for that. Suzuki saying that they incorporated a taller 6th leads me to think that your bike had a shorter 6th than my gen1. A blessing, I'd say. I did ask you this very question when you first bought your Marlboro. And here is the rub. I do a real 80-85 mph at 5000. What do I do with the 4000 more available about that point? Ride in 5th is the answer I guess as the power curve is 5k upward. Overly tall gearing is like dragging a parachute, and the 5th-6th gap exacerbates this. Suzuki did so well with the seamless ratios of the 650. I wonder what drives their thinking with the DL.
My understanding is that the original V-Strom DL1000 was designed by Suzuki Germany. As a result it had very tall gearing that was suited for higher speed riding on the autobahn but on the tall side here. Shortening the final drive gearing (by changing front or rear sprocket) on the first gen DL1000 paid great dividends in useable performance in North America.

I believe my 2015 DL1000 had shorter gearing than the first gen DL1000 and my DL1050 seems to continue that. It passes well at highway speeds in 6th and is fun to downshift and rev it out when you want to pass real fast.

If they shortened the final drive on the 1050de with taller first and 6th it seems to me it would still have the lower first gear without crunching into 2nd and still have a useable top gear relaxed on highway and still very useable. Maybe it would be as nice a tranny as the sweet tranny in the DL650...

..Tom
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My understanding is that the original V-Strom DL1000 was designed by Suzuki Germany. As a result it had very tall gearing that was suited for higher speed riding on the autobahn but on the tall side here. Shortening the final drive gearing (by changing front or rear sprocket) on the first gen DL1000 paid great dividends in useable performance in North America.

I believe my 2015 DL1000 had shorter gearing than the first gen DL1000 and my DL1050 seems to continue that. It passes well at highway speeds in 6th and is fun to downshift and rev it out when you want to pass real fast.

If they shortened the final drive on the 1050de with taller first and 6th it seems to me it would still have the lower first gear without crunching into 2nd and still have a useable top gear relaxed on highway and still very useable. Maybe it would be as nice a tranny as the sweet tranny in the DL650...

..Tom
I am at 17 x 43 and could go lower to better match hp curve with wind resistance except I would still have a 5 spd as 1st would be re -dick- useless. I did beg a ride on a 2020 1050xt and it was my impression that the ratios were less intrusive so only checking part numbers or speaking to a tech at Suzuki would finalize that as fact. Which still leaves unanswered whats coming with the changes in the '23.
I can't speak for the Adventure trim, but in my opinion a wider selection of aftermarket options can be had for less money than the OEM upgrade (but you have to check and compare for yourself, depending on luggage options in your area, time on your hands, level of expertise, etc)



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