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New bike break in. Followed manual up to 7000 rpms to 1000 miles. After 1000 miles (after reading resources to hit red line for break in), I stayed in 3rd to get to 8500 rps for about a 45 second length of time a couple times. Seems like a struggle on the engine. My question is...is it ok to crank up the rpms in lower gears to finish the break in? Did I do damage? No way I can hit even 7000 RPMs in 6th gear. Too fast. Thanks!
 

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Just keep varying the engine speed and avoid lugging it ie overloading it at low engine revs.
Modern engines are mostly broken in at the factory, you're just finishing the process, and modern engines don't need remotely like the care during break-in that 80's motors did ( <cough cough> KLR650 <cough> )
 

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This get brought up a lot. The answers is just ride it how you going to ride it. 90% of the break-in was done when the motor was bench tested at the factory. Most to the remaining 10% was done within the 1st few miles of it being ridden.

Watch the road not the tach!
 

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Most of the new engine break in is in the transmission gears. You will notice as the engine
gets all the parts in tune with each other the gear shifting will be much smoother.
I don't know if you have had it happen yet but short shifting and lower engine rpm may induce
a false neutral. So as stated above keep the revs above 4000 when shifting.
 

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Just watched a new BMW RR get it's first service.

400 miles with oil and filter change. They need BMW software to unlock the rev ceiling which only the dealer has! Not sure how much that cost.
 

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My favorite saying is ride it like you stole it. But do change the oil regularly.
George
 

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After 1000 miles break in is done. These are rev happy engines, go for it. 70 HP doesn't sound like a lot by today's standards, but at wide open throttle above 7000rpm it feels pretty good.
 

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Break in is for the rider on a new to them bike......the engine and bike doesn't need a break in period. Ride it like you normally would, do an early oil change if it makes you feel better. How many of you break in a new car?
 

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Just watched a new BMW RR get it's first service.

400 miles with oil and filter change. They need BMW software to unlock the rev ceiling which only the dealer has! Not sure how much that cost.
It costs $3,000,000 and you have to agree to sell you soul to Satan in a blood ritual held in the basement at the secret sacrificial alter ever BMW dealership has. You've never seen it because they have to use a separate special dealer computer to unlock the door. The buyer is also responsible for the rental of the alter and snacks afterwards.:surprise:
 

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Break in is for the rider on a new to them bike......the engine and bike doesn't need a break in period. Ride it like you normally would, do an early oil change if it makes you feel better. How many of you break in a new car?
Wonder how many people buy a new bike and keep it for 5 years and/or 20,000 miles. I'd bet the percentages are in the single digits.

Any modern bike's motor will last for 20K ridden even remotely normal even if you never change the oil.

As far as the person stating the transmission is what is wearing in that might the on shared sumps. But for bike like BMW boxers or Guzzi's, Ural, Harley with a engines separate from the transmission that theory doesn't flesh out.

What happens on a bike with no tach. How is one to know what RPM range you should run in.

Again it all bullocks. Ride it how you normally would, don't beat on it too terribly hard for the 1st few miles and as BB suggest change the oil early if that make you feel better.
 

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So I bought a new japanese truck a year or so ago and I was told there was no real break in period, the tolerances are much tighter now and there is no real worry about bedding in the cylinders...It will just loosen up on its own but if it makes you feel better just keep the tach north of 4k rpms for a 1000 miles or so regardless of speed
 

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My 2017 Tacoma's 1st oil change was at 10,000 miles or 12 months whatever came 1st. Oil change intervals after that are every 10K. July 7th I'll have had it 2 years and just turned over 9,600 miles and it'll get it 2nd oil change n a couple weeks.
 

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New bike break in. Followed manual up to 7000 rpms to 1000 miles. After 1000 miles (after reading resources to hit red line for break in), I stayed in 3rd to get to 8500 rps for about a 45 second length of time a couple times. Seems like a struggle on the engine. My question is...is it ok to crank up the rpms in lower gears to finish the break in? Did I do damage? No way I can hit even 7000 RPMs in 6th gear. Too fast. Thanks!

Did you do the 5000 RPM to 1000 KM break in first
?
 

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To the OP- I sense a misunderstanding here. I don't read Suzuki's recommendations to mean that you have to rev your new bike to redline in order to "complete" a break-in procedure. They are simply giving their permission to rev to redline after observing the lower limit for a short period when new. There is certainly no need to rev an engine to redline to unlock any benefit.

Whether or not there is a benefit to the recommended break-in period, it is a sound idea from the manufacturer's point if view. They have to warrant a new machine and it certainly increases their odds of success if you take it easy. You've gotten good advice here regarding keeping it in a happy place. DD
 

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Regarding the transmission break-in, I do think there's something to that. Having torn down a lot of Japanese bikes for warranty issues and regular repair, I'd have to say there's nothing harder on a bike transmission than missed shifts. The temptation to pull up again and cram it into gear is hard to resist. A new transmission can be a little stiff, and easy for a new rider to miss a shift, especially under hard acceleration. Keeping the max revs down has the potential to protect it. There's not a lot of room in there for error, and a little chip off a tooth edge gets through there pretty quickly. Add to that the high revs of the missed shift, it's not good.

My '17 650 was a little stiff when it was new, but shifting smoothed out after a hundred miles or so. It's really a great shifting transmission in my opinion. DD
 

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Run it through some heat cycles to get things settled down into position and keep the oil clean, you will be good to go.
 

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My gearbox shifted the smoothest of any bike I have driven when I pulled out of the dealer parking lot. For break in I just ran it up and down the gears at night through residential streets in Toronto. Pretty sure I coulda just ridden it anyway I wanted. I have a gut feeling these DLs are very happy mechanically.
 
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