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Hi everyone,

I picked up my 2018 DL1000 yesterday from the dealership. Rode 360km the yesterday. Did a lot of the break in then. Decided to change the oil today and run the engine a bit harder. Used the Suzuki 10W-40 and a new Suzuki filter.

Everything looked great. Filled right to the full line.

Rode it for about 10 min and stopped at a gas station to make sure everything was still looking good and I noticed quite a bit of rattle/knocking noise at idle. Pulling the clutch in made it mostly go away with just a very little bit of rattle. I rode to a local dealership and they agreed that it was abnormally loud but told me to go back 3 hour drive to where I originally bought it to get it serviced.... :serious:

Seems like it's the crappy clutch basket that they put on these bikes - after a brief Google search. Any advice on what to do?

Thanks!
 

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Sounds like "idle hammer", not the clutch basket. … They all do it … some more or a lot more than others. I guess you did not hear it with the original oil but only after the first oil change. Read up on it here and see if its that or not. Mine is not so bad and mostly disappears when pulling in the clutch. I think Realshelby has a fix for it, if it nerves you too much.
 

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End float in the crank. There's a small side force on the crank as the pistons go up and down and depending on that can move the crank side to side.

And yes, 'depending on' is very vague. Not wanting to get kicked for starting an oil thread but thicker oils tend to reduce this.

Clutch rattle tends to turn up much later, 20,000k's or so.
 

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Funny how some clutch noise from a Suzuki freaks people out, but noise from a Ducati is OK.

Mine was pretty noisy from early on as well. I bought my bike in winter and brought it home 4 hours in my truck, so there's no going back. (no dealer up here either) I think it's the rotational mass of the clutch parts combined with the twin cylinder pulses at low RPM and sloppy tolerances. I see 3 options:

Replace the clutch parts with closer fitting improved parts to make it go away

Tighten clutch cable and/or pushrod to remove free play, and/or bump up idle speed to minimize it

Not worry about it and just ride​
 

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I wonder what is so special about the oil that Suzuki uses at the factory that prevents the idle hammer. Seems like it always shows up immediately after the first oil change.
 

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I would NOT remove all the clutch free-play. This will cause excessive clutch wear. Free play is required and there is a proper range. realshelby is the go to guy for both clutch rattle/chudder or idle hammer.

This is an area where Suzuki should hang their engineering head in shame. As far as "do not worry about it", this statement has some merit.

My 2007 vee had both clutch chudder and idle hammer. Both on the mild side compared to some DL1000s I have heard. Mine happily motored on past 100,000 miles with both issues. I learned to ride around the clutch chudder zone and ignored the idle hammer. The very fact that these conditions existed pissed me off.

Then I bought a 2013 Super Tenere (for a change only, I still like the stroms). Well Yamaha engineers must have cheated on the same test Suzuki did and mine had a very similar clutch issue. Pissed off again. But, in 2014, Yamaha listened to their customers and redesigned the clutch system. Most everybody I know yanked there old clutches out of the Tenere (making ash trays out of them) and installed the redesigned clutch assembly.
 

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Idle hammer, and mine seemed to start after the first oil change. there's all kinds of theories on that, i personally just think it starts around 5-600 miles. It doesnt seem to bother me anymore, unless im in a cranky mood in hot weather and traffic, then it seems to ramp up.
 

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https://youtu.be/VWLwUQQsrJI

Here is the video of it. What do you think... Clutch or idle hammer?

Thanks corndog, I'll reach out to him.
What a sweet sounding motor and it sounds exactly like mine. And Yes, mine manifested its rattle immediately after the first oil change. The rattle comes and goes depending on engine temperature or carburation. I have long gotten over it and accept it as a part of the character of the motorcycle. Folks have spent good money getting rid of it and I suppose if it was bugging them that much then fair play. It is not the first bike I have heard a primary drive rattle on and they are usually twins with an uneven firing sequence. My X-Adv motor is just as loud at times and it is a twin with a 270 crank.

As was said above I suggest also to forget it and ride. :wink2:
 

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Had the same issue...Idle Hammer for sure.

Went to the dealer and Suzuki sent them a notice on that. Stating that's due to the engine configuration, and will not harm the engine what so ever. Just went to the dealer so that they can register it in the system.

Found out that using other brand or oil. Motul 5100 in my case. Make it less noisy and the clutching ( was about to think I was due for a clutch after only 6000 miles) seems better than with the Suzuki oil.
 

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That is Idle Hammer.

For reasons no one has yet figured out it starts immediately after the first oil change.

Will never hurt anything.

Clutch basket issues on these typically don't come around until you approach 20,000 miles. Some less, some more, some way more.
 
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EVERY motorcycle I have ever owned has done this. I wouldn't sweat it.

I have been under the impression that the V-Stroms are stone reliable. Is the clutch basket thing like the "rectifier" some bikes (maybe only 650s) had trouble with in the past that needed to be changed and once it was the problem went away? By this I mean will all bikes have this issue and is it a defect or a part that has simply worn out?

NC
 

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All years DL and SV 1000 have clutch basket design issues. The later models are tighter from the factory and take longer to show symptoms. That also means these come on slower and that means the owners tend to not realize how much difference there is!

This is NOT like a rectifier or stator problem that leaves you stranded!

Not really a reliability issue at all. Meaning it will NOT leave you stranded. What it does is add a lot of unwelcome noises and worst of all some significant vibrations that are bad enough that you tend to learn to ride around the problem. Like always keeping the bike above 4000 rpm. There is a permanent fix for the design problems. See my signature below!
 
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I read in a setup sheet a few years ago that DL1000s' come with straight 30 wt. mineral oil from the factory.
I'd give it a try before I took anything appart.

Jim
 

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I read in a setup sheet a few years ago that DL1000s' come with straight 30 wt. mineral oil from the factory.
I'd give it a try before I took anything appart.

Jim
My understanding is that there is no special "break in oil", matter of fact Ducati's come from the factory with full synthetic Shell SynPower oil. I think it's the luck of the draw, as my 05 1000 had the hammer but my 06 didn't.
 

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I would NOT remove all the clutch free-play. This will cause excessive clutch wear. Free play is required and there is a proper range. realshelby is the go to guy for both clutch rattle/chudder or idle hammer.
Horsefeathers! Just removing the free play is not going to wear the clutch at all. (unless you go nuts and crank on it to the point that you're nearly disengaging) It just takes the slack out of the cable and your lever won't rattle on bumpy roads so much. The clutch will probably wear LESS if anything because it's actually disengaged while sitting at a light.
 

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Horsefeathers! Just removing the free play is not going to wear the clutch at all. (unless you go nuts and crank on it to the point that you're nearly disengaging) It just takes the slack out of the cable and your lever won't rattle on bumpy roads so much. The clutch will probably wear LESS if anything because it's actually disengaged while sitting at a light.
Why you ask:confused:? Well I assume "Horsefeathers" means you were politely asking why anyway....:wink2:

Because the clutch pressure plate has a bearing that should not be in contact with the push rod unless you are disengaging the clutch. The pressure plate is always spinning, the push rod is not. When the bike is in gear and rolling, or in neutral with the clutch engaged, the free play is the distance between the push rod end and the bearing.

This is why the clutch adjustment is important. You remove all free play, then back off the adjuster a small amount to set a minimum free play. Minimal play is OK but no play is not. As the clutch disks wear the free-play goes away and on a cable style clutch it must be adjusted periodically.

The best way to understand this is to pull up a micro-fiche from a DL650 clutch. At the pressure plate end of the push rod you will see a bearing. In a manual car tranny, this would be called a throw out bearing. Nice thing about a hydraulic clutch is free play is self adjusting.

P.S. - to me a disengaged clutch is when you have the lever pulled to the bar and the bike will not move while in gear.
 

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Horsefeathers! Just removing the free play is not going to wear the clutch at all. (unless you go nuts and crank on it to the point that you're nearly disengaging) It just takes the slack out of the cable and your lever won't rattle on bumpy roads so much. The clutch will probably wear LESS if anything because it's actually disengaged while sitting at a light.
Why you ask<img src="http://www.stromtrooper.com/images/moresmilies/new_confused2.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Confused" class="inlineimg" />? Well I assume "Horsefeathers" means you were politely asking why anyway....<img src="http://www.stromtrooper.com/images/StromTrooper_2015/smilies/tango_face_wink.png" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" class="inlineimg" />

Because the clutch pressure plate has a bearing that should not be in contact with the push rod unless you are disengaging the clutch. The pressure plate is always spinning, the push rod is not. When the bike is in gear and rolling, or in neutral with the clutch engaged, the free play is the distance between the push rod end and the bearing.

This is why the clutch adjustment is important. You remove all free play, then back off the adjuster a small amount to set a minimum free play. Minimal play is OK but no play is not. As the clutch disks wear the free-play goes away and on a cable style clutch it must be adjusted periodically.

The best way to understand this is to pull up a micro-fiche from a DL650 clutch. At the pressure plate end of the push rod you will see a bearing. In a manual car tranny, this would be called a throw out bearing. Nice thing about a hydraulic clutch is free play is self adjusting.

P.S. - to me a disengaged clutch is when you have the lever pulled to the bar and the bike will not move while in gear.
Good with a clutch with a cable...but the 1000 has an hydraulic clutch.
 
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